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Businesses Government Transportation

Philippines Gives Uber Its First Legal Framework To Operate In Asia 27

An anonymous reader writes: The Philippines has given Uber a rare boost in its hard-fought Asian territories, by granting new legislation that provides rules within which it may legally operate. To this end the country's Department of Transportation and Communications has created a new category of ride called the Transportation Network Vehicle Service (TNVS) classification — whilst at the same time mollifying beleaguered indigenous taxi-services by creating an equivalent classification for an app-hailed taxi able to accept credit cards. As with all its other negotiations in Asia, the fruits of Uber's consultation with the Philippine government was prefaced by unorganized invasion, trade complaints, bans and general conflict.
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Philippines Gives Uber Its First Legal Framework To Operate In Asia

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  • Provides rules? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nidi62 ( 1525137 ) on Monday May 11, 2015 @03:53PM (#49667349)
    Uber is given rules within which they can operate in pretty much every state they have gone into. They have just simply decided to ignore those rules in most cases. Any time Uber is barred from operating in a city/state is completely of their own doing.
    • Uber is given rules within which they can operate in pretty much every state they have gone into.

      False. Uber can't reasonably operate within those rules in every case. Whether they should be allowed to operate is, I think, a separate argument. I argue yes, strictly because taxi licensing doesn't do any of the things it's supposed to do. I see the theoretical public value in it, but it never seems to live up to what's on the tin.

      • by Nidi62 ( 1525137 )

        Uber is given rules within which they can operate in pretty much every state they have gone into.

        False. Uber can't reasonably operate within those rules in every case.

        And my new business of providing people with very cheap cars that have been "lost" by their previous owners can't reasonably operate within rules. Does that mean I can just keep going stealing and reselling car while I lobby to make car theft legal? You have no right to have a business plan that is inherently sound and profitable, and if your business requires you to skirt and ignore local laws and regulations in virtually every jurisdiction you are trying to operate in globally then there is probably a f

        • You have no right to have a business plan that is inherently sound and profitable,

          And you have no right to interfere with a business plan. Because rights are things which don't exist.

          and if your business requires you to skirt and ignore local laws and regulations in virtually every jurisdiction you are trying to operate in globally then there is probably a fundamental flaw in that plan.

          Only if it fails. If they successfully create a change in transportation, and then subsequently profit from it, then it's a good plan. In the process, the average person stands to gain substantially by gaining the right to utilize their own car in any manner they see fit. Taxi licensing programs do not do what they claim to do, and represent a simple cash grab by various interested parties. No one should be

  • by G-Man ( 79561 ) on Monday May 11, 2015 @04:02PM (#49667403)

    Seems like a natural fit for the Philippines, given the blessed anarchy of the Jeepney:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J... [wikipedia.org]

    Disclaimer: I spent a couple of years in the Philippines as a child, but haven't been back in decades. So Jeepneys may not be as widespread/chaotic as I remember.

    • by jblues ( 1703158 )

      Seems like a natural fit for the Philippines, given the blessed anarchy of the Jeepney:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J... [wikipedia.org]

      Disclaimer: I spent a couple of years in the Philippines as a child, but haven't been back in decades. So Jeepneys may not be as widespread/chaotic as I remember.

      Oh there's still literally millions of them, most with very poorly tuned engines belching out smoke and driving chaotically with no indicators. While I love the idea of an elastic, demand based, self adjusting dispatch system for mass transit, I'm not sure how Über would help in the Jeepney probelm. There's usually such a demand for jeeps, that it takes less than a minute or two to catch a ride. They drive well-defined routes with a regulated fee, and transfer from residential areas onto these thoroug

  • As with all its other negotiations in Asia, the fruits of Uber's consultation with the Philippine government was prefaced by unorganized invasion, trade complaints, bans and general conflict.

    I guess nobody ever said it was unbiased news for nerds...

    I do rather like the image of hired transport modernization as a seething horde of goblins, unorganizedly invading Asia with scavenged weapons and half-assed catapults.

  • The Phillippines don't have an incumbent, protectionist taxi industry and easily-bribable politicians? Shame on them - that's not very democratic/free/American, is it?

  • by tompaulco ( 629533 ) on Monday May 11, 2015 @06:12PM (#49668283) Homepage Journal
    What a waste of time. The framework already existed for Uber to operate, Uber just chose to illegally ignore it.
    So now, I suppose that the legitimate taxi operators who had to front money for licensing and insurance can expect some sort of reimbursement for all of those fees. Alternatively, I guess the legitimate taxi operators can develop an app for hailing a cab and then suddenly they don't have to have permits, licensing or insurance.
  • Uber wants to buy Nokia's HERE maps. Personally I don't trust them. HERE maps are excellent and I'm afraid that Uber will stuff them up somehow like MS did with Skype.

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