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Piracy Crime Government United States

Sharebeast, the Largest US-based Filesharing Service, Has Its Domain Seized 122

An anonymous reader writes: The RIAA says that the FBI has seized the domain of file-sharing service ShareBeast, shutting down what it said was responsible for the leaks of thousands of songs. The site now only displays a notice saying the FBI acted "pursuant to a seizure warrant related to suspect criminal copyright infringement." In a statement, RIAA CEO Cary Sherman called the seizure "a huge win for the music community and legitimate music services. ShareBeast operated with flagrant disregard for the rights of artists and labels while undermining the legal marketplace."
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Sharebeast, the Largest US-based Filesharing Service, Has Its Domain Seized

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  • who? (Score:3, Funny)

    by ganjadude ( 952775 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @07:27PM (#50515735) Homepage
    never heard of um.
    • Ayup. If some domain that has never made a top 10 list of torrent search engines is the best they can do, then I have to wonder how many millions of $$$ and hours of manpower they're wasting on useless BS.

      Maybe TPB and other sites should set up some honeypots to attract the attention of the feds? Sounds like a few hundred $$$ invested will result in a few million $$$ wasted. Asymmetrical warfare and all that :)
      • by Anonymous Coward

        "then I have to wonder how many millions of $$$ and hours of manpower they're wasting on useless BS."

        Don't worry, they'll just claim it as lost profits to "piracy".

      • Don't worry, they'll make sure the money they take from the artists to stymie this flagrant disregard for artists' right to fair compensation will not be in vain.
    • Re:who? (Score:4, Informative)

      by The_Laughing_God ( 253693 ) on Monday September 14, 2015 @12:37AM (#50516757)

      I found myself asking the same thing, so I checked Alexa (I'm certain there are better sites to check these days). It was rated #8546 worldwide (#9215 in US) in a fairly steady decline since its peak around #4250 in November of last year. Those are "okay" but unimpressive numbers, and it's pretty much been steadily dying. By comparison, a specialty news site like torrentfreak.com is #3808 globally (#3012 US) and reaches the top 2000 when stuff is hitting the fan.

      Sharebeast's user base (by IP) was 25.7% US, but 21.4% Indonesian. UK (5.3%), India (4.7%), and Saudi Arabia (4%) also had "significant" shares. The most popular search terms leading to it are not English terms.

      Source: http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/... [alexa.com]

      As I said, I'm sure that there are better sites for domain metrics these days, and I can't even see most data Alexa lists because I don't have an Alexa Pro acct. I'd welcome better data from anyone who monitors domain metrics regularly/professionally.

      But it really doesn't look like the Feds took down any sort of powerhouse, more like a dying target of convenience (unless they were really worried about Indonesian piracy)

      (Incidentally, I was surprised to see Alexa report that slashdot.org (#1672 globally, #1272 in US) gets 40.6% of its visitos from India (where it ranks #302) but only 29.4% from the US)

      • Incidentally, I was surprised to see Alexa report that slashdot.org (#1672 globally, #1272 in US) gets 40.6% of its visitors from India (where it ranks #302) but only 29.4% from the US.

        Do you guys eat soy burgers more, or something else? (patties made from wheat, almonds, peas, etc?) If one of you ever visits Canada, try the original Sol Cuisine burgers!

    • My thought's exactly when I read the title. Odd that they're the US's largest such service.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    More people over more time have shared music than tried to restrict it.

    And record labels have had "flagrant disregard" for the natural rights of musicians for quite some time now.

    If you're an artist and you want money, set up concerts. If you want more money, ask for people to pay directly to your bank account, or via a credit/debit card processor. No record label nor RIAA has anything to do with improving the music community.

    • by TWX ( 665546 )
      Back in the day a record label wasn't much of an entity. It was usually a local studio with the ability to master onto a viny record, and a record label would publish its literal catalog so that stores could order the records they wanted to try to sell. Contracts between musicians and the label were simple, though admittedly racism was quite ugly for non-white performers in those early days.

      I don't know if any singular event can be cited as when the relationship between labels and musicians went crazy,
      • by doccus ( 2020662 )

        Before the Beatles and The stones, where Allen Klein suddenly changed from a musician raper to a "record breaking deal maker" ..although, oddly enough, the artists saw no more out of these new deals than the old R&B acts he "represented" previously.. However, until then, you made a record to promote yourself. And, basically, to pay back the indentured sevitude you entered into when you signed a deal with any of the majors such as RCA, Warner or Atlantic. The smaller labels such as King RPM, or others

      • by adam525 ( 813427 )
        Then came the evolution where the record label was THE entity. The record label is responsible for A&R, promotion, marketing, getting the tape/vinyl/cd transferred to media, concert promotion, and on and on.

        The evolution I'm referring to here is probably the mid 60's to the late 90's (somewhere in there). There was actually a period in the middle of all that mess where the label wasn't constantly calling the artist saying "I'm not hearing a hit" or ""give me more cowbel"".
  • by Anonymous Coward

    ... is like tying a bloody steak to your dick and running through a pit of hungry lions; it only results in a razor-toothed fellatio.

  • by harryjohnston ( 1118069 ) <harry.maurice.johnston@gmail.com> on Sunday September 13, 2015 @07:36PM (#50515769) Homepage

    It's well past time the RIAA were shut down.

    Just how much is the music industry actually worth? I suppose there's no hope of crowdfunding enough to buy them out, but maybe if a few philanthropist billionaires were willing to help ...

    • by C0R1D4N ( 970153 )
      Google could afford to do it if they were willing to sell. Some of them may be able to be bought out individually or through a hostile takeover, others like Sony, who are part of a major conglamerate, you have to convince to actually sell. There's also the catch of the US Government probably trying to stop a company or anyone else from doing that. They might get away with it though if there were releasing it all into public domain as they bought it, since then there would be no monopoly for the FTC to stop.
  • by myowntrueself ( 607117 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @07:39PM (#50515783)

    wtf were they thinking?

    USA is probably the worst place to operate something like this.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Of course the US is the worst place to fileshare.
      And so is pretty much any other country.
      This is why you must move your filesharing to a place that is not subject to ANY jurisdiction... one that is NOT FINDABLE.
      Move your filesharing to the ANONYMOUS INTERNETS.

      The solution to the copyright/patent mess is to keep on sharing
      till their business model is completely destroyed.

      Start by ripping and sharing all the physical media you own.
      And do it over anonymous overlay networks such as I2P and Phantom.
      That way you

      • That way you can share 24x7x365 without fear of the MAFIAA.

        SOLAR SYSTEM NETWORK TRACE BEGINS. That 'year'=7year time span most closely corresponds to the orbital Synodic period [wikipedia.org] of near-Earth asteroid 99942 Apophis [wikipedia.org]. If you were actually located on Apophis you'd be using the Siderial period for measure. Therefore I assume you're probably just co-locating on Apophis, using a server whose clock-year tied to its relative position with Earth. At its closest pass [nasa.gov] of ~23,500 miles gives a fiber ping guesstimate [oneneck.com] of ~419ms ping under best-ever conditions on April 12, 2029. B

      • by pnutjam ( 523990 )
        I'll just leave this here, sig with link to a good vpn that supports torrenting (affiliate link, help a brother out..)
      • Don't waste people's time and quality by jerking them around with arbitrary format choices on your end, give them lossless and let them choose to downconvert on their own as they wish.

        It's funny because your own "arbitrary format choice" about using FLAC means more work to get a file I can use (AAC or ALAC) on OS X, iTunes, iPod and iPhone. Same thing about using a VOB directory vs a single m4v file.

        Not that I care anyway, because I'm a nice little citizen and I pay for my media because otherwise the people

    • by popo ( 107611 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @09:17PM (#50516103) Homepage

      But was the company actively involved in the illegal activity?

      It was it just some users.

      Because YouTube is also home to hundreds of thousands of pieces of pirated material on any given day.

      And my personal favorite copyright violation tool is Pinterest, whose entire business involves republishing and distributing copyrighted works.

      • The RIAA says that the FBI has seized the domain of file-sharing service ShareBeast, shutting down what it said was responsible for the leaks of thousands of songs.

        Yeah, how about arresting the RIAA employees and band reps who leak these songs out onto sharing sites to drum up interest in new groups or new albums from old bands?

      • Because YouTube is also home to hundreds of thousands of pieces of pirated material on any given day.

        I captured a video from Battle Field 3, flying the F-35. The F-35 has a warning tone when damaged, some company claimed rights to this sound; allowing them to place ads on that video (which as far as I can tell haven't done yet - but it sees little traffic).

        • by Raenex ( 947668 )

          I searched for this but came up empty. Could you post copyright notice you received?

          • I searched for this but came up empty. Could you post copyright notice you received?

            This is a hard request. I can't find the video on youtube so need to log into my youtube account, which I can't seem to do.

            Then it gets deeper; Google Domains and usage of Webtools under the same account hardwired (as in being routed) the two I use the most into one. I think I've lost control of the two accounts, I need to dig further.

            You'd be looking for Trax852 or II-Trax-II, remarks would mention "f-35 going under a bridge "Gulf of Ohman"" any DRM issues are addressed with that account; some icon gets yo

      • by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @11:24PM (#50516543) Journal

        But was the company actively involved in the illegal activity?

        Probably. To understand the legal arguments, the Limewire case [wikipedia.org] is instructive. Essentially to be guilty you need two things:

        1) Aid others in copyright infringement.
        2) Intend to do so.

        Youtube avoids guilt by providing several tools for copyright holders, and also by actively removing infringing movies. Thus although they are aiding infringers, you can't prove that's their intent. They don't have to be perfect at it, just good enough to avoid the legal standard.

        I don't know how Pinterest avoids copyright infringement lawsuits, but your characterization of their business model made me laugh: it's so true.

      • Fuck Pinterest, you can't view things unless you register.
    • I don't see evidence that they were HOSTING in the US, just that their domain was ".com". The COM top level domain is US, and the domain was seized, not the servers.

      If you know the IPs that the domain USED to point to, you can probably still use their system.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        No it isn't. The top level domains are INTERNATIONAL! Just because the TLD's are managed by an entity that lives in the US does NOT mean they are US. That is just an assumption that has been made by a lot of people, but you will find that a lot of non-US organisations use the TLD's if they operate internationally. the convention should be that you have a country specific suffix to indicate where you are based. I manage sites using both country specific and TLD's with one suffix pointing to the other.

        But bac

  • ...as if millions of Beiber fans suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.

    But really, hosting something like that in the U.S. was stupid. Who in that company didn't think that the MAFIAA wouldn't get the goverment to crush them like an ant at some point?

  • RIAA statement (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Kyogreex ( 2700775 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @08:07PM (#50515853)
    I find it interesting that the RIAA and other similar groups seem to have to comment on these things. I can't think of a single industry outside of the entertainment industry that's so congratulatory (and self-congratulatory) over the law coming down in their favour.
    • by TWX ( 665546 )
      When you're a monopoly or near-monopoly, as just about all American-distributing labels are a part of the RIAA, it doesn't matter how much you alienate people. Arguably being an umbrella-membership group there's even a bigger disconnect, since people won't necessarily associate a given band with even their label, let alone that label to the RIAA.

      Besides, the average person doesn't care.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      What i find interisting is they congratulate themselfs continuously for allowing security breachs on their production facilities to a point where the songs / videos are published in the pirated markets ahead of the normal markets.

  • ... a huge win for the music community and legitimate music services. ShareBeast operated with flagrant disregard for the rights of artists and labels while undermining the legal marketplace."

    Look, I agree that ShareBeast (first I've heard of it, though, so how big was it exactly?) was screwing over the artists. But the RIAA has just as much contempt for the artists as anyone - even more than pirates, since the pirates at least appreciate their works - and there's no end to the stories of hardworking musicians who've been bankrupted by RIAA execs with lots of big promises and lots of fine print in the contracts.

    Just sayin'... I expect a similar statement to be made about the RIAA and its me

  • by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @09:02PM (#50516059) Journal

    Who in their right mind would host a file-sharing site in the US? Why not just put on a pair of fake antlers and run around in the Wisconsin woods on the first day of deer season?

  • by K. S. Van Horn ( 1355653 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @10:05PM (#50516271) Homepage
    In a society in which rule of law held sway, it would not be possible for the FBI or any other governmental agency to simply seize a domain; Sharebeast would have to first be convicted of having broken a law that specified seizure of the domain as a possible penalty, or the RIAA would have to win some sort of civil suit against Sharebeast first.
    • by ihtoit ( 3393327 )

      when the real public backlash starts, they'll bring the plight of the children into it, compare anyone who disagrees with them to Hitler, accuse them of being Holocause deniers or climate change deniers, the usual discredit tactics loser trolls like to employ. Only they'll be using it to distract from the fact that yes, absent a bench warrant for seizure, the FBI did in fact break the Law by depriving an innocent concern of business by removing its ability to operate! And remember folks, in the United State

    • In this case the site itself is like a semi-truck full of stolen goods. It can be taken and then documented for the trial.

      A truck full of stolen goods would certainly be seized.

      The participants are innocent until proven guilty, but the assets regarding such prosecution can certainly be taken (look into asset forfeiture, it's a much more terrible version of this situation).

  • Can the FBI take over a company's retail shops, black out the windows, lock the doors and put up FBI seizure signs over it if they're suspected of criminal activity?

    I don't see how that's any different than taking a domain name.

    • by flink ( 18449 )

      Can the FBI take over a company's retail shops, black out the windows, lock the doors and put up FBI seizure signs over it if they're suspected of criminal activity?

      I don't see how that's any different than taking a domain name.

      The cops can seize real property (store front), inventory, and assets if a prosecutor can make a convincing case that they are part of an ongoing criminal enterprise: e.g. stolen goods, contraband, part of a money laundering operation. It's somewhat comparable to jailing a suspect prior to trial. You want to halt the suspected criminal activity and make sure the evidence doesn't disappear, so you "arrest" the property.

      Once a trial takes place if the business owner is cleared of charges, the property would

    • The copyright cartel has FAR better lobbyists, and essentially the FBI and DHS are now the ones who enforce these things.

      Getting DHS responsible for copyright enforcement (via ICE) means they can now pretty much do anything their corporate masters ask of them.

      Which is astounding since it means the US government now jumps at the call of multinational corporations. Which is a pretty sweet deal if you're a multinational corporation.

  • by MightyMartian ( 840721 ) on Sunday September 13, 2015 @11:17PM (#50516527) Journal

    ShareBeast operated with flagrant disregard for the rights of artists and labels while undermining the legal marketplace

    So a lot like RIAA's members then.

  • "[...]while undermining the legal marketplace."

    Isn't that SOP for every music label, when it comes to every other music label?

  • Are songs now secret?

  • I hate pirates. Everyone who works for a living should now celebrate the end of a sleezy website that stole from the working man and woman. Hip hhip hooray!
  • There are, of course, the legal ramifications (*cough*FourthAdmendment*cough*) regarding seizure without a court's say in the matter. (IANAL, etc, etc...)

    There is also the fact that those that really cared about this site probably know the site's IP, and with that in hand, who cares what they do with the domain? Add the IP to your local /etc/hosts file (or its Windoze equivalent), and you're golden.

    I'm pretty sure at this point that the RIAA (and MPAA for that matter) spend far more in legal fees from their delusions than they actually make in profits.

  • Okay, so the Feds seized the domain names. Why don't the pirates continue to operate with just their IP? Not that I'm advocating it. Just wondering.
  • > responsible for the leaks of thousands of songs
    So shut down the Internet.

    The associative chain of causality is but a tool for the powers that be to leverage at will.

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