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Australia Piracy The Internet

Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme 78

angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)
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Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

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  • Still waiting (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mattventura ( 1408229 ) on Friday February 20, 2015 @08:02PM (#49098021) Homepage
    Still waiting for the reverse three strikes, where an IP holder gets punished if they send 3 false notices.
    • Re:Still waiting (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 20, 2015 @08:38PM (#49098179)

      If there is no punishment for false notices, send false notices about people who work with IP or ISPs. As well as politicians and their rich supporters. Problem solved.

      • Report the IP addresses of the sites of the major content providers that supported the legislation and the major government websites.

        • All the 'three strikes' triggers is action that empowers the IP owners. You think the content providers are then going to send lawyers out to attack themselves?

    • No in this proposal it is even better! You have to PAY $25 in order to challenge a strike. So it is free to accuse but you have to pay for the right to challenge?!?!?! With a you get your money back if it was a wrong accusation. Bullshit

      • Re: Still waiting (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        No, they have to pay to accuse you as well. As usual, the lawyers are the winners here

  • Australian Web Sites Feel Their Customers Should Be Using Tor For Everything.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them

    Last time I checked it WAS the govt's job to do law enforcement, not the ISPs.

    • by ZipK ( 1051658 )

      Last time I checked it WAS the govt's job to do law enforcement, not the ISPs.

      This is part of the militarization of ISPs. You should be receiving an induction notice from your local ISP any day now.

      • Report for duty, and you'd best hope it's not to do KP duty at a really remote ISP somewhere. Those USR Couriers are really dusty these days.

    • Re:What? (Score:5, Informative)

      by gronofer ( 838299 ) on Friday February 20, 2015 @09:17PM (#49098331)

      Last time I checked it WAS the govt's job to do law enforcement, not the ISPs.

      Traditionally it was a civil matter, publisher vs publisher. The government only provided the courts.

    • This is standard practice though - apply pressure to an industry to publicly self regulate so that the government doesn't have to expend resources and political capital doing it.

      We saw a similar thing with motorcycles when the zx-12 and hayabusa were released. Having top speeds over 300 and easily affordable caused bad press with people clamouring for the government to do something. In response the motorcycle manufacturers agreed to a 299km/h speed limit so they could show they were doing something and th

      • Having top speeds over 300 and easily affordable

        Heck. Give them a nice stretch of road in the desert and tell them to have fun.

        Maybe even relax the helmet laws if they sign up as organ donors.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The tiny fraction of individuals who are ruining the Internet for the rest of us should get thrown off the web!!

    That policy seems both good and fair.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The tiny fraction of individuals who are ruining the Internet for the rest of us should get thrown off the web!!

      That policy seems both good and fair.

      You mean trolls like you?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    VPN's are about to be big business down under.

    • by Falos ( 2905315 )
      It's funny. My first thought was "Yep, gonna see more VPN sales." and then I realized, we already are. Consider the frequency of mentions, then of mentions of specific offers, then even the frequency of straight-up ads promising to solve spying.

      It's no wonder there's so much effort in owning TOR nodes and branding it a pedorist tool. The number of people who use TOR has increased, yes, but more dramatic is the ballooning number of people aware (and interested). Say what you will about his patriotism (or
  • by bpkiwi ( 1190575 ) on Friday February 20, 2015 @08:40PM (#49098189)
    Sooner or later people will work out that we are ALL copyright holders. For every photo you take, joke you write, or funny cat gif you edit, you hold the copyright. Go ahead, make some and send them to your representative's office, to their kids, or to their parents. All you have to do is wait for them to forward them on to someone else, and then use the laws and tools they are introducing against them. The law will become reasonable again pretty quickly I think.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jonwil ( 467024 )

      They will find a way to twist the law so that it only applies to the big corps and not the little guy.

      • How right you are.

        That's why I believe copyright is completely outdated. It only favors the rich companies. However there do need to be some regulatio of what one can do with regards to creative works.

        In short: the creator must be given some leverage against companies seeking to profit on the fruits of his/her labor. Today, copyright does the exact opposite.

      • by mjwx ( 966435 )

        They will find a way to twist the law so that it only applies to the big corps and not the little guy.

        I think you mean to say they already have.

        High priced lawyers are a huge barrier to entry for anyone who wants to sue.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Good luck waging that battle in court. They have more money than you do. You lose.

  • Does the VPN industry push for this shit?
    • by Threni ( 635302 )

      What "VPN industry"? To the extent it exists at all it's just tiny. And they're going to get legislated out of existence around the world in the next few years. No government - driven by the twin demands of the US government (ok, and their own security services) - and a reactionary, right wing media (following the rules of its wealthy, right wing proprieters, who've invested in and therefore benefit from large corporations who are all in bed with most western governments because they don't need to pay ta

  • oh, i get it. they really didn't mean it.
  • by future assassin ( 639396 ) on Friday February 20, 2015 @09:22PM (#49098367) Homepage

    what are they going to do?

  • Seems like someone is paying lip service to the government.

    Three strikes and we let the rights holder go to court to get IP addresses? Given the rights holders have effectively had zero effect in getting the customer details from ISPs in the past, what are they going to do once they get them? If they can't get through the first stage of the legal battle and get thrown out at the discovery process, what chance have they got of actually successfully suing someone?

    • Three strikes and we let the rights holder go to court to get IP addresses? Given the rights holders have effectively had zero effect in getting the customer details from ISPs in the past, what are they going to do once they get them? If they can't get through the first stage of the legal battle and get thrown out at the discovery process, what chance have they got of actually successfully suing someone?

      I hope some kind of court order would be needed before ISPs will hand over the customer details. However

  • I am surprised lobbies had not already obtained such a measure in Australia.

    It looks outdated now that similar laws are dying in other countries. In France the law was voted but it seems the government is not willing to enforce it. Perhaps it is related to the ruling that considered Internet access is human right.

    • by mjwx ( 966435 )

      I am surprised lobbies had not already obtained such a measure in Australia.

      It looks outdated now that similar laws are dying in other countries. In France the law was voted but it seems the government is not willing to enforce it. Perhaps it is related to the ruling that considered Internet access is human right.

      And you'll pretty much be looking at the same thing in Australia.

      ISP's will pay lip service is a "voluntary" industry code, the same way the news media abides by its "voluntary" industry code (that means only the ABC and SBS are held to any kind of standard, Newscorp and Fairfax can do what they like). If an ISP does enforce the will of the rights holders they'll start to bleed customers and there's one large ISP that is pretty much assured not to do anything that stupid who would love to move up from th

  • Australia is a second class citizen for content. Movies, Netflix, books, you name it. Publishers withhold content or charge much more for it because they can, just bloody minded tradition. That drives most of the "piracy".

    The idea that our government is pushing to help people restrict content that is not available here anyway is appalling. If it is not available under free and equitable terms , it does not deserve copyright. But then the industry whispers in the ears of ministers and we do not have a v

  • So i guess that means here in Canada we have a zero strike scheme. You get caught once and they can take you to court right away.
  • Can we get a three strikes policy for companies that charge exorbitant prices for digital media only in Australia?

  • by Snufu ( 1049644 ) on Saturday February 21, 2015 @01:27AM (#49099133)

    THAT'S a proxy server

  • I'm leaving the country just in time, and I shan't be back.

    Thanks for the education!

  • Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to US government threats to step in and do it for them,
  • by Sasayaki ( 1096761 ) on Saturday February 21, 2015 @11:12AM (#49100429)

    I'm an Australian author. I recently published my 10th novel. I make my living from selling books, primarily on Google Play, but also Amazon and Apple.

    How do I opt out of this scheme? How do I request that even if someone downloads a copy of a book I normally request payment for without doing so, that they face no legal harm from anyone? The article mentions "rights holders" can get in contact with potential "infringers"; how would they notify me? I work from home, is my street address on file somewhere?

    I found that when I ask these kinds of questions it leads to conclusions that should embarrass the people trying to implement them. The truth is; invariably, these kinds of schemes do absolutely nothing "for me" as downloads of my books would not even be detected by whatever system they want to put in place, even if I was stomping and shouting and demanding all the evil pirates ceased immediately.

    This is, and always is, solely an effort to protect a foreign industry, Hollywood. An industry which gives the common Australian absolutely no consideration at all. Digital downloads are often more expensive here than the US, simply because "that's what the market will pay", which is code for, "Australia's high standard of living means we can gouge the shit out of them". Shows arrive late, miss our holidays, are screened out of order or are incomplete.

    Why is this good for Australia and Australians in any way? If nothing else, and setting aside my own personal objections: why are we actively protecting a foreign industry and doing absolutely nothing to protect our domestic productions?

  • but why can't we clamp down on blood-sucking banksters? I suppose that stealing a film and shirking a $10 theater ticket is more serious than stealing billions in pension funds.

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