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Another Bitcoin Exchange Fraud 53

Ellie K writes Bitcoin exchange MyCoin has vanished — leaving $387 million in investor funds unaccounted for. MyCoin is a Hong Kong-based virtual currency trading exchange. Bitcoin exchanges are no stranger to controversy. Mt. Gox closed in February 2014, filing for bankruptcy and leaving investors approximately $500 million out of pocket. Others were 'cyberattacked' including Flexcoin, Poloniex and Bitcurex.
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Another Bitcoin Exchange Fraud

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  • They're all frauds (Score:2, Insightful)

    by AuMatar ( 183847 )

    Does anyone still think that sending money over an unregulated channel for a dubious commodity is a good idea? There's a good reason banks are one of the most regulated industries on the planet.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      I would actually challenge the use of the term "dubious commodity". How, pray tell, can the result of some math-hashing scheme be even remotely considered any kind of "commodity" (i.e. something that has some intrisic value)? Totally bizarre that anyone in their halfway-right mind would put something (real American dollars) that does have intrisic value - being "valid tender for all debts public and private" - into something that does not? A fool and his money, brothers and sisters!
      • by Anonymous Coward

        The USD only has value because people BELIEVE it has value. If everyone decided that the USD isn't trustworthy, it'd lose it's value almost instantly.

        Same for Bitcoin. As long as people believe it has a value, it will.

        • by Optali ( 809880 )

          Well, we believe what we see, and what we see is a whole bunch of industries churning out stuff.
          I assume that that is a valid reason for believing in the US currency, don't you agree?

        • The USD only has value because people BELIEVE it has value. If everyone decided that the USD isn't trustworthy, it'd lose it's value almost instantly.

          Bitcoin doesn't have the largest military/intelligence complex in the world willing to bomb the holy fuck out of anyone who challenges its value.

        • No. The USD only has value because you have to pay your taxes with it and/or the government makes an explicit promise ("legal tender") that it will accept taxes paid with it. "Fiat" doesn't equal "virtual".
    • It was promised as an anonymous, unbreakable, encryption-based currency. And for a while, it was exactly that.

      I'm old enough to remember Flooz [wikipedia.org] commercials. Turn money into e-Money, and it's transferable and spendable in bits.

      Let's take PayPal as an example. Lots of people accept and spend PayPal money, without ever cashing out as dollars. I know you can argue otherwise, but at its most basic, it is the same thing.

      Unless you consider that this particular exchange was particularly suspicious, given signal

      • I don't, however, recall PayPal printing their own money as do the various bit coins. Other than a new concept having difficulty being implemented at first, there's not much of a comparison. PayPal was a go-between, the bit coins are attempting to mint money.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by gl4ss ( 559668 )

          wtf man?

          paypal is exactly printing their own paypal money by assigning money into paypal accounts. that's how they got people started and hoped that everyone wouldn't cash out at once.

          paypal: can create as much as paypal as it wants - probably doesn't want to create more than it can pay out though.

          paypal isn't only a go between, since you can let your funds sit in a paypal account. it's a bank but bullshited itself out of being a bank so they can grab whatever accounts they want when they feel like it.

          bitco

          • Never let your dollars sit in account associated with a pay pall account.

            Move it out of the bastards reach the second it hits your account.

      • by msobkow ( 48369 )

        It was never anonymous.

    • Does anyone still think that sending money over an unregulated channel for a dubious commodity is a good idea?

      Agreed. Bad idea.

      There's a good reason banks are one of the most regulated industries on the planet.

      Yeah, "regulated" in favor of the state; not the consumer. Just so that we're perfectly clear on this! That said, yes, I still favor a bank of sovereign currency over some BS virtual money.

    • by gl4ss ( 559668 ) on Wednesday February 11, 2015 @01:04AM (#49026971) Homepage Journal

      well the thing is that you don't need to keep your bitcoin _in_ the exchange... you only need to transfer it for the transfer.

      if you're banking your bitcoin with the exchange then you're a dolt, even if they pay interest rate on it. if they pay a high interest rate then they're a scam.

      and the process of sending money to the exchanges _is_ regulated like any financial transactions, so you're quite a bit off on that. it's you transferring bitcoin to another bitcoin owner that's the unregulated channel and then you're sending bitcoin..

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Bitcoin - teaching libertarians that banking regulations are a good thing!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 10, 2015 @07:47PM (#49025921)
    Yet more proof (as if you needed it) that storing your financial assets with unregulated "financial institutions" is a bad idea. Until Bitcoin exchanges are insured and regulated they will continue to be hacked and people will continue to lose bitcoins, this just damages bitcoin's reputation. It's a fantastic idea that is getting a bad wrap because of the wild west situation of exchanges.
    • Once that bitcoin exchanges are regulated they will lose the ability to move cash around without oversight, which seems to be its primary appeal

  • I could have sworn there was a story about this a couple days ago. Get your shit together Dice.
  • by Qzukk ( 229616 ) on Tuesday February 10, 2015 @07:56PM (#49025963) Journal

    I think you mean "MyCoin was a Hong Kong-based virtual currency trading exchange."

    Also I do without slashdot for a whole day and what do I get? I get a dupe [slashdot.org].

    Welcome back, slashdot.

    • I rather enjoyed kongbucks and simoleans (actually the fictional stories that they were featured in), the real life embodiment in bitcoins... not so much

      • by f3rret ( 1776822 )

        I rather enjoyed kongbucks and simoleans (actually the fictional stories that they were featured in), the real life embodiment in bitcoins... not so much

        Kongbucks were actual money, the official currency of Mr. Lee's Greater Hong Kong.

  • by JcMorin ( 930466 ) on Tuesday February 10, 2015 @08:19PM (#49026087)
    This "exchange" promise great return, wasn't listed in the huge directory of exchanges http://exchangewar.info/ [exchangewar.info]. This "exchange" didn't have any API for automation and arbitration. Lets just call this exchange a ponzi scheme. There is those get rich quick scheme everywhere... also in the bitcoin universe.
    • What concerns me is that I'm seeing the dotcom businesses starting over, and the next round of neo-libertarians are getting soaked for all their parent's money. How many of the "bitcoin millionaires" who did the actual bitcoin mining actually paid for the power and machinery, rather than "borrowing" the resources? I can't personally think of a single one of the several "bitcoin millionaires" I've met who actually paid for the cost of their fortune themselves.

    • by gweihir ( 88907 )

      And there are always idiots that cannot understand that things to good to be true usually are. Hence Ponzi schemes happen all the time. Noting really to do with BitCoin.

  • by Greyfox ( 87712 ) on Tuesday February 10, 2015 @09:21PM (#49026317) Homepage Journal
    The investors just keep falling for it! It's like shooting fish in a barrel. Also, apparently real world investors are no smarter than Eve online investors when it comes to bitcoin or isk. So here's a little hint, fellas, if someone's offering to hold your bitcoins (or isk) for you, it's a scam.
    • by AK Marc ( 707885 )
      So https://mybitcoinsaver.com/ [mybitcoinsaver.com] is a scam?
      • Well, at first sight it looks like it's not as big a scam as the others, but they're not doing charity work either. They simply take a small amount of money from every transaction, just for the convenience of automatically buying bitcoins every month. You're better off simply buying the bitcoins yourself, but then you'll have to actually do that every month.

        The bitcoins go to a wallet under your control, they only have the public address, so they don't hold your bitcoin and can't suddenly take it away. The

    • by delt0r ( 999393 )
      Hay that is not fair. At least in Eve i will get to Double my isk. Double it! All i have to do is follow the instructions in his bio....
  • 100% of purposely fraudulent exchanges were run in Asian countries. Completely unrelated, in most of Asia it's culturally acceptable to rip someone off or scam them if you can. See a pattern here?
  • Dupe. [slashdot.org]

    timothy strikes again.
  • Just wanted to note that no one in the industry had even heard about this exchange before. It's not a real Bitcoin exchange. It was some sort of pure ponzi scheme that didn't actually even provide any sort of Bitcoin exchange, simply claimed that they do. So no, this was NOT another Mt. Gox. Mt. Gox was an actual Bitcoin exchange and also the largest exchange in from 2010 to 2012. MyCoin wasn't even an actual exchange. Get your facts straight, please!
  • by Canth7 ( 520476 ) on Wednesday February 11, 2015 @09:27AM (#49028561)
    It's just a regular Ponzi scheme with Bitcoin marketing. All of the investments came from wealthy investors who put up an average of 1M HKD looking for 2-3X return in only a few short months. Sure, the operators of the Ponzi scheme / "exchange" told them that they were going to get bitcoin in return but very few BTC actually flowed to investors. This is not really a Bitcoin story and the calls by HK regulators for banning Bitcoin is both unwarranted and won't stop the problem - there will always be suckers looking for a get rich quick scheme to draw them in, no matter what the medium of exchange may be.
  • Instead of the ridiculous $387m in losses, it looks like closer to $8.1m in losses. http://www.coindesk.com/mycoin... [coindesk.com] As always, reporters are more than happy to run any title that gets hits, regardless of how likely the situation meshes with the facts.

[Crash programs] fail because they are based on the theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby a month. -- Wernher von Braun

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