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Privacy EU Facebook Social Networks

WhatsApp, Gmail Roped Into Tougher EU Privacy Proposal (reuters.com) 36

Online messaging and email services such as WhatsApp, iMessage and Gmail will face tough new rules on how they can track users under a proposal presented by the European Union executive on Tuesday. From a report: The web players will have to guarantee the confidentiality of their customers' conversations and ask for their consent before tracking them online to serve them personalized ads. The proposal by the European Commission extends some rules that now only apply to telecom operators to web companies offering calls and messages using the internet, known as "Over-The-Top" (OTT) services, seeking to close a perceived regulatory gap between the telecoms industry and mainly U.S. Internet giants such as Facebook, Google and Microsoft.
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WhatsApp, Gmail Roped Into Tougher EU Privacy Proposal

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  • by victorsosa ( 3710383 ) on Tuesday January 10, 2017 @10:26AM (#53641669)
    These are good rules example to play fair. Everybody need to start copying this law too. Big services need to guarantee the confidentiality of their customers' conversations
  • by Mhrmnhrm ( 263196 ) on Tuesday January 10, 2017 @10:35AM (#53641731)

    ... Well, we'd love to comply with your potentially-lawful request and EU-search-warrant-equivalent, but in order to comply with your conversation confidentiality and privacy rules, we had to create encryption schemes designed from the very start to be unbreakable because we don't have the keys, nor a way to download them.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 10, 2017 @10:40AM (#53641777)

      What's wrong with that? Privacy is much more important than the ability for law enforcement to read conversations, especially if creating that ability involves creating lots of potential for abuse.

      • So says the anonymous coward who would let his grocery store compile complete purchase history of food and medications so that he can get 25 cents off a loaf of bread. Most people don't place much value on their privacy. Those who do, usually are not the target market demographic for these products.
    • You passed the test. Carry on.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Encryption doesn't protect metadata though. They still use central servers to coordinate clients and pass messages through firewalls etc. Metadata is often worse than exposing the actual content, and in this case they would know the times when people spoke, the frequency of messages, who their contacts are and so forth.

    • Would you be happy for the police, military, govt. security agencies, and 3rd party contractors to hold the keys to your home, car, work, etc. and to be able to sneak in and snoop around any time they feel like it? That'd include some very creepy geeks going through your wife/girlfriend's and children's personal belongings without any oversight or accountability.
  • by allo ( 1728082 ) on Tuesday January 10, 2017 @10:45AM (#53641809)

    Will we get banners "with visiting the site, you accept that everything you do is monitored and stored forever in the archives of google and the NSA"? Or do they actually ask for consent and accept a no?

    • Will we get banners "with visiting the site, you accept that everything you do is monitored and stored forever in the archives of google and the NSA"? Or do they actually ask for consent and accept a no?

      Of course they accept a no answer! You can trust them. Honesty is rampant online. Your privacy is 100 percent safe.

    • by kqs ( 1038910 )

      I'm pretty sure you already said yes when you signed up for gmail. But I'm sure there will be a new one-time banner, which says "if you select no, then since you no longer agree to our terms of service we'll freeze your account." Which seems reasonable.

      Or you can pay Google $5/month/user for Google Apps account which lets you have email without ads. Which also seems reasonable.

      • by allo ( 1728082 )

        I never said "yes" to certain news sites, which informed me, that visiting them was giving my consent to cookies, which were set before i even had the chance to read the message.

  • by Luthair ( 847766 ) on Tuesday January 10, 2017 @10:55AM (#53641871)

    Can We Track You

    Yes | Delete Account

  • If only you are seeing the ads, are targeted ads an invasion of privacy?

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