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Government The Almighty Buck

HackingTeam's Global Export License Revoked 29

An anonymous reader writes: You might remember HackingTeam from an epic data leak back in July 2015. Now, the Italian Ministry of Economical Progress has revoked HackingTeam's licence to export their Galileo remote control software abroad, two years before it would expire, on April 30, 2018. Until the situation changes, HackingTeam will have to ask express permission for every single commercial operation that involves the sale of their Galileo system abroad.
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HackingTeam's Global Export License Revoked

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  • Seeya! (Score:4, Insightful)

    by sociocapitalist ( 2471722 ) on Wednesday April 06, 2016 @09:44AM (#51853013)

    Sounds like the perfect time for them to relocate.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Sounds like the perfect time for them to relocate.

      Except moving the code out of the country, even to another of their offices, would probably be considered an export, and the government would get to say NO. If they do it anyway and leave, since catching it would be near impossible, would open them to being arrested and extradited if they ever set foot in a country with an extradition treaty with Italy.

    • Sounds like the perfect time for them to relocate.

      It's a double edged sword. The Italian government was concerned that they were doing business with Azerbaijan, Egypt, etc., but also wasn't interfering the same way that a shadier government would.

    • by xrayspx ( 13127 )
      Alternatively, it may be time for them to commit to stop selling the tools of oppression to regimes like those in Syria, Egypt... Where there's a dictator, HT has a customer. [theintercept.com]
  • by Anonymous Coward

    The summary and TFA were no help at figuring out what exactly their software is.

  • Until the situation changes, HackingTeam will have to ask express permission for every single commercial operation that involves the sale of their Galileo system abroad.

    Or, they will simply move their operation elsewhere.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Reading the original article (in Italian): after having their global licence revoked, Hacking Team won't need to ask permission for every sale generically made "abroad", but only if they wish to sell their software to 46 specific countries.

  • I looked up their hipster web site [hackingteam.it] and was so repulsed by their brain-dead stupid eye-destroying low-contrast color scheme that I was instantly prejudiced against them. My snap impression was then reinforced by their stupid pandering column [hackingteam.it] on the San Bernardino iPhone controversy.

  • . . . .why the US office they were trying to set up, disappeared. And the only reason I know about the prospective US office, is that I was being recruited for it. . . and then it suddenly went silent. . .

  • Has to be political (Score:4, Interesting)

    by RevDisk ( 740008 ) on Wednesday April 06, 2016 @11:35AM (#51853819) Journal
    Once upon a time, when I was doing network security, I got thrown out of IT and into export control. They gave me enough money that I didn't quit. Logic was it was technical, byzantine and required insane attention to detailed regulation that'd make Cthulu go insane. Hey, infosec is virtually the same parameters.

    Short story long, generally the US has among the most byzantine and archaic export control regulation in use by first world countries, specifically ITAR. It's largely unchanged from the 1970's/1980's notion of 'high tech', so you get a lot of interesting stuff that ends up on the US munitions list. Europe in general doesn't have nearly the same level of export control, and gives a substantial advantage in the global defense contracting world.

    That said, many Euro defense contractors have extremely tight relations with their export licensing agency. They dance to the tune very closely, which does actually reduce the amount of legislation or regulation. As a government entity, why bind yourself with written rulings when your customers will do exactly what you tell them? I can very well imagine, and would be shocked to see otherwise, that any Euro export related tech organization that did not have extremely tight relations with their export licensing agency would be punished at least this harshly. Expect a LOT of foot dragging. Not enough for this company to win in court, just enough to cause them to lose business or go bankrupt.

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