Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×
Crime Social Networks The Courts The Media

Former Reuters Media Editor Found Guilty of Helping Anonymous Hack Into LA Times (twitchy.com) 36

An anonymous reader writes: Prolific tweeter and former Reuters social media editor Matthew Keys, charged with computer hacking under the Computer Fraud & Abuse Act, was found guilty today on all counts and faces up to 25 years in prison when sentenced in January. Wired reports: "According to authorities, during a recorded FBI interview with Keys in October 2012 at his home, prior to his indictment, he admitted to his involvement in the hacking of the L.A. Times, and to sending a series of disparaging, sometimes threatening e-mails to a former employer. Keys waived his Miranda rights at the time of the interview and was concerned that the case not be publicized, apparently believing he might get off as a cooperating witness."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Former Reuters Media Editor Found Guilty of Helping Anonymous Hack Into LA Times

Comments Filter:
  • Seems appropriate (Score:4, Insightful)

    by The-Ixian ( 168184 ) on Thursday October 08, 2015 @02:04PM (#50687723)

    They guy admitted to breaking the law...

    In other news, a guy goes to jail after admitting to B&E...

    • by Anonymous Coward

      25 years is disproportionate punishment to the crime though

      • by tomhath ( 637240 )

        It's unlikely he'll serve that much time.

        But the punishment might be appropriate, depending on how much it cost the company to recover from the hack. Typically something like that ends up costing the victim tens of thousands of dollars; it's the same as if he stole that much money or torched someone's car.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          So how much did the banksters and politicians cost the citizens over their past few decades of rampant theft? Seems like they should be going away for a few millennia each.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    He snitched on himself. And got what he deserved.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Never talk to cops! https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]
    • by fyngyrz ( 762201 ) on Thursday October 08, 2015 @02:58PM (#50688137) Homepage Journal

      Yes, if you really did something bad, it needs to be addressed.

      No, the system cannot be counted on to address it proportionally or responsibly.

      No, you should not ever, and I mean ever, freely converse about anything within the context of our (note USA-centric presumption) current legal system. A lawyer should do that. You can make your situation much, much worse in very short order with as little as one "yes" or "no." Worse in a context where "worse" can be far more severe than anything that was actually appropriate.

      Confine your responses to politely agreeable responses to specific commands for compliance WRT your custody from the officers. Anything else: "That will have to be addressed to my lawyer, sir." First thing -- and the only thing -- you really need to say, politely, contextually, WRT to any accusations or charges, is "Lawyer."

      When they say, as they almost certainly will, that your compliance with them may ease your penalties, you say "Thank you, I understand that, and will convey that to my lawyer as soon as possible." Nothing else. Nothing. Until you do, in fact, discuss it with your lawyer.

  • by brec ( 472981 ) on Thursday October 08, 2015 @02:11PM (#50687771) Homepage

    Bad Reporting on Matthew Keys' Possible Sentence Conceals Prosecutorial Power [popehat.com]

    TLDR: In almost all cases, definitely including this one, the maximum possible sentence is entirely irrelevant to the sentence that will be actually imposed.

    • by cdrudge ( 68377 )

      Good to see another Popehat fan. As soon as I saw the article I looked for the "faces up to 25 years" and was going to post the same thing.

    • In almost all cases, definitely including this one, the maximum possible sentence is entirely irrelevant to the sentence that will be actually imposed.

      Thanks for giving some deeper insight into this story. The real headline is not what the Reuters guy did, but how out-of-control the federal prosecutors have become.

      At worst, what this guy did was vandalism.

      • Harassment?

        and to sending a series of disparaging, sometimes threatening e-mails to a former employer.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          Keys is a SJW. I wonder how long his support would last if the person that received those threats happens to be a woman? And given that Keys supposedly had an in with Anonymous (he was a source both for a Gawker Anonymous article and a book about Anonymous by a Forbes writer), what other shit did he manage to get Anonymous to do for him?

      • In almost all cases, definitely including this one, the maximum possible sentence is entirely irrelevant to the sentence that will be actually imposed.

        Thanks for giving some deeper insight into this story. The real headline is not what the Reuters guy did, but how out-of-control the federal prosecutors have become.

        At worst, what this guy did was vandalism.

        If you break into some place in order to vandalize it, expect to be sentenced the same as any burglar. If you want to be sentenced as a vandal, vandalize something you can reach from the sidewalk.

        That said, I'm not convinced the true damages were over the $5000 needed to be federal. In my State I would expect a class C felony though. Except that local prosecutors would be scared to charge a media guy.

  • He allegedly encouraged the hackers to use the credentials to âoego fuck some shit up.â

    And, really, if that was his attitude, he gets no sympathy.

    In terms of the definition of "computer fraud and abuse", that's pretty much it.

    Of course, the problem is you could do a LOT of non-digital crimes and do a LOT less time, which makes me ask if these prison sentences are even sane.

    Hell, you could probably intentionally run down someone with your car and do less prison time.

  • protip (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rmdingler ( 1955220 ) on Thursday October 08, 2015 @02:22PM (#50687849) Journal
    Waving one's Miranda rights in "hopes of getting off as a cooperating witness" is an ill advised legal maneuver.
  • "Keys waived his Miranda rights at the time of the interview and was concerned that the case not be publicized, apparently believing he might get off as a cooperating witness."

    I think that means "he would rather that the case not be publicized but was worried it would be" and not "he was worried because he didn't think the case would be publicized and he thought it ought to be", but i'm not entirely sure.
  • by vvaduva ( 859950 ) on Thursday October 08, 2015 @03:09PM (#50688239)

    And this is why you never talk to cops without a lawyer present. Ever.

    Ever.

    • I think the real lesson should be this is why you never allow a random group of internet users to use your password from a previous position to enter website that isn't yours.
      • Ironically, you cannot have the one (cops) without the other (internet exploit).

        So, it is not the chicken or the egg so much as it is the fowl and the hard-shelled organic vessel where an embryo develops.

"We want to create puppets that pull their own strings." -- Ann Marion "Would this make them Marionettes?" -- Jeff Daiell

Working...