Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
China Businesses Patents United States

Trade War Or Not, China is Closing the Gap on US in Technology IP Race (reuters.com) 149

China's rising investment in research and expansion of its higher education system mean that it is fast closing the gap with the United States in intellectual property and the struggle to be the No.1 global technology power, according to patent experts. From a report: While U.S. President Donald Trump's threat of punitive tariffs on high-tech U.S. exports could slow Beijing's momentum, it won't turn back the tide, they say. Washington's allegation that the Chinese have engaged in intellectual property theft over many years -- which is denied by Beijing -- is a central reason for the worsening trade conflict between the U.S. and China. Forecasts for how long it will take for Beijing to close the technological gap vary -- though several patent specialists say it could happen in the next decade.

And China is already leapfrogging ahead in a couple of areas. "With the number of scientists China is training every year it will eventually catch up, regardless of what the U.S. does," said David Shen, head of IP for China at global law firm Allen & Overy. Indeed, IP lawyers now see President Xi Jinping's pledge earlier this week to protect foreign IP rights as projecting confidence in China's position as a leading innovator in sectors such as telecommunications and online payments, as well as its ability to catch up in other areas.

Trade War Or Not, China is Closing the Gap on US in Technology IP Race

Comments Filter:
  • by TimMD909 ( 260285 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @02:57PM (#56433045) Homepage
    Does this mean all the other countries of the world can start stealing their intellectual property soon? It's been a bit one sided so far...
    • by DNS-and-BIND ( 461968 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @03:07PM (#56433119) Homepage
      U kidding? They're going to protect their computer systems, unlike America who left critical systems that should have been air-gapped on the public internet. A little-known fact is that the Great Firewall isn't just for keeping Chinese from accessing foreign sites, it also does a great job of keeping snooping foreigners out of Chinese sites. China has a mostly safe, secure playground for its own people. Don't be absurd, they won't fall for the same mistakes their opponent stupidly committed.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by ctilsie242 ( 4841247 )

        Not just China, other countries either have Great Firewalls in place, or will. The Aussies have one, Iran does, and I'm sure there are many others. By keeping the attackers limited to what is physically in the country, this cuts down greatly on what attacks can be done, and what succeed.

        The US's worst problem is that C-levels of corporations can greatly profit when their companies are hacked. This will ensure that breaches, and egregious ones, will continue for a long time to come. The top company brass

        • The US's worst problem is that C-levels of corporations can greatly profit when their companies are hacked. This will ensure that breaches, and egregious ones, will continue for a long time to come. The top company brass finds about the hack, short their stock, makes an announcement that their customers are hosed, and laugh all the way to the bank.

          The companies with enough technology to even matter for that purpose are watched like a hawk by institutional investors. You're a total moron if you think both them, and financial institutions that are inevitably part of the shorting process, would allow that to happen, ESPECIALLY when they're the ones who were conned.

    • by sinij ( 911942 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @03:13PM (#56433167)

      Does this mean all the other countries of the world can start stealing their intellectual property soon? It's been a bit one sided so far...

      What do you mean start? I have been pirating Maoist porn at least since cultural revolution.

    • by klingens ( 147173 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @03:13PM (#56433171)

      It's not been one sided. The young US did exactly the same to the technologically most advanced nation of the 18th/19th century, the UK:
      E.g. https://www.pri.org/stories/20... [pri.org]

      A developing nation will always "steal" the knowledge about technology and manufacturing from other, more advanced, nations. This is the normal course of history, it has happened many times before and will happen in the future. Not only the US did it back then, but also Germany stole from the UK for example. In more recent times, Japan did it as well.
      Just like you can't protect the latest blockbuster from getting torrented, you cannot keep tech to yourself, same unsolvable problem.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        The Chinese are stealing the right stuff - like solar and other green tech.

        And in the meantime, our policies are to go back to the 19th century and use coal.

        When we lose our energy independence to China will be some tough soul searching.

  • Not. There aren't even any tariffs except on steel and aluminum, and those don’t apply to some of the biggest US trading partners. Talk is not a tariff. A tariff is not a "trade war".

    News media should report the news when it happens, not before it happens — as they imagine it might someday happen.

    • Your should read the news then. The reported news isn't that there is a trade war. It's that there is fear and talk of trade war. You need to ignore this nuance to make the point you wish you could make.

      • You have a better understanding than most not familiar with the topic. The way it is reported, most people think that tariffs are part of trade wars and that Trump has already started the trade war by himself.

        And it's reported that way on purpose - to scare people.

      • by Kohath ( 38547 )

        Your should read the news then. The reported news isn't that there is a trade war. It's that there is fear and talk of trade war. You need to ignore this nuance to make the point you wish you could make.

        The nuance is opposite the facts.

  • Well, yeah (Score:3, Insightful)

    by cascadingstylesheet ( 140919 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @03:02PM (#56433087)
    Well, yeah. When you can steal until you don't need to anymore, I guess that is kind of convenient ...
  • Wrong metric (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DNS-and-BIND ( 461968 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @03:04PM (#56433103) Homepage
    This is being measured entirely by patents. This is the wrong metric to use, although I'm sure the usual suspects are creaming in their pants to see another "America is going to get it" article. They hate our guts and dream of the day we'll be humiliated. What can I say, we deserve it, we're horrible people. Patents in the USA, particularly regarding software, are total bullshit. They shouldn't even be granted, and when they are, they're either for totally obscure ideas or for ideas obvious to anyone in the art. Patents in China are bullshit too, they don't have anything to do with actual progress. Hey, who cares though, journalists aren't experts and they love to distill complex topics down to a single number that they mistakenly regard like a sports score.
    • by hAckz0r ( 989977 )

      This is being measured entirely by patents.

      Yes, you know China is no longer a backwards country anymore when you can measure them in the "total patent lawyers" metric. China, welcome to the 21st Century!

    • by k6mfw ( 1182893 )

      This is being measured entirely by patents. This is the wrong metric to use,

      Reminds me about 25 years ago at a presentation I heard most patents are never used, the ones that are very small percentage of those make any money. Presenter also said "Patents don't prevent others using your idea, it only gives you the right to litigate."

  • by Anonymous Coward

    How many scientists and engineers do you know who are unemployed, struggling to make a decent living, or doing something unrelated to their academic training? How many more do you know who are languishing at jobs they hate and that underutilize their talent? How many do you know who are wasting their time and talent writing cell phone apps or something equally menial?

    The U.S. technology sector is trading innovation for short term profits and temporary capital gains. Silicon Valley is more about venture capi

    • by Anonymous Coward

      It has certainly been my impression that there are far more people trained up and wanting to do a career in science than available jobs. But unless/until the coal miners of Pennsylvania are willing to vote in politicians who will tax away the money that rich people are spending on luxury watches and designer handbags and use that money to fund things like cancer research, I don't see much of a solution.

    • Most people are in a job that under-utilizes their talent. Institutions are not very good at, or designed, to maximize individual contribution.

  • Oh, wait, no, I know exactly where they got it from.

  • They've been spending on STEM while we've been cutting back in favor of tax cuts (83% for the top 1%, but I guess the 99% got 17% of them).
  • by hey! ( 33014 ) on Friday April 13, 2018 @04:12PM (#56433457) Homepage Journal

    The US represents about 4% of the global population. China is 19%. If China ever got its political head out of the wrong end of its anatomy it would crush us. Even if they only manage not to be stubbornly stupid they'll be tough to keep up with in the 21st Century.

    So how can the US maintain it's scientific and technological preeminence? The same way it got it in the first place: immigration. US 20th century STEM preeminence is built mostly by people who came here looking for religious and political toleration, especially around WW2.

    No immigrants means no Manhattan Project or US space program. No Admiral Hyman Rickover, so no US nuclear navy. No Sikorsky helicopters. No US Steel, Bell Telephone, or Westinghouse Electric. Just excluding John von Neumann alone would leave a huge hole in US scientific prestige. And today, if you waved a magic wand and eliminated all immigrants in the US, more than half of the scientists and engineers working in the US would disappear.

    Immigration doesn't bring the worst people here, it brings the best, or at least the most enterprising. Nearly half of US fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or children of immigrants.

    • by Anonymous Coward
      How many people live in Islamic nations? A lot. Yet ZERO contribution to technological progress since Islam took over.

      Population does not translate to ability to innovate. Culture plays much bigger role.
    • That STEM dominance was built by already-educated people fleeing Europe to a similar culture with which they shared many values. Adding millions of low intelligence third-world peasants who are illiterate in their own native languages, much less English, is not a secret to success for any nation. Other countries wonder aloud what we think we're going to accomplish by it.

      Because immigration was good in the past does not mean it's good in the present, or the future. That's a logical fallacy, I forget whi

    • "or children of immigrants."

      So...not immigrants.

  • we're bringing coal back! #MAGA!

  • developing 'new' IP based on others old IP is easy
    coming up with fresh new ideas is hard

  • Edge: A Conversation With Kai-Fu Lee [3.26.18] [edge.org]

    After the boring stuff (a who's-who of artificial intelligence research, including one Bob Mercer) and the "~ ~ ~ ~" article divider, this one-way-mirror interview is all about the technological VC ambitions arising in China now.

Heuristics are bug ridden by definition. If they didn't have bugs, then they'd be algorithms.

Working...