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Businesses Movies Piracy Television Entertainment

Despite Netflix and Amazon Prime, Most of the World Watches Pirated Content (techinasia.com) 244

An anonymous reader shares a TechInAsia report: More than half of the people surveyed across the world still watch pirated movies and TV shows, a new survey shows. The study, conducted by digital security firm Irdeto, asked more than 25,000 adults across 30 countries about video watching trends. Here's what it found: 52 percent of those surveyed said they watch pirated videos. 48 said they would stop, or watch less illegal content after they were told about the damaging effects of piracy on the media industry. While many recognize that producing or sharing pirated video is illegal (70 percent), far fewer people are aware that streaming or downloading is also against the law (59 percent).
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Despite Netflix and Amazon Prime, Most of the World Watches Pirated Content

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  • lol amazon prime (Score:5, Informative)

    by whoozwah ( 4223029 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:44PM (#54008099)
    Dude. Amazon prime's streaming is garbage. It's all bait n switch. You're paying 100 bucks a year and you only get a handful of episodes per show/season. After that they expect you to pay per episode. No thanks.
    • by hawguy ( 1600213 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:54PM (#54008163)

      Dude. Amazon prime's streaming is garbage. It's all bait n switch. You're paying 100 bucks a year and you only get a handful of episodes per show/season. After that they expect you to pay per episode. No thanks.

      Well, you're not paying $100/year for prime streaming. At least few people are.

      I'm paying $100/year for the shipping benefits (I make it all back during Christmastime when I send gifts to my extended family), the prime streaming is just a perk... and sometimes useful since there are some shows that Prime has that Netflix doesn't. So prime streaming is worth something to be, but not $100/year. Maybe $10/year. Though if I didn't have Netflix, Prime Video would be much more valuable to me.

      • Re:lol amazon prime (Score:5, Informative)

        by dmomo ( 256005 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:24PM (#54008435)

        I found that often, even though we are paying Prime fees for free shipping, the shipping fees are still often reflected in the cost of the item. I don't know why I keep Prime. They seem to be double dipping at times. When you search for the same item and find it for a lower price, it's likely a non-prime item, and often the price difference is pretty much in the ball park of the 2-day shipping cost.

        • This. Amazon is convenient, but their prices have bloated since prime such that most of the time it is worth my while to find a promotion elsewhere and get free shipping. Prime basically keeps me from becoming irate at Xmas time when my wife would otherwise just be ordering stuff without heeding how much shipping is going to be at the last minute for the cheap garbage her relatives want for Xmas. Between Prime BS and their search algorithm that mostly ignores my search terms I am really close to being do

        • there is a checkbox on the left nav for "Prime". Check it and you will only see prime shipping eligible products. Very helpful you exactly your situation.....
          • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 09, 2017 @03:21PM (#54008841)

            So if the problem is that prime-eligible items have their prices jacked up by the cost of shipping, thus negating the value of the service, the solution is to ignore the problem? Do you work for Amazon?

            • I haven't found that to be the case and no, I don't work for Amazon. But I do buy a lot of stuff from them. Prime, for the shipping alone, is worth it to me.
              • It's definitely the case for small items. I've been using Prime for 10-12 years and the prices for items have slowly crept up. I can frequently find a third party sell that isn't doing prime that has an item that is +Shipping that rivals the prime price. But it's much harder to compare the third party seller because sometimes I get the item in 2 days and other times it's more like 10 days. Where as prime shipping has been more consistent, probably because it all comes from the same set of warehouses.

                Really

            • So if the problem is that prime-eligible items have their prices jacked up by the cost of shipping, thus negating the value of the service, the solution is to ignore the problem? Do you work for Amazon?

              (Not the original poster, but...) I don't think that Prime eligibility, even when the item costs the same as a non-Prime item plus shipping (usually a fixed amount per category, not per item), is necessarily "negating the value of the service." Unlike a random shipping method a third party might choose, Prime shipping is usually two days and gives you the option to upgrade to next-day for a per-item fee. If you don't care how fast it ships, Amazon has also been doing a promotion lately where they let you ch

          • Plus Amazon helpfully states when the product is available cheaper elsewhere in a non-Prime listing - and tells you the price.
        • You're paying for fast shipping with Prime, basic shipping is definitely pre-loaded into the Free Shipping items cost.

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          It's a scam. Once you have it you feel like you should be your money's worth. You buy more from Amazon, and they use it to drive you to the things they want you to buy. Unless you buy a lot of stuff and can't be bothered to wait a few more days for the free shipping you don't even save any money.

          I just use the free trials they offer every few months, but never pay for it.

      • Its a total scam dude, that is why Amazon is being sued over Prime [dailymail.co.uk]. Log out and then look at the prices of several items, note them then log back in and see what the prices are. You'll find your Amazon Prime membership will often raise the prices on items so you aren't saving shit, its just a shell game and all you are really getting for the $100 a year is the streaming service.

        Personally I don't think their content is worth anywhere near a c-note a year so I passed on it but YMMV.

        • by hawguy ( 1600213 )

          Its a total scam dude, that is why Amazon is being sued over Prime [dailymail.co.uk]. Log out and then look at the prices of several items, note them then log back in and see what the prices are. You'll find your Amazon Prime membership will often raise the prices on items so you aren't saving shit, its just a shell game and all you are really getting for the $100 a year is the streaming service.

          Personally I don't think their content is worth anywhere near a c-note a year so I passed on it but YMMV.

          The article you linked to doesn't match what you are saying.

          The lawsuit claims:

          Instead, the suits accuse Amazon of offering free shipping on items whose prices had been inflated to incorporate the cost of the shipping.

          Well duh, Amazon doesn't try to hide that, items with "free" prime shipping often cost more than items without free shipping, or with paid shipping.

          This is especially true with low-cost items. For example: Sharpie Permanent Markers, Ultra Fine Point, Black, 5 Count [amazon.com]

          Here's the pricing Amazon advertises:

          Price: $5.79 FREE Shipping (3 days) for Prime members Details

          Note: Available at a lower price from other sellers, potentially without free Prime shipping.

          New (61) from $4.99 & FREE shipping.

          I've tried the "Clear your cookies and check pricing" trick after other people have said that Amazon inflates prime prices, and ha

        • Whenever I search Amazon, I do it to find the item, then log on to purchase it. I've never seen the prices jump.

    • by gnick ( 1211984 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:55PM (#54008169) Homepage

      This goes hand-in-hand with TFA's conclusion. Start watching a series on Prime, continue watching it pirated. Then, next time, eliminate Prime from the loop since it added so little. Amazon Prime and Netflix will never have as wide a catalog as TPB.

      • by serviscope_minor ( 664417 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @03:46PM (#54008949) Journal

        Then, next time, eliminate Prime from the loop since it added so little.

        It actually subtracts a bit, rather than adds anything. Thing is, go to TPB, type in the name, get a super fast download (choose the quality), and watch it on any device, with your own media player, in any way you want with precisely ZERO hassles from DRM.

        That's the problem with pirated stuff: it's not just that's free, it's also better.

        Contrast that with music. If I get it from amazon, after paying, I get a zip file with nicely categorized, DRM free, play anywhere anyhow files in it. That is an excellent product.

        • Nailed it. (Score:2, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward

          The movie industry leaders made a collective decision to retain control over the distribution of their digital products. They saw what happened to the music industry as a loss of control. Your "excellent product" is precisely what they despise.

          In the short term, there is absolutely no plan in place to rectify this. No video-content producer wants to be beholden to free-market impacts on price. They absolutely don't want to accept the terms of someone else's video streaming service. They abhor the thoug

      • Make your own streaming service for free.

      • I had subscribed to Netflix, then canceled my subscription because most stuff that I wanted to watch (e.g. my favorite movies) weren't available in my country. Lack of localized subtitles was a major no-no for my wife. Incomplete cartoon series was a let-down for my kids.

        Pirated movies are of excellent quality, have localized subtitles, some are dubbed in my language (important for cartoons). Shortly put, better service.
        I couldn't care less about "exclusive contracts" preventing me from enjoying content leg

        • I had subscribed to Netflix, then canceled my subscription because most stuff that I wanted to watch (e.g. my favorite movies) weren't available in my country.

          This, emphatically. I had it for three days, then canceled it when I realised how fragmented and... relentlessly Pink their selection was. The Subgenius needs SLACK, not ... digital MUSH.

    • Work the system... (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Get the Amazon cash rewards Visa. Use it for everything but pay off the balance monthly to avoid fees. That 1% to 3% cash back more than pays off the $100 prime membership. All in all I get about $600 per year using cash back cards and no service fees.
    • What people do, vs what people say they do, vs what people say that people do are three almost disconnected things.

      Do you break the law? Would you stop if X? How many paying customers do you have?

      All of these are extremely loaded questions, without some form of independent validation of the results - voluntary answers are highly unreliable.

  • by Baron_Yam ( 643147 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:45PM (#54008105)

    It used to be that art was more or less done because either the artist was driven or a patron was willing to fund it.

    Right now, art in various forms draws a lot of money... but it isn't piracy that will kill Hollywood, it's machinima. Once an affordable computer can replicate the real world (plus special effects)realistically, the current system will fail completely.

    Then our problem will be wading through all the polished turds produced by people who only think they're talented while we're trying to find an actual precious stone.

    • by lgw ( 121541 )

      Right now, art in various forms draws a lot of money... but it isn't piracy that will kill Hollywood, it's machinima. Once an affordable computer can replicate the real world (plus special effects)realistically, the current system will fail completely.

      There are low budget efforts from the big studios using this very idea that have been pretty good: Star Wars Clone Wars and Rebels, and the DTV Tinkerbell movies. That level of quality has little "wow" factor, but it doesn't matter if the writing is good. It will soon be to the point that independents can create stuff at that quality level, and make some money.

      But that's a threat to the direct-to-video market. The Marvel movies are also mostly animation, and no independent outfit will be challenging them

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:45PM (#54008109)

    Pirated material can be played with your player of choice, on your device of choice.

    It can be played at 1.5x speed. The audio can be amplified, or filtered, and the channels can be mixed differently.

    The video can be transcoded to meet the needs of a mobile device.

    The content can be consumed off-grid.

    There is just so much convenience when these motherfuckers get out the goddamn way!!!1111

    • by TWX ( 665546 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:07PM (#54008285)

      I think you're drilling-down too far.

      Pirated content is free from restrictions governing its availability. It's availability is not limited to a single television season for a few weeks or months, or for a slate of a hundred films for a few months before being changed-out and no longer being available. The viewer is free to watch any content that they can find any time they want to.

      We have over 2000 movies and TV seasons in our physical media collection spanning five formats. There are no restrictions preventing us from watching whatever we want from this set. If streaming is going to work, this is how it will have to work, like someone's personal movie collection, with everything possible available all of the time, ad infinitum. Forever.

      • by peragrin ( 659227 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:24PM (#54008437)

        It gets better as studios are still restricting content per region and sometimes country. In Europe and USA and Canada you can get commercial for shows that are airing a few miles away but you can't legally watch for another few months per the studios desired schedule.

        I find it funny. You have a hit show world wide. You tell the word when it will air in country a and then get pissed when the world pirates it since it won't be in their country for 6-9 months in the future.

        Piracy is and always will be an economic one if people are pirating your content that means the supply side is not meeting the needs of the demand side in a massive way.

        • by TWX ( 665546 )

          Sometimes I wonder if their staggered-release model is to attempt to span revenue over time. It's generally easier to budget when revenue comes in as a stream rather than in chunks.

          I don't necessarily agree with it mind you, especially when it's been proven that the viewing audience is only willing to wait so long for the next thing that's already out.

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          Disabling common, expected technology is a deal breaker too. For example, if I buy an ebook, it better support text to speech with my choice of high quality speech synthesis engine. I'm not paying 30 bucks for your audiobook version, if you try to force me I'll be paying you nothing at all.

      • by Kjella ( 173770 )

        If streaming is going to work, this is how it will have to work, like someone's personal movie collection, with everything possible available all of the time, ad infinitum. Forever.

        That's what the people on /. said about MP3s too but I'd say Spotify and friends have proven that's not really the problem. The problem is that we want specific content and you'll never be able to say a video is a video in the same way that music streaming services say a song is a song. HBO will want to charge you for Game of Thrones, BBC for Doctor Who, George Lucas for Star Wars, NFL for football, Brazzers for pr0n and so on. And that's okay, but there's no federated access. I'd like to add sources to one

    • I know that's why many people pirate. They will buy the digital title through apple or amazon. Then they will download it from TPB in the format they want for whatever device they have. This is especially true for disney titles and media for children where parents want the movies for not connected hand me down phone or tablets.
    • Well, that might be true, I don't know, I don't pirate, but I suspect a bigger part of it is that it's about actually being able to watch what you want. Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, and the other streaming services rarely actually have the content you're looking for. They're a lightyear away from being the "Watch anything you want, at any time" services they were originally intended to become. Netflix has given up. Prime was probably never meant to be that. Hulu is permanently beleaguered.

      It's a little r

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:46PM (#54008113)
    • by hawguy ( 1600213 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:57PM (#54008195)

      Sure that's funny and all, but how do I find the site for "Impossibly proportioned girls that want to date your testicles!"? I've been searching for that my whole life!

      • by mjwx ( 966435 )

        Sure that's funny and all, but how do I find the site for "Impossibly proportioned girls that want to date your testicles!"? I've been searching for that my whole life!

        This.

        And to add to this that a lot of content that is available on US Netflix is not available outside the US, even on Netflix. So if publishers are going to try to lock down their content, they can expect pirates.

        I believe Gabe Newel, Brad Wardell (Of Stardock) as well as whoever is in charge of CD Projekt Red (GOG) have all said something along the lines of "pirates are just unserved customers".

        In order for me to pay for some shows in the UK I need to wait for them to come out on DVD... that misse

    • by JaredOfEuropa ( 526365 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:15PM (#54008333) Journal
      Pirated content: timely, convenient, a decent choice of formats and compression, unencumbered with DRM for offline watching on any device, a huge selection of both older and new material, easy to find and download. And also cheap, but I put that advantage last for a reason. Remember when we had AllOfMP3? At the time I said it made a great example for a proper legal online music shop. Maybe at some point the movie / TV industry will take note as well, and start offering their content in a more timely and friendly manner.

      In this country, the official position used to be "provide your content in an acceptable manner or we won't prosecute people when they pirate it". They have since changed that policy but I still think it's a decent one. Specifically where it concerns geoblocked content. Not willing to sell here for some arbitrary reason? Then people are free to avail themselves of it as far as I am concerned, and that's precisely what I did for a while with ebooks. I'd try the regular stores, and if I hit a geoblock (which was very often during the early days of ebooks) I'd try a store that accepted PayPal (so I could just enter a bogus US address and bypass the block). But if that failed, TPB usually had what I wanted.

      Copyright was intented to foster the spread of cultural works, and to encourage creators to keep on creating. Giving creators a chance to make some money with their craft is one way to encourage them thusly, but the reward is a means, not an end.
      • by Cigaes ( 714444 )

        Hear, hear!

        I am convinced that most people are inherently honest and would gladly pay for what they watch, if given the chance. And I remember a TED talk by Amanda Palmer [ted.com] saying the same thing.

        But what do they ask us to pay for? Exclusive rights wars, clumsy proprietary players, limited play periods.

        If the studios and distributors had any brains at all, they would acknowledge that limiting the spread of the files is a lost war, they would give easy access to them and a wide variety of payment methods, inclu

    • by Zemran ( 3101 )
      The cartoon shows why people in the US download torrents but outside in the rest of the world where the article was written you do not even have those choices. You have the torrent or nothing. Most people are on much less money than someone in the US so they may know that people in the US think it is wrong to torrent but for someone earning $150 there is no other option. Ending torrents will not save the movie industry, in fact the opposite. Most people cannot afford to buy the movies so stopping copying
  • by GameboyRMH ( 1153867 ) <gameboyrmhNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:48PM (#54008127) Journal

    Prepare to be boarded, lilly-livered DRM-lubbers!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 09, 2017 @01:52PM (#54008155)

    And despite the summary, it isn't necessarily illegal to pirate in certain countries. Heck, the former USTR maintains a special list of countries you should visit [wikipedia.org] if you wanted to do so.

  • we discovered that Netflix offering was a subset of the USA offering in Canada. I actually tried to subscribe to the HBO web service in Canada and discovered that I could not get "Game of Thrones" without paying an extortion fee to Bell Canada who has exclusive rights to distribute HBO content which adds an extra $60/month by forcing people to go cable or satellite services.So..I wait for DVD's from the library.
    • I actually tried to subscribe to the HBO web service in Canada and discovered that I could not get "Game of Thrones" without paying an extortion fee... So..I wait for DVD's from the library.

      Or you could just download it on BitTorrent.

  • All the services like Netflix and Amazon prime have their exclusive content. They are like different channels on cable TV.

    Netflix long ago stopped being a content store and became a content creator.

    it doesn't make any sense to say despite Neflix because Netflix sells their own content, not make others content easily available.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    People wouldn't pirate as much if they weren't getting assraped to watch TV shows, especially when it's something that was broadcast over-the-air in the first place. I'll 'pirate' an episode my DVR somehow missed all I want, and fuck the police, the networks, and all you wankers who whine and cry about it.
  • Netflix might have a lot of content is a few countries, but has little content in most countries. The choice ends up being either not to watch or to pirate. There's no real damage to the industry in such cases.

    • >The choice ends up being either not to watch or to pirate. There's no real damage to the industry in such cases.

      Except of course most people who don't pirate (presumably because they don't know how) will simply settle for what's otherwise available.

      You may not recall the 'good old days' of broadcast television pre-On Demand and pre-VCR... but if one of the handful of channels you could get in your area didn't have what you wanted and you didn't feel like doing something other than sit in front of the tu

      • by Luthair ( 847766 )
        You're describing pre-cable even from the sounds of it, if it wasn't local or nationally syndicated people didn't even know about it since all their information sources were also local and wouldn't have had access either.
  • by transami ( 202700 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:03PM (#54008241) Homepage

    The content companies only have themselves to blame, mostly at least. When there is no way to catch up on missed episodes the only choice is pirated or stop watching altogether. Which would they prefer? Beyond that, cable isn't cheap. We pay $100 a month for something that we used to get for free over the air. And most of the world is dirt poor, so if they can't get content for cheap... I'm not exactly poor but I'd never ordinarily pay $1.99 just to watch one episode of one show.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      We pay $100 a month for something that we used to get for free over the air.

      Bullshit. What you used to get over the air, you can still get over the air, for free.
      You pay $100 a month because you aren't willing to settle just for what comes over the air, or even the basic cable/satellite package... you decided you wanted even more.

      • >> What you used to get over the air, you can still get over the air, for free.

        Not true. Some of the content you can no longer get over the air includes sporting events and recent movies. Those items have largely moved to cable TV.
    • by hondo77 ( 324058 )

      When there is no way to catch up on missed episodes the only choice is pirated or stop watching altogether.

      You could always wait for the missed episodes become available. I know, I know, that would involve delayed gratification...

      I'm not exactly poor but I'd never ordinarily pay $1.99 just to watch one episode of one show.

      Ah, so you're just cheap. And the content companies have themselves to blame for that because...?

    • Yeah. We have a Netflix subscription, Amazon Prime and an expensive Dishnetwork bundle. You'd think with all that there'd never be a need to stream from anywhere else.... nope. DVR missed some episodes of a TV show a month or more ago and you just now noticed? You can keep recording the new ones, but no way to watch the old ones but to find an "illegal" stream online.

      At some point the video content creators need to figure out that people who've paid for their content at least once just want to be able to co

  • Flawed Study (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BenFranske ( 646563 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:06PM (#54008275) Homepage

    This study is so obviously flawed in methodology it's laughable. Clearly this is just a bunch of propaganda. First, if you're surveying people around the world you also need to determine what licensed streaming services the person has access to as not all (or even any) services are available in all countries. Second, you need to consider the differences in the catalogs of licensed services from country to country. Because of antiquated business practices and agreements the catalog of Netflix (for example) varies greatly from place to place. In most places it's much worse than the US, which isn't even that great. Third, the study makes the assumption that simply viewing pirated content is in fact illegal (and they report about this with a leading statement, Did not know that simply watching....). While this may be true in some regions globally there is certainly some disagreement about whether only distribution is unlawful or whether consumption is also unlawful. This really smells like media industry propaganda to me.

    • by Zemran ( 3101 )
      It is extremely flawed. In the US downloading may be illegal but in most countries it is a civil offence. You may be sued but not arrested. Where I live there is no choice. There are no DVD shops for rental or purchase. There is no cable. As a US citizen you assume that I can buy something through the post because you lack the experience to imagine what life is like in the rest of the world. I do not have an address. The post office will steal anything of value. One thing they will not do is deliver
  • Why I pirate? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Easy, I am in Québec and want to watch Walking Dead in French? Nope, AMC seems to have refused to sale the rights to French Canadian TV, so I wait for it to be showned in France/Belgium/whatever and torrent it.
    Best comedy serie ever? Married With Children of course, cannot find it in French in Canada, even in DVDs, so torrent it goes.
    Repeat for a lot of things dubbed in French and unavailable by any legal meaning in Canada.
    • What's baffling is the lack of french dubbed content on Netflix Canada. According to 2011 statistics, english is used by 58% of the population and french by 22%. So take the smaller-than-USA catalog, put only maybe 10% of it dubbed in french (most of the time there's not even french subtitles either) and that means Netflix Canada are losing at least 20% of potential customers.

  • by geekmux ( 1040042 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:16PM (#54008345)

    "48 (percent) said they would stop, or watch less illegal content after they were told about the damaging effects of piracy on the media industry."

    As movies continue to smash box office earnings records, and leading movie stars continue to justify obscene paychecks, I'd love to know how the MPAA is going to convey those "damaging" effects.

    Sure as shit doesn't seem like they're hurting, especially in the face of what appears to be rampant piracy.

  • by rtkluttz ( 244325 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:22PM (#54008419) Homepage

    I have sincerely tried to be legal. I bought HDHomeruns and cable cards so I could consume media in my linux environment legally on a DVR that has capability that is important to me and storage that lets me keep it as long as I want. But the cable co's are now encrypting to make cable on all but a few channels making it impossible for me to view on the platform of my choice. They are using encryption as a way to force you into a rental scenario. As for online streaming, I don't have fast enough internet to stream. I wouldn't even if I could. I will download on linux and view using the player of my choice or I'll work around the artificial crippling.

  • by irrational_design ( 1895848 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:25PM (#54008445)

    "damaging effects of piracy on the media industry"

    1. I believe children are damaged by the media industry.
    2. Therefore the media industry needs to go away.
    3. Piracy has a damaging effect on the media industry.
    4. I pirate media content because it is my moral obligation to damage the media industry - for the children.

    Well, that should totally hold up in court.

  • by jenningsthecat ( 1525947 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:25PM (#54008449)

    but they didn't provide ANY indication of the exact questions asked, how they chose potential respondents, how they rejected potential respondents, how many results they threw away and under what criteria - you know, any of the important stuff that would allow the reader to actually evaluate whether or not the conclusions drawn have even a chance of reflecting the real state of affairs. The 'article' is a blatant, crude, substanceless, hit-and-run propaganda piece, and any thinking person should either take its conclusions with a whole cupful of salt, or dismiss them out of hand.

  • If you give people a reasonable alternative to piracy I'd like to believe they would take it. Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon between them scratch my TV needs, although, with further fragmentation of the streaming market, I'm seriously considering reviewing the situation. I can't pay for EVERY channel that fragments off and wants its own subscriber base.

    When it comes to sport- I have to stream from grey-area sources. I'm sorry, I'm not paying for cable just to have sports- nor am I paying $60 a year just to wa

    • I really don't think so, if it's easy enough to steal, with a practically 0% chance of getting caught for said theft, people will do it.

      It does hurt the industry as well, why do you think so many develpers are are wary of PC gaming, piracy. So someone like me who does not steal, is denied access to stuff because of the people that are stealing. It sucks.

  • Tried Netflix and Prime. You expect to get anything and everything. But instead you get one decent show, a load of old movies you've already seen.

    Suddenly the most important thing is to remember to terminate subscription.

    Let me put it this way. I can only watch so much content. There's more content around than I'll ever watch. If I'll be allowed to choose out of everything then I'll come back.

    I think I might speak for one or two more.

  • Aside from not having "good" content on Netflix/Amazon/iTunes etc (aka be an appealing product) --- watching Pirated content fills the "Now" and "Cheap"

    I know multiple people who watch pirated content -- and Own a copy too -- only because the mechanism to watch said content is easier via the pirate tools. One person wants to watch on his phone when traveling (or some mobile device for the kids in the backseat) - but the copy he purchased on iTunes/Amazon can't be loaded onto said device. But the device

  • Seriously. There's more content than ever. We could use a culling mechanism, IMO, but piracy doesn't seem to be it.

    Now let's talk about the damaging effects of making sharing a crime.
  • I live in Finland and have tested all streaming services available here. Checked the scifi movies section on all of them and results were poor: HBO Nordic 5 movies, Viasat 13 movies and CMore 28. Netflix had similar selection. And most of the movies were old, some so old that they were shown on TV. Selection on TV series was slightly better, but still I had watched all interesting shows during the first free month all these services offered. And I only watched 1-2 hours every now and then.

  • by Khashishi ( 775369 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @02:49PM (#54008647) Journal

    Most people around the world are poor, and they probably can't afford legitimate access to US video programming. Hollywood should be happy that foreigners are pirating their movies. It helps keep down competition from places like Bollywood. America benefits from exporting its culture abroad.

  • ...but I'm going to say it again: Convenience, convenience, convenience. The market always corrects when you try to impose artificial supply constraints, especially when demand is high.

    You'd think people would have learned from watching the music industry go through it's "head in the sand" phase.

  • If last year I watched a hundred pirated videos, and this year I watched two, this survey would say I still watch pirated video.

    And the list of people who think streaming pirate content isn't illegal would seem to include the UK trading standards - https://yro.slashdot.org/story/17/03/06/1958209/streaming-pirate-content-isnt-illegal-uk-trading-standards-says [slashdot.org]

    This survey is a streaming pile.

    • This survey is a streaming pile.

      streaming, huh? that means if i try to take the survey, i'll be told "This content is not available in your region."

      i wonder if i can torrent it?

  • Looks like maybe providers need to make the content available to those countries who are watching that "pirated" content.

    It really seems to me that this is more about content not being available, so people find ways to get it. While Netflix/Amazon may be available in some of those countries, do they get the full list of shows/movies, or just a pittance? I know it is likely due to copyright law restrictions, but that should serve as a wake up call that those restrictions are not helping the copyright holde

  • Despite Netflix and Amazon? They operate more and more the same way the rest of the industry operates, Netflix locks down content by region giving many regions only a tiny library and I am sure Amazon would do the same if they actually had a decent service to lock down. Those 2 have the abilities to lead the way and Netflix for a while even seemed to be trying but now they are just part of the problem.
  • by JustNiz ( 692889 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @03:38PM (#54008923)

    I'm guessing thats really because most of the people of the world still don't live in first-world countries with significant disposable income and high-bandwidth internet.

  • by nehumanuscrede ( 624750 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @03:47PM (#54008961)

    If folks have to resort to pulling content from frowned upon channels, Big Media has only themselves to blame.

    While Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and the like are cheap enough, the quality and lack of shows available to stream across them reflects their price. I cannot tell you how many times I've searched for a show I was interested in watching on Netflix, only to find out that it isn't available in the streaming catalog. I can't tell you how many times I've found a series I would like to watch, only to find out it's Season 3 and the first two seasons aren't there anymore :|

    When the MPAA / RIAA pull their heads out of their ass and realize the following:

    1) Make the content available across all platforms, not this exclusive bullshit we have now
    2) Make it reasonably priced, WITHOUT ADS ( don't f*ck this up, you'll sink the whole damn ship )
    3) Get rid of the GD geo-blocks. We don't need YOU telling us what YOU think WE should watch.

    You'll likely find the number of folks who resort to the Yarr-Matey versions will drop significantly and instead of bitching about the " Pirate Problem ", you can instead focus on your real issue.

    That being the creation of quality content that folks actually want to watch.

  • I won't buy DRM shows at any price. I want to manage my shows in the player of my choice and I don't want to worry about losing access. I've been burned on this before when I bought a show to watch at the airport and lost access to it when I left the country. At 1.99 a pop I'd pay for a few worthwhile things, and 99 cents I'd be willing to buy a lot. But with DRM? Not a penny.
  • by thegarbz ( 1787294 ) on Thursday March 09, 2017 @04:29PM (#54009215)

    I'm struggling with how this is "despite" Netflix. These days I'm saying it's more because of Netflix. When Netflix started it was promising an alternative to the video rental model. Easy, online, full of popular content, right at your door. When they moved to streaming it was revolutionary, all the latest and greatest and a huge back catalogue giving the middle finger cable providers.

    Now?

    Now I struggle to see how Netflix is any different than owning cable. They mostly fill up their catalogue with their own self made content, content from others is sparse, content is not first to arrive on Netflix unless it's exclusive, and outside the USA let me just say the content is utter garbage. How garbage? Look for Australian TV shows in the USA, and then try and find the same shows on the Australian Netflix. Yes even the local content is harder to get locally on Netflix compared to the USA.

    So when people say despite Netflix people all over the world are pirating, I would say they would first need to put a bit of effort in before qualifying for the word "despite".

  • At least In the EU its legal to stream pirated content.
    http://www.digital-digest.com/... [digital-digest.com]

  • Here is why people choose pirated content:

    "Every movie you've ever searched for" is unavailable to stream. This title is available on Netflix DVD.
    -and-
    You can stream this, but we have non-skippable commercials poorly cut in and if you pause or seek it the episode will restart. Also, we use dumb buffering, so that every commercial causes the buffer to flush and you'll end up watching most of the video at 180p, not 1080p, quality.

  • I have amazon prime for shipping. I have relatives that live all over the US and it's very handy, as well as one day shipping when i need something (it's available in my area). the problem with Netflix remains content owners. Studios, lawyers and ISP's are trying to rob the last dollar from the American consumer (with the blessing Lord Trump) all the while the really good and NEW content is available for streaming in Foreign countries. There's zero reason foreign subscribers should have better content f
  • I believe that most people have found that pirated content is high quality and no ads, plus all those RSS feeds have been set up to automatically download shows a long time ago, well before Amazon and Netflix came to the party.
    So why switch from something high quality and ad free?

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