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Piracy Entertainment Your Rights Online

Swedish ISP Vows to Protect Users From a Piracy Witch Hunt (torrentfreak.com) 45

Ernesto Van der Sar, reporting for TorrentFreak: Swedish Internet service provider Bahnhof says it will do everything in its power to prevent copyright holders from threatening its subscribers. The provider is responding to a recent case in which a competing ISP was ordered to expose alleged BitTorrent pirates, reportedly without any thorough evidence. At the birth ground of The Pirate Bay, media outfit Crystalis Entertainment received permission from the court to identify several BitTorrent users, based on their IP-addresses. The case, which could be the first of many, was filed against the local ISP TeliaSonera who handed over the requested information without putting up much of a fight. This prompted the competing Internet provider Bahnhof to issue a warning. The company notes that the copyright holder in question doesnâ(TM)t have a very strong case, and it criticizes Telia for caving in too easily.
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Swedish ISP Vows to Protect Users From a Piracy Witch Hunt

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  • (shakes head) (Score:5, Insightful)

    by wierd_w ( 1375923 ) on Monday April 25, 2016 @03:20PM (#51985105)

    Seriously,

    While I applaud this ISP for waking up and smelling the sewer, this is what happens when unfettered power is given to any group of people with an interest and a will to enforce it against others.

    You can think about it this way:

    The copyright holders and their shell organizations were initially granted a boon from society in exchange for continuing to produce new works. This boon gave them legitimate grounds to assert that society owed them something. This initial boon was not enough for them though, and through various methods, they have incrementally demanded, and obtained more and more from society, and society so far has accepted the increased demands.

    We are now to the point where the demands are absurd.

    The copyright holders and their satelites act like you are trying to put them into a sweatshop if you suggest that they have overstepped what they are actually owed by society, while simultaneously taking unilateral and extrajudicial action against society to obtain what it wants.

    I propose that the next time they demand copyright reform, we give it to them, but actually reform it so that this abusive relationship is properly reset and expectations are forced back into the realm of reality.

    Writing a book does not make you entitled to a heredetary estate. The purpose of copyright is to keep your lights on, your bills paid, and food on your table so that you can continue to write. Nothing more. It is not a free ride for either you or your children. It is not providence for limitless profits by a corporate body either, and any corporation profiting from copyright is going against the foundational concept of copyright as an allowance between authors and the rest of society. (EG, to extract a profit from the situation resulting from properly maintained copyright allowances, the corporations would have to be taking food off the author's table, and making him unable to pay his bills, because that is all the more copyright protections should be providing to authors.)

    The actions of this ISP are laudible, but it is too little, too late on that front.

    What needs to happen is for the copyright cartels to get busted into the stoneage for vigilanteism, racketeering, and barratry, followed by REAL copyright reform.

    • We are now to the point where the demands are absurd.

      Since the days of Gutenberg.. Every new technology restarts the cycle, keeps the game alive.

      What needs to happen is for the copyright cartels to get busted into the stoneage for vigilanteism, racketeering, and barratry, followed by REAL copyright reform.

      The process for that is extremely clear and simple. It starts with us, and our votes.

      • Re:(shakes head) (Score:5, Insightful)

        by U2xhc2hkb3QgU3Vja3M ( 4212163 ) on Monday April 25, 2016 @03:38PM (#51985213)

        The process for that is extremely clear and simple. It starts with us, and our votes.

        It's not that clear and is far from simple, because in most countries the political system is now included lobbying, which used to be called bribery and used to be illegal.

        You cannot fight corporations anymore because they have more money than you and it's legal for them to outright "buy out" politicians.

        • So what? Stop reelecting corrupt politicians. The voters choose who gets on the ballot. They really should quit their bellyaching. They make the system what it is. There is no one else to blame, but apparently that won't stop anybody from doing it anyway.

        • When there is less power in general, the damage of corruption cannot go as far. That is, if the government itself is restricted in size and scope, it's much more difficult to abuse. Thus, a smaller (cheaper) and weaker government might be a good idea.
          • The government, no matter how "big" it gets, has but one problem, lack of oversight by the voters. You have seen a giant mass of starlings turn on a dime [youtube.com], there is no reason people can't do that with mere thought. Every two years we can vote out the entire House with only a desire. But the brain appears to be made of molasses, so, here we are.

      • We don't get to vote on just one policy. People aren't going to vote for Vlad the Impaler just because he promises to bust the copyright cartel.

        • *sigh* The hoops people jump through to pass blame. It's amazing to watch. The worst part is that it is such normal behavior.

    • The copyright holders and their shell organizations were initially granted a boon from society in exchange for continuing to produce new works. This boon gave them legitimate grounds to assert that society owed them something.

      All they're asking for is that their works not be stolen. In many cases, this is legitimate. I have trouble caring about it in the case of mass media, who are not concerned with long-term interests so much as selling trivial products on the basis of novelty. It would be a positive thi

      • by mlts ( 1038732 ) on Monday April 25, 2016 @03:47PM (#51985281)

        In the past, it was legitimate. Don't copy media, sell it as theirs (as counterfeiting is truly theft.) However, as time has gone on, the bar for IP infringement has gone so low, that with the TTIP, some guy dressing up as Spiderman for a local comic convention can be hit with a six digit fine or prison term. Couple this with the Draconian technological enforcement (more than four people in front of an XBox, movie shuts off), and the spirit of the law has been destroyed. In the past, it was a copyright monopoly for "x" time, then it becomes public domain, for all to use.

        The problem is that with extreme punishments (hundreds of millions of dollars for a few MP3 files), people start to have less respect for laws in general, and this not just affects IP law, but law and order as a gestalt.

        In the early 2000s, had the RIAA not used heavy handed tactics, but went with tactics that MADD has used to sway public opinion, making the concept of copying MP3s for someone as odious as hitting the road after seven longnecks, things likely would be a lot different.

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          Encrypt and share. Undermine copyright, make it irrelevant.

        • However, as time has gone on, the bar for IP infringement has gone so low, that with the TTIP, some guy dressing up as Spiderman for a local comic convention can be hit with a six digit fine or prison term. Couple this with the Draconian technological enforcement (more than four people in front of an XBox, movie shuts off), and the spirit of the law has been destroyed. In the past, it was a copyright monopoly for "x" time, then it becomes public domain, for all to use.

          It seems to me that what you are sayin

        • by houghi ( 78078 )

          Several years ago I saw a letter from the countries (Belgium) legal system to the countries MPAA that said basically: If you have somebody that is making money from copies, we will help you. If you go after people who share, we will not be happy you are wasting our time.

          The providers did not cooperate as they said to the MAFIAA: we will NOT give you the data from user X, because that is agains the law to share without a court order.

          So what happens now is not much. The pirates that get caught are those that

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Seriously,

      While I applaud this ISP for waking up and smelling the sewer

      Hardly waking up just now, they have been battling with copyright trolls for over a decade.

      Here is a slashdot post about them from 2005:
      Anti-Piracy Bureau of Sweden Planted Evidence [slashdot.org]

  • by Spacelord ( 27899 ) on Tuesday April 26, 2016 @07:36AM (#51988499)

    Or you can pay like $3 a month for a good VPN service and be done with it.

    Additional bonus is that it offers extra privacy and the ability to bypass silly regional restrictions on some websites.

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