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China Businesses Privacy Security

China Adopts Controversial Cybersecurity Law; Experts Say It Will Hurt Businesses (techcrunch.com) 61

The Chinese government today passed new cybersecurity regulations that will put stringent new requirements on technology companies operating in the country. The proposed Cybersecurity Law comes with data localization, surveillance, and real-name requirements. From a TechCrunch report:The regulation would require instant messaging services and other internet companies to require users to register with their real names and personal information, and to censor content that is "prohibited." Real name policies restrict anonymity and can encourage self-censorship for online communication. The law also includes a requirement for data localization, which would force "critical information infrastructure operators" to store data within China's borders. According to Human Rights Watch, an advocacy organization that is opposing the legislation, the law does not include a clear definition of infrastructure operators, and many businesses could be lumped into the definition. "The law will effectively put China's Internet companies, and hundreds of millions of Internet users, under greater state control," said Sophie Richardson, Human Rights Watch's China director. HRW maintains that, while many of the regulations are not new, most were informal or only laid out in low-level law -- and implementing the measures on a broader level will lead to stricter enforcement.
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China Adopts Controversial Cybersecurity Law; Experts Say It Will Hurt Businesses

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  • Finally, China (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 07, 2016 @12:17PM (#53229951)

    Finally, China has caught up to the USA in anti-privacy and censorship. Congrats, China.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    How is this so different from what the US government says they need to do to "keep us safe"? This is one argument against backdoors in the US. If our government can mandate this, other countries can mandate them. You could even make the argument that China is being more open about what they are doing.

    • by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Monday November 07, 2016 @12:38PM (#53230093)

      How is this so different from what the US government says they need to do to "keep us safe"?

      Ah yes, the old "Everybody does it" fallacy ... and from an AC, which is illegal in China. Look, America has some government overreach, but we have no "real name" requirement, there are no "prohibited" topics, and data localization is not required. The objectives as well as the methods differ: America's monitoring is designed to catch bad guys, not to suppress discussion or prevent the flow of information.

      • by Altrag ( 195300 )

        no "real name" requirement

        No, just enough metadata hanging around to make the requirement trivial anyway. At least with an explicit real name requirement, the user knows they're probably being tracked and spied on. Not that that's much solace.

        no "prohibited" topics

        No, just topics that will get you sent to gitmo, or sued out of existence (though that's more done by shady companies than the government.) Still, not technically prohibited.

        data localization is not required

        True, though this is by far the most benign issue on the list, and in some ways non-localized data is a risk as well (

      • The American government handles such matters with secret orders and NSA letters. Do you really think ALL the American companies chose to mandate real name policies at the same time? The censorship is done in secret, so the sheep won't complain.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      How is this so different from what the US government says they need to do to "keep us safe"?

      It is different because people in the U.S. talk about policies that require real names, and even about censoring, while in China the government has implemented real name policies and censorship.

      There is a big difference between random people talking about something, and a government actuallly doing it.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    ... issues censorship laws. News at 11.

  • Lopsided (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tablizer ( 95088 ) on Monday November 07, 2016 @12:43PM (#53230139) Journal

    I don't know why we don't tariff these guys. We readily allow their products and services in, yet they put up barriers to our software and services, creating lopsided trade. If we keep giving in, they'll keep doing it.

    • I don't know why we don't tariff these guys. We readily allow their products and services in, yet they put up barriers to our software and services, creating lopsided trade. If we keep giving in, they'll keep doing it.

      Because standard economic theory, the stuff you would have learned in Economics-101, says that protectionism and tariff wars always hurt both parties.

      • by ADRA ( 37398 )

        So complete supplication to an authoritarian regime is the better policy? Well fuck lets lift all the trade restrictions on North Korea / Russia / Syria, etc.. What could the possible consequences possibly be? Commerce and trade clearly trumps any other possible outcomes.

      • by Tablizer ( 95088 )

        Economics-101, says that protectionism and tariff wars always hurt both parties.

        As others pointed out, theory and practice are often different.

        For one, lopsided trade will result in lopsided cash flow, which may result in bubbles, as excess cash in narrow sectors often does. Economists still haven't figured out how to prevent bubbles, even after 400 years of them. Thus, their theories are missing some pieces or their cows are too spherical.

        And Japan has some of the lowest unemployment rates in the world de

    • by Altrag ( 195300 )

      There's a huge difference between a product like cheap knock-off toys and an information service like Google.

      One is personalized, the other isn't. I'm sure the Chinese would have absolutely no problem buying American products like clothing and DVDs.. except they have no reason to do so since they make all that shit themselves at a fraction of the cost of US producers (and then sell it to us since much of it is produced under license from US or at least western-based companies because again.. fraction of th

  • And we're handing control of the Internet to countries with views like this? The globalist view (i.e. "we're all equals and friends; we need to trust each other to work together for all people...") on some topics is truly naive...
  • by ( 4621901 )

    It needs a real name, hmm...

    me:(Type in Mark Zuckerberg)
    Web: Register failed... There are already 38546 Mark Zuckerberg registered.
    me: Damn it!

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