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The Guardian Looks At Hacking Team's Client List, Internal Communications 35

There are lots of small but interesting news bits to take from the data dump made available by Wikileaks of internal documents from the Italian security firm Hacking Team, such as that a police unit investigating major crimes in Florida, according to some of the leaked emails, was interested in purchasing some of the company's surveillance technology. The Guardian has taken a longer look at the company's business and tactics, and outlines many of their actual and potential clients, in particular their government customers, and skewers Hacking Team's claims "that it does not sell to repressive regimes."

Shades of Blue Coat.
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The Guardian Looks At Hacking Team's Client List, Internal Communications

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  • by turkeydance ( 1266624 ) on Sunday July 12, 2015 @08:32AM (#50092557)
    which do not pay.
    • which do not pay.

      Thanks - now added to my new book "Things they don't tell you in Business Skool" (A Thousand and One Bleeding Obvious Things Managers should Know). Please post your banking details and I'll be pleased to deposit your contributors fee (tried earlier but I seem to have the wrong password).

      • by Anonymous Coward

        swoosh....

      • I'd actually buy that book, that's absolutely brilliant. A 1001 might be too many, maybe 101 unless your book is going to be huge. Still, this might be a best seller if done in a comedic way.
        • I'd actually buy that book, that's absolutely brilliant. A 1001 might be too many, maybe 101 unless your book is going to be huge. Still, this might be a best seller if done in a comedic way.

          Don't tell anyone - but market research showed bigger numbers sell better, and buyers never read more than the first ten pages as they only want to display it on their bookshelf. There's only 20 tips in the book - the rest of the pages are random quotes from Drucker written by a spam bot.

          Stay tuned to Oprah for next weeks big release. I'll be bundling the first 100 copies with the new "Super Managers Shorts" - they come with a "Power Memory Aid" (that's a small tag in the front of the underpants with your n

    • If they were worth what they charge they would be able to get their payments whether the client liked it or not.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    With the prevalence of systems being broken into by companies, law enforcement, automated systems, etc... Couldn't a person rightfully claim that whatever is on their computer could have been put there by someone else? If 10,000 people had a key to my house, I don't think I could claim that I have full control over it, why couldn't a criminal defendant claim the same thing? I think it is "beyond a reasonable doubt" that someone else may have full control over your computer.

    • by Cederic ( 9623 )

      A few years back someone successfully defending a child pornography related charge because malware on their PC created sufficient doubt regarding the provenance of the images.

      I think it is "beyond a reasonable doubt" that someone else may have full control over your computer.

      I don't think that's the case. However, forensic analysis of the computer and discovery of actual malware (rather than the strong likelihood of it) probably should suffice to create reasonable doubt.

      Of course, if the evidence is an email from you to the terrorist group, or a video of you raping the victim, or account details of multipl

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