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Crime United States Games

Kansas 'Swat' Perpetrator Is Now Also Wanted in Florida (kansas.com) 87

An anonymous reader writes: Florida police recount how close they were to aresting 25-year-old Tyler Barriss before his fake call to Kansas police led to a fatal shooting. "Panama City Beach police Lt. J.R. Talamantez told the Panama City News Herald that police had tied Barriss to about 30 other bomb threats," reports the Wichita Eagle -- a full month before another call led to the fatal shooting of a father of two in Kansas. But attempts to secure an arrest warrant may have been slowed by the lack of an address, since apparently Barriss "lived in a shelter in South Los Angeles. Police there found him in a local library."

A Florida newspaper reports that their local police department is now doing what they can to right the situation. "Lt. J.R. Talamantez, cyber crimes investigator with the Panama City Beach police, said the department currently has two felony warrants issued for Barris' arrest and is providing the U.S. Attorney's Office with information... Talamantez said the end goal is to identify all victims of Barriss' calls and bring him to justice on all those incidents... "We just want to send a message that this isn't going to end with a slap on the wrist. The victims will see an appropriate punishment."

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Kansas 'Swat' Perpetrator Is Now Also Wanted in Florida

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  • Another day (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 10, 2018 @06:39PM (#56240405)

    Another Known Wolf.

    • At least they had the excuse of the guy not having a known address, let alone having been called to the address in question 39 times.

  • Maybe you could have phrased that better, chief.

  • by DCFusor ( 1763438 ) on Saturday March 10, 2018 @06:48PM (#56240437) Homepage
    The caller, the shooter of an innocent person? It needn't be an either/or issue. I say, both!
    • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

      by LWATCDR ( 28044 )

      They both have. The officer that made an error in a tense situation has lost his job. The swatter is I hope going to jail for a very long time.
      What I can not understand is how so many people are so anti-police. The officer was told that this was a hostage situation and that the caller had already killed his father. They where also told that hostages where all female. A guy walks out and then reaches for the waistband of his pants. The officer thought he was going for a gun and shot. Everyone seems to want a

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        'Anti-police' and 'police should do better' are not the same thing. Quit conflating them.

        We really need to get rid of the whole 'reaching for their waistband' as an automatic excuse for the police to open fire. Too many actions can be interpreted / distorted as reaching for a waistband. Firing at the first motion seems to be based on the assumption that the person doing the reaching is some sort of movie-level quick draw artist - able to pull a gun out of their pants, aim and fire so fast that a police offi

      • by Maritz ( 1829006 )

        Employ better police. Train them better. Have police who are not snivelling, jumpy cowards. Try that. See how you get on.

    • by Maritz ( 1829006 )

      This happened in the US. Police there get to shoot whoever they like, more or less. Most of the time they don't even stop being cops.

      I agree the cop should be prosecuted, but it's not really a part of the world where that kind of thing happens.

  • by DontBeAMoran ( 4843879 ) on Saturday March 10, 2018 @07:22PM (#56240537)

    The victims will see an appropriate punishment.

    So he's going to be locked in a cell and SWAT teams will randomly terrorize him for years, day and night, without warning, at random hours?

    • The victims will see an appropriate punishment.

      So he's going to be locked in a cell and SWAT teams will randomly terrorize him for years, day and night, without warning, at random hours?

      No, he's going to walk.

      He's not capable of understanding that he has done anything wrong. Any good lawyer will play that like a fiddle. He's a narcissistic psychopath or some other melange of serious mental disorders. No judge or jury will be able to hold him legally accountable for his actions.

      He'll maybe get a stay in a psych ward somewhere, and then be freed when the psychiatrists get bored with him.

      • by geoskd ( 321194 ) on Saturday March 10, 2018 @09:03PM (#56240879)

        He'll maybe get a stay in a psych ward somewhere, and then be freed when the psychiatrists get bored with him.

        That's not the way that process works.

        The way it actually works, is the judge finds that a defendant is incapable of understanding the consequences of their actions, and orders that the defendant be held in an institution for such people (This is a process known as being involuntarily committed, and can be undertaken by a judge or a family member). If at such a time in the future, the person in question is planned for release from the facility in question, they are remanded back to the custody of the court, and the original proceedings are continued. This is not a get out of jail free card, unless you mistakenly think that involuntary commitment is anything other than a prison.

        Once a person has been committed, even the entity that committed them cannot get them released without the facilities consent or a court order to that effect.

      • You do realize that being committed for being insane usually leads to a longer stay than if you'd actually been convicted of the crime, right?

      • by Kjella ( 173770 )

        He's not capable of understanding that he has done anything wrong. Any good lawyer will play that like a fiddle. He's a narcissistic psychopath or some other melange of serious mental disorders. No judge or jury will be able to hold him legally accountable for his actions. He'll maybe get a stay in a psych ward somewhere, and then be freed when the psychiatrists get bored with him.

        Not very likely. The insanity defense is used for people with delusions, hallucinations, compulsions, psychotic episodes and such, that is to say people who lack the capacity to understand and/or control their actions. Not feeling bad about your crimes, poor impulse control or stalking/obsessive behavior is generally not enough for an insanity defense in the US, at least not after the 1984 Insanity Defense Reform Act. Besides it's more like a life sentence [nytimes.com], the whole system is rigged against ever getting ou

    • by rsilvergun ( 571051 ) on Saturday March 10, 2018 @09:38PM (#56240949)
      and personally I think it's a little screwed up that we use the prisoners themselves to inflict the cruel and unusual punishment that we don't have the stomach to do ourselves. Then again I'm not in favor of punishment based prison. Either rehabilitate him or keep him locked up for life if we think he'll be a danger to the community. But I'd like us to be good enough people that we don't have to resort to round about torture.

      Either that or go all in and use pain ray [google.com] on them 24/7 until their heart fails. At least then we'd be admitting we want to cause pain and suffering.
  • A police cyber crimes investigator is also the one doing the sentencing: "this isn't going to end with a slap on the wrist. The victims will see an appropriate punishment."?
  • And this needs to be done nationwide. Unlike a lot of theoretical vulnerabilities demonstrated at the conferences, this is literally a matter of life and death. This kid isn't the only one out there pulling this kind of shit.

    And they need to train 911 operators to spot and react properly to out-of-state calls.

    • Well you can't have 911 operators refuse to respond to a call because it originates out of state. For every one of these terrible pranks, there's people who call in because of legitimate emergencies with loved ones in other states.
      Caller ID, it's quite the redesign. There's too many legit uses to not allow spoofing at all; you'd have to somehow have every 911 center hooked into every phone company system to view the real origin, as well as into every VoIP provider (and with that, you'll only have IP and bi
      • Well you can't have 911 operators refuse to respond to a call because it originates out of state.

        I'm curious: do they decide if the call is local because of the area code or because of some telemetry location data, like a cell tower's location? If it's area code, then that's just stupid. I've moved from one coast to the other in the past 3 years and I still have an area code from the midwest.

        If they use actual location data, then that's a little more reasonable, but I can still imagine a scenario where

  • by Anonymous Coward

    They seem to be showing a pattern of ignoring clear warning signs.
    They failed to take action prior to the recent school shooting and now we find out that they let 30 bomb threats go.
    I'm starting to think the whole big brother thing is just a scare tactic to reduce crime without doing anything except over-exaggerating their capabilities.
    How many other red-flags are they ignoring?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Glad, they're taking care of the idiot "just for lulz" guy. Hope they're going to charge the SWAT cop if they haven't already, too.

  • by kilodelta ( 843627 ) on Sunday March 11, 2018 @03:34PM (#56243625) Homepage
    The people doing the swatting are idiots. If you're gonna misuse an instrument of state use it to creative purpose. For example you could swat the more idiotic politicians in the region. That would be great fun too especially if someone could tap their in-house camera systems.

    Maybe then we'd get them to pass legislation ending the trusted CLID business.

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