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Adblock Fast Returns To Google Play a Week After Being Pulled 53

An anonymous reader writes: A week ago, Google suddenly removed Adblock Fast from its Android app store. Today, the ad blocker has been reinstated, enabling Samsung users to download it once again from Google Play. Late last month, the browser preinstalled on Samsung's Android phones gained support for content-blocking plugins, and the first plugin to support the functionality was a free and open-source solution called Adblock Fast. Rocketship Apps, the maker of Adblock Fast, uploaded the Android plugin on January 29, but Google rejected an app update on February 1. The app hit Google Play's top spot for free, new productivity apps on February 2, and was pulled by Google on the same day.
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Adblock Fast Returns To Google Play a Week After Being Pulled

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  • by The-Ixian ( 168184 ) on Tuesday February 09, 2016 @12:16PM (#51470689)

    Just to load the androidheadlines.com page... even on a full computer it takes forever to load.

    Anyway, Google is free to ban, pull, push, whatever any app they want... it's their store...

    • Who knows what is in their contracts with Samsung? Not I, said the little red hen.

      Samsung might have something in the contract akin to "By virtue of thy revenue that thou dost receive from the users of Our own devices, thou, O Google, shalt let Us distribute whatever We shall want in thy Play Store. Buhahahaha."

      Contracts between behemoths are generally closely held secrets.

    • Google IS currently free to do what they want. But should they be?

      I'd like to see alternate app stores become available, giving users a real choice. Yes, I know Amazon and Samsung have their own stores, but they are available only to users of their own branded devices. Of course, you can side-load apps, but then you open the door to all kinds of security issues. What I want is alternative stores that are completely integrated. THAT would give us some true competition, and maybe some better rates for d

      • Anyone can download the Amazon app store. Also try F-Droid. There are a lot of alternative stores, just not sure which are all that good.

        • The Amazon App Store is only available on Amazon-branded devices.

          From TechCrunch: "Google doesn’t allow competing app stores in the Play Store"

          http://techcrunch.com/2015/08/... [techcrunch.com]

          • Amazon's app store can be downloaded on any Android device (I just installed it on my Nexus 5X). And of course other stores aren't on Google Play That would be like Walmat allowing a Bestbuy to setup inside its walls -- but you most certainly can _use_ other stores.

            • You had to side-load it, right? That's the point, you can't install another App Store without side-loading, which is riskier than third-party app stores.

              And of course other stores aren't on Google Play That would be like Walmat allowing a Bestbuy to setup inside its walls

              The problem with you analogy is that Walmart (Google Play in your analogy) is the only store where you can "legally" shop. Every other store is considered "under the table" and "use at your own risk"--kind of like buying from the guy on the street corner in front of Walmart.

              A better analogy for what I would like Google Play to be, is a shopping mall. Lot

              • I agree more choice is good but I dont think it's fair to hold Google responsible for not providing their competition to you. And saying other stores are not available is just incorrect. I'm actually straining to think of some example where a store gives access to other stores (other than your ideal mall analogy). Apple has the same type of warning even on the desktop now. As long as the option is there I think it's fine. If they ever took that away though, it'd be time for pitchforks and torches.

              • The problem with you analogy is that Walmart (Google Play in your analogy) is the only store where you can "legally" shop. Every other store is considered "under the table" and "use at your own risk"--kind of like buying from the guy on the street corner in front of Walmart.

                A better analogy for what I would like Google Play to be, is a shopping mall. Lots of stores under one roof.

                That would make it impossible for Google to provide a safe space where users can download without having to be concerned about malware, unless Google were also vetting/managing the contents of all of those other stores... in which case, what's the point, since they'd all just be subsets of Google Play?

                In addition, as others have pointed out, there's a competitive element here. Google Play doesn't exist just because Google wants to provide a safe app store for Android (though Google does want that), it's a

      • Google IS currently free to do what they want. But should they be?

        I'd like to see alternate app stores become available, giving users a real choice. Yes, I know Amazon and Samsung have their own stores, but they are available only to users of their own branded devices. Of course, you can side-load apps, but then you open the door to all kinds of security issues. What I want is alternative stores that are completely integrated. THAT would give us some true competition, and maybe some better rates for developers.

        So you want the security of a Walled Garden and the ability to load Apps from every back-alley website, too?

        Sorry, doesn't work that way in REAL life.

        • Do you buy products from every back-alley Web site that offers merchandise for sale? No, probably not. You learn which ones can be trusted. Are there shady sites that try to scam you? Of course. Should we have only one Store where you buy things, to make sure you stay safe? Hardly.

          • Do you buy products from every back-alley Web site that offers merchandise for sale? No, probably not. You learn which ones can be trusted. Are there shady sites that try to scam you? Of course. Should we have only one Store where you buy things, to make sure you stay safe? Hardly.

            Mobile devices are an exception to the rule, and for very good reason.

    • by Karlt1 ( 231423 )

      " if Google did not act, we faced a Draconian future, a future where one man, one company, one device, one carrier would be our only choice. So if you believe in openness, if you believe in choice, if you believe in innovation from everyone, then welcome to Android. Now let's get started"

      Andy Rubin......

  • by jc42 ( 318812 ) on Tuesday February 09, 2016 @12:22PM (#51470767) Homepage Journal

    It's widely believed that ads have taken over (from porn ;-) as the main traffic on the Web. This is rather significant if even close to true, it's likely one of the main reasons that our handy little portable gadgets (that many of us hardly ever actually use as phones) run so slowly and eat up so much bandwidth.

    But a problem with even discussing this is that, as far as I've found, there's no reliable app available to actually measure our bandwidth use, classify it, and tell us what's eating it up. I do know that my android gadget is often running warm, eating batter and bandwidth, when it's just sitting "idle" in my pocket.

    Yeah, I know; part of that is the tracking software. ;-) But whatever; I can't really say with any authority what's causing its activity. The one thing I can actually see is apps that stay running in the background, and the gadget's power usage app does report that "innocent" apps like mail/message readers and web browsers are using battery when "nothing is happening". Investigating does often show that some of their windows contain video ads that are running. The power-usage app does let me kill apps, but that's not very useful in measuring the source of the power/bandwidth usage.

    So is there a good way to actually measure the traffic, classify it, etc., so we can actually determine what's really eating up the battery and bandwidth? Are there good google keywords to learn about it? There are a few good unix/linux tools for examining network traffic, but I haven't found them for android, ios, etc. Anyone know what they might be, and how we might verify that they're not just trojans?

    (And yes, I'm also aware that the marketers are going to read this and be major sources of replies that try to reassure us without answering anything. Maybe we can moderate them down? ;-)

    • by Anonymous Coward

      How do you categorize the porn ads?

      • by jc42 ( 318812 )

        How do you categorize the porn ads?

        Well, to my knowledge, I don't actually have any porn on my android gadget. (My Macbook has a much larger screen. ;-) But I'd expect that those who do, would find it interesting and useful to know how much of their porn apps' traffic and battery usage is from the ads. The marketers do have a way on inserting their stuff into all sorts of places where it isn't welcome. They're probably even worse than the porn vendors that way.

        In any case, the question is general: How do we reliably find out what stu

    • It's widely believed that ads have taken over (from porn ;-) as the main traffic on the Web.

      I think it's pretty well-established that the majority of traffic on the Internet is from streaming video. Netflix and YouTube together comprise a huge majority of traffic. Maybe you're considering that traffic to be "Internet", not "Web", even though it's reached/triggered largely through web sites? That seems like a difficult distinction to draw in a non-arbitrary way. I suppose you could say the web is anything retrieved by an HTTP request, and video uses different protocols once the player has been retr

  • At this rate, you just simply could keep up with this stuff
  • You can have your ad-blocker back! Our Advertisers have had time to review it, find work arounds, and will be adjusting their revenue streams accordingly.

    Additional ads may now be implanted into your program.

    We appreciate your addition to our revenue!

  • To discuss Google pulling the app from the store. Looks l like Samsung prevailed in the discussion.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    We are witnessing the transition into a new era, made possible by the saturated of "walled garden" platforms and corporate curated software markets.

    If nothing is done, in 5 years time the vast majority of users will be unable to even install ab-blockers, let alone use them. In 10 years time, ad blockers may be de-facto banned across the vast majority of the web anyway, with sites refusing access to browsers detected to have ad blocking software installed. This is already happening across some sites even now

    • I sideload AdAway and see no ads anywhere on my phone. If they do away with that option then I'll push it through and, and if that fails then I'll flash it.

"You show me an American who can keep his mouth shut and I'll eat him." -- Newspaperman from Frank Capra's _Meet_John_Doe_

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