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TurboTax Halts E-filing of State Tax Returns Because of Potential Fraud 119

mpicpp writes with this news from Marketwatch: Intuit, the parent company of TurboTax, has stopped e-filing all state tax returns due to increased suspicion of fraud. The company says it is investigating criminal attempts to use stolen data to file fraudulent returns and claim refunds, after hearing concerns from a handful of states, Intuit spokeswoman Diane Carlini told MarketWatch. After a preliminary examination with security experts, Intuit believes its systems weren't breached, but crooks may have used TurboTax software to file fraudulent returns after stealing identities, she said. Intuit said in a release that "the information used to file fraudulent returns was obtained from other sources outside the tax preparation process." The company called pausing e-filings to states a "precautionary step." Utah, the first state to reach out to Intuit, issued a notice Thursday saying the state tax commission has discovered 28 fraud attempts that "originate from data compromised through a third-party commercial tax preparation software process," as well as 8,000 returns flagged as potentially fraudulent.
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TurboTax Halts E-filing of State Tax Returns Because of Potential Fraud

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  • I liked them a good 10 years ago, simple, easy. then again i was making minimum wage. This year im thinking about trying taxslayer. I like the reviews ive heard from friends who made the switch years ago. anyone else have any good simple do it yourself methods to share?
    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I liked them a good 10 years ago, simple, easy. then again i was making minimum wage. This year im thinking about trying taxslayer. I like the reviews ive heard from friends who made the switch years ago. anyone else have any good simple do it yourself methods to share?

      Besides filling out the forms and mailing them?

    • Cheaper than TT, very easy to use, and it works well. Ya I could do it myself but in addition to being a fair bit of paperwork and math (I think about 15-20 pages between federal and state in my case) I don't want to have to look up any rule changes or breaks that might apply to me and the tax software has all that programmed in. I'm way too lazy to do them by hand, and they aren't complex enough to be worth paying an accountant to do for me.

      Only downside is they want more money to e-file a state return. No

  • If you are going to file under someone else's identity, you have to file first!

  • So why don't they stop filing federal as well?

    There needs to be better protection in place to prevent this such as cross verifying the bank account to the actual person doing the filing. It's pretty shitty when 28 false claims can shut down the entire system and ruin it for everyone. Thank you for ruining it for everyone.
    • Re:Half way there (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ganjadude ( 952775 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:20PM (#49002863) Homepage
      easy solution, stop filing taxes. The government gets all that information anyway. why not just have the gov send you a bill/refund every year, and IF you are not happy with the bill/refund, then you can file your taxes yourself. the way we do things is so backwards
      • That's like asking the lottery to track down who actually won instead of just keeping the winnings. Unlikely.
        • Re:Half way there (Score:5, Informative)

          by mrchaotica ( 681592 ) * on Friday February 06, 2015 @09:02PM (#49003057)

          Most other first-world countries manage it.

        • Re:Half way there (Score:5, Insightful)

          by machineghost ( 622031 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @09:37PM (#49003201)

          Strangely it's not actually that issue, as plenty of other countries do their taxes that way.

          The problem here (like just about all of our problems) comes from the intersection of business and government. The IRS actually looked in to free tax filing, but Intuit and their fellow companies lobbied hard to get it killed. It turns out Intuit would make a lot less money if the government did our taxes for us, so it's in their best interest to spend lots of money to prevent it from happening.

          • No doubt, this is a substantial reason why the government does not do the bill.

            Another big reason is that in many (most?) other countries the number of exceptions (deductions, exemptions, etc.) is much smaller, so it is much easier for the government to figure your taxes based on your income reported from the employer. I live in NZ, and I would say the average guy does not file a return. If every scrap of income he made was from a job, or bank interest, or pension payments, or dividends lodged with a bro
          • Given this reality, doesn't that ethically justify using only pirated copies of TurboTax to do one's taxes?

            • Yes... but you should be doing your taxes with a spreadsheet and a PDF [irs.gov] reader anyway, just because it works better.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        The government gets all that information anyway. why not just have the gov send you a bill/refund every year, and IF you are not happy with the bill/refund, then you can file your taxes yourself.

        Corporate welfare.

        The IRS is fully capable of doing this, and they even researched implementing just such a system. Lobbyists put a quick stop to that idea every time it comes up. Tax preparation services like H&R Block and online filing services like TurboTax have spent millions and millions of dollars [propublica.org] fighting proposed legislation that would let Americans choose to have the IRS handle their taxes instead of paying a third party. Intuit (parent of TurboTax) has a larger lobbying budget than Apple!

        • So, Apple's lifetime lobbying budget has been $2,264,655 dollars, and last year the amount spent was $91,900.

          Intuit spent $820,422 last year on lobbying. As such, the implication that they're doing more than Apple is outright trolling. If you want a better examples to use instead:
          Elliot Management (2014): $7,152,149
          National Assn of Realtors (2014): $6,324,267
          Renaissance Technologies (2014): $3,671,200
          Goldman Sachs (2014): $3,026,286
          Microsoft (2014): $2,131,252
          Exxon Mobil (2014): $1,931,230
          Google
          • by Anonymous Coward

            Sorry, I'm a bit sick this weekend and may be misreading you, but are you saying that spending almost ten times as much as Apple on lobbying isn't doing more than Apple?

      • easy solution, stop filing taxes. The government gets all that information anyway. why not just have the gov send you a bill/refund every year, and IF you are not happy with the bill/refund, then you can file your taxes yourself. the way we do things is so backwards

        That would work so much better if most of our social safety net was;t the tax code. Day care, college education, a significant proportion of health costs (obviously Obamacare, but also the Employer Health Care Exclusion), etc. are all run through the tax code.

        Which makes our taxes much more complicated then a place like Denmark, where they just pay for that shit directly and mostly fund the government through a VAT (i.e.: a sales tax).

        • well, it could be done right now as is, giving people the option to review. in other words, instead of sending us tax forms to fill out and send to the government to compare with what they have on file, have the govt send us the tax forms they have, and we can reply with a yes - or a no, along with the forms explaining why they got it wrong

          or we could do the right thing, eliminate income taxes are we currently know them, and institute a fair or flat tax, thus making the idea of a tax return for an indivi
          • It would be more complicated then you think to do this. Americans with very boring tax lives do not get the simple form, so the forms would have to be reworked.

            Good luck with Fair Tax or Flat Tax. Obama just proposed ending a tax break I have never seen anywhere outside of an IRS textbook (the 529 deduction, I do taxes three months a year and I've never seen anyone use it, I know how to report it in theory but I could;t tell which button tho click on the software to put it on a return) and got crucified by

        • by GNious ( 953874 )

          As a guy from Denmark, let me make one small observation:
          If your taxes are "much more complicated" than what we have back home, you're thoroughly screwed.

          • I don't know about the Danish system as a whole, but the income tax system for individuals is much simpler then the US. For example, there are three different tax forms Americans file (1040EZ with about 15 lines, 1040A with fifths, and the full 1040 with 79 lines). Your income tax is calculated in stages.

            First you add up all potential sources of income -- wage income, independent contractor income (which usually has to go on a Schedule C so your software calculates the Self-Employment tax correctly), intere

          • BTW: You know that controversy over Obamacare? The way it works is that the federal government set up an insurance market, and even the poorest can afford to buy insurance because of Federal subsidies. You know how they do the subsidy? You tell the marketplace how much you think you'll make. It runs an algorithm for how much you can afford to pay, and then calculates the subsidy necessary for insurance to be affordable.

            That subsidy is an income tax credit. Which you have to repay if you got a raise and didn

      • by dirk ( 87083 )

        While this is a great idea that works in the rest of the world, there is no way it can work here. Our tax system is too screwed up for it to work in the US. Most other countries don't have different taxes for different types of income, tax deferred income, tax deductions, tax rebates, and any number of other things to deal with. It would work for people with very simple tax returns but our system is too screwed up for it to work for most people.

        This is the same reason a flat tax would never work in the US.

      • by sabri ( 584428 )

        easy solution, stop filing taxes. The government gets all that information anyway.

        Not true. First of all, you may have accounts outside of the country, which you will need to report. Second, you may have rental income that is not automatically reported. And those are only the first two things I thought of when I read your post.

        Oh, and those are Federal only. An example of state taxes that are not automatically reported is the use tax that you have to pay if your state uses it, like California does.

        The IRS also doesn't necessarily need to know about your deductions, unless you want yo

        • In the UK, you are required to file a return if you have more than £300 of income from offshore investments, or you have rental income. But the vast majority of people manage fine without filing a tax return.

      • Except they get the money from you every month in your pay directly so it is probably not 100% comparable to the US system. You can make a formular to get some back once per year. I easily got a few thousands back for example a few years ago.
    • The Feds do more cross-checking then the states, so it's harder to just tell Utah "I am totally former Governor John Hunstman, I really really made enough money to owe you $500 in taxes but had $15,000 witheld, and please send all the money to a bank account for Michaleen Czirpinski in Pittsburgh." The example is slightly exaggerated (the state would usually know how much Hunstman paid into the system), but not much.

  • Ripple Effect (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Virtucon ( 127420 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:06PM (#49002789)

    You know we have to stop using SSN's for everything. It's time to have a different system. The Anthem hacking is now another example of how vulnerable we are and how we let these companies skate when caught. It's time that PII needs to be held in strictest confidence and with financial penalties awarded to the victims of these stupid attacks. Right now if the FTC slaps them on the wrists and fines them it all goes to the Feds. Fuck that! If I'm a victim of your mishandling of my PII you owe me bitches! Pay Up!

  • by rmdingler ( 1955220 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:17PM (#49002847) Journal
    The social security number is used at every school you went to, every job you've had, every credit account you ever held...that is way more exposure than the cleverest security can ever defend.

    Do we need to implement a password system that doesn't include a pet's name for our SSN's verification?

    • by Bigbutt ( 65939 )

      The worst part is when I was in the military back in the 70's, you were instructed to mark your personal gear. Either etched or written. My gaming books from back then all have my SSN written on the inside cover with my full name should it get lost.

      [John]

    • by stox ( 131684 )

      Back in the "Good Old Days" Social Security cards were clearly marked as "DO NOT USE FOR IDENTIFICATION"

      Sadly, when Emperor Reagan was elected, we forgot all that.

      Prior to that, it was illegal to use your SSN for identification, outside of the military.

      I think it was the military who pioneered the use of an SSN as an ID.

      • Followed next by many universities and colleges. At least most employers, while they have your SSN for legitimate reasons (W2/1099 filing) at least have the courtesy in most cases to assign you an Employee number to use within the company.
    • by antdude ( 79039 )

      Even utilitites and other services require it. :( Also for those Q&As, don't enter real data.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:19PM (#49002853)
    There are 2,095 negative 1-star reviews on Amazon of Intuit's TurboTax Deluxe [amazon.com] tax preparation software. Why? Because, without telling customers, Intuit removed important functions from TurboTax Deluxe.

    Most helpful review: "The Deluxe version does not allow you to file Schedule D or E. ..."

    Most helpful critical review: "I hate being gouged, and I hate weasel word explanations even more... I am angry about the deliberate disabling of critical features in TurboTax Deluxe. No Schedules C, D, or E."

    The solution? In my opinion, the CEO of Intuit should be fired. Intuit should find a new CEO who will cure Intuit of its long-term abusiveness.
    • by zidium ( 2550286 )

      They are making things right tomorrow by upgrading every Dexluxe owner for free and putting back the features in next year's version. The CEO also gave a very sincere apology.

      https://www.linkedin.com/pulse... [linkedin.com]

      • Intuit is NOT making things completely right! Intuit is apparently just reducing the amount of abuse. See this explanation by an Intuit VP [amazon.com] on Amazon:

        "... returning customers who have already upgraded to Premier or Home & Business, we are continuing to offer $25 cash back through April 20."

        Apparently only customers who know about the rebate will get money back; that may be a very small percentage. Many customers paid $30 extra, so Intuit will still make $5 extra for tricking customers. Some customers have automatic extensions of time to file, so they won't get the "$25 cash back", because they will file after April 20.

        See this Amazon review: **UPDATE -- IT'S EVEN WORSE** [amazon.com]. Quote: " Even in the high-priced Premier version, Schedule C is crippled -- limited to $100 of deductions in a couple of expense categories. I.e. only good for a tiny hobby business, and maybe not even that. So now having forced me to Premier, even that high priced product is useless to me."

        See this story: Citing Tax Fraud Spike, TurboTax Suspends State E-Filings [krebsonsecurity.com]. Quote: "Cyber thieves have long sought stolen credentials for hijacked tax preparation accounts at TurboTax, H&R Block and related services."

        Another quote:

        "Stolen TurboTax or H&R Block credentials are cheaper and more plentiful that most people probably would imagine. According to the below-pictured well-known seller on the Dark Web forum Evolution Market, hacked accounts currently can be had for .0002 bitcoins, which works out to about 4 cents apiece."

        Another:

        "Unfortunately for Intuit and its users, calls for the company to support two-factor authentication have fallen on deaf ears so far, at least according to twofactorauth.org, a site that tracks which popular cloud-based services support the added security measure."

        Intuit has a LONG history of abuse, of being anti-customer to make more money. Dishonest people don't later become honest, generally. This is an example of that. Dishonest people, when forced to correct their dishonesty, look for other ways to be dishonest.

        If Intuit has a capable, strong board of directors, which I doubt, the board should consider getting a new CEO, and firing all the other dishonest people in Intuit top management.

        This comment gives only a very short summary of what I consider to be Intuit's anti-customer behavior.
      • They are making things right tomorrow by upgrading every Dexluxe owner for free and putting back the features in next year's version. The CEO also gave a very sincere apology.

        https://www.linkedin.com/pulse... [linkedin.com]

        They'll just try it again later.

      • by tipo159 ( 1151047 ) on Saturday February 07, 2015 @02:13AM (#49004081)

        They are making things right tomorrow by upgrading every Dexluxe owner for free and putting back the features in next year's version. The CEO also gave a very sincere apology.

        They are nowhere close to making it right.

        I have been using TurboTax Deluxe for 15+ years without even thinking about it. I have a minimal amount of iOS app income (net about $100/year right now) so I need to file a minimal Schedule C. I bought TurboTax for 2014 a couple of weeks ago and installed it, but was waiting for W-2s, so hadn't entered any numbers yet.

        A week and a half ago, Intuit and its CEO sent me e-mail with a "very sincere apology" that explained that I was eligible for $25 towards upgrading. As explained in the e-mail, they were improving the customer experience by removing functionality and it was really being done for customer benefit or something like that. I had no idea what the letter was referring to, so did a search and found that they had disabled Schedules C, D & E in TurboTax Deluxe and there had been a huge outcry.

        I thought that they had disabled the wizards that walk you through the forms, but found out that I was wrong when I started entering numbers into TurboTax. I tried to select Schedule C and was told that I needed to upgrade TurboTax and that it would cost $40. Note that Intuit was only offering to reimburse $25 towards an upgrade. At that point, I removed TurboTax from my computer and returned it to Costco and bought competing tax software.

        One interesting thing to note is that the product info on the Intuit web page still indicated that TurboTax Deluxe could be used to file Schedule C even though it actually could not.

        Yesterday, Intuit and its CEO sent me another e-mail with a "very sincere apology" which explained the they would be reverting TurboTax Deluxe back to the way that has been for years (but, if you had already paid for an upgrade and already filed your taxes, they were still only reimbursing $25, even though the actual upgrade cost could be more). Since I now already have other tax software, I will not be taking them up on the offer.

        As I said, I would just buy TurboTax every year without thinking about it and I know a lot of people who did the same. The idea to try and squeeze even more money out of people, resulting in people thinking about whether to buy their product and considering a competitor, has got to be among the worst 'penny-wise, pound-foolish' business decisions ever made.

        • by zidium ( 2550286 )

          So your only complaint now is that you didn't get $40 instead of $25?

          I checked on Amazon and Deluxe is $60 and Premier is $75. So it looks like you'd be getting money.

        • Don't know how much your paying now, or why the upgrade was $40, but I just picked up TT "Home & Business" a week or two ago for $60 at Amazon. Was the cheapest I've been able to buy it in the last 10 years.

          Due to running my own software business, I have to use the Home & Bussiness version every year, and the price has only gone down over the years. When I first started buying it several years ago, it was usually around $100. Then a couple years later $90... then the last couple years I've bee
          • by zidium ( 2550286 )

            Me, too. TT Home & Business:

            2011: $120
            2012: $115
            2013: $90
            2014: $85
            2015: $65

            TT For Corporations :
            2012: $150
            2013: $140
            2014: $135
            2015: $120

    • by MillionthMonkey ( 240664 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:41PM (#49002971)
      Intuit is notorious for lobbying politicians [propublica.org] to make tax filing complicated for anyone not using TurboTax.
      • It was complicated long before Intuit came into being.

      • Quote from that article, How the Maker of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing: [propublica.org]

        "Imagine filing your income taxes in five minutes -- and for free. You'd open up a pre-filled return, see what the government thinks you owe, make any needed changes and be done. The miserable annual IRS shuffle, gone."

        Intuit has been paying government officials to try to prevent improvements that would benefit everyone, the article says.
        • by swb ( 14022 )

          It really baffles me why the IRS doesn't have a web form for filing taxes. They have all the filed data on what you made. The only explanation that makes any sense is lobbying pressure from the tax filing industry.

          • And then there's the other explanation that makes even more sense:

            The tax code is so complicated that not even the IRS actually understands it. And if THEY made mistakes on their tax software, they'd be held accountable. If a third party makes mistakes, well, not the IRS' fault you owe extra money this year....

            • by swb ( 14022 )

              It's complex, sure, but how complex is it for the vast majority of taxpayers? Most people have pretty standardized and well-understood income sources and deductions.

              Before my wife started working a lot of free-lance work, I used to do our taxes by hand (two incomes, two small stock dividends, mortgage, childcare expenses) and one year they said I overpaid and refunded something in the neighborhood of $25, every other year I was dead on and that was just from following the forms and IRS instructions.

              I see n

          • They might have all the filed data for what YOU made, but many people are not you. Sure, if you work in the same job all year, have no investments and made no other income in any way, and your only tax document you get is a single W2, then yes, it should be easy. Any case other than that scenario starts getting more and more complicated pretty quick.
    • There are 2,095 negative 1-star reviews on Amazon ... Because, without telling customers, Intuit removed important functions from TurboTax Deluxe.

      I find great satisfaction in seeing a company lose customers, brand reputation, and a good deal of money in response to pulling a dick move like this. It gives me the sense that all is right with the world. The H&R Block software is cheaper and is not crippled in the way TurboTax is. My family has abandoned TurboTax, never to return, based on this incident.

  • Victim (Score:5, Interesting)

    by bumlike ( 804663 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:24PM (#49002881)
    I am actually a victim of this. I got my W2s on the 22nd and went to file them on TurboTax, just like I have for about the last 10 years. To my surprise my claim had been approved already by the IRS. I contacted TurboTax thinking I was going to be able to resolve it with a quick phone call for them to reset my account so I could really file my taxes. They werent able to do anything and I had to contact the IRS directly along with a few other branches and my local police department. I now have to paper file along with a Identity Theft form. My refund will now take at least 180 days to process. It could really be worse than it is. I didnt lose anything, the payment to the thieves was stopped before it was paid, just a hassle at this point. And those responsible had my refund at over $1600 short! :-P
    • 1600 short? Geez, if your gonna steal someones identity, at LEAST get everything you are "entitled" to!
    • Re:Victim (Score:4, Funny)

      by sexconker ( 1179573 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @09:20PM (#49003141)

      I wish someone would steal my identity and do my taxes.
      (I owe money every year because I don't like giving the government interest-free loans.)

      • LOL, same here. I owe my complete tax bill each year, no refunds for me. I don't even file quarterly returns, because the penalty for not doing so (~$100) is less than the interest I'll make keeping it in savings all year long + the amount of time and effort to do the quarterly returns.

        While it's not fun paying a big lump sum in full each year, I do take satisfaction in knowing I'm not giving the government an interest free loan all year long. And I'm keeping control of my money and only paying them w
  • by Holistic Missile ( 976980 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @08:43PM (#49002977)
    I've been using H&R Block's TaxCut software for years, and in the last couple of years or so, I noticed a new option to retrieve your W-2 information for you. Since most companies use a payroll service, the software can actually find and retrieve your W-2 information and fill it in for you. I didn't even have to know who my employer's payroll service is, which is stupid for them not to require - it's on every check stub. I don't remember if it did any authentication offhand (it was a year ago!). If, through ID theft, someone has your name, SSN, etc., they could easily fill this information in on a bogus return they are filing. Then, as mentioned in another post, no attempt is made to verify that the bank account the refund is being deposited in actually belongs to the taxpayer. On second thought, I guess the ID thief could just open an account in your name to receive the refund in.
    • Question: How old are you?

      I'm 34 and I don't even know what color paper my paystub is. Direct Deposit to a checking account attached to a debit card means I literally haven't seen a pay stub in four years. And I have two jobs. I vaguely recall Home Depots are blue, but I honestly have no fucking clue what color the ones from H and R Block are.

      Which means that if you're using that as a security measure you've pissed off a massive section of your customer base.

      I agree that if customers valued their security m

      • by ShaunC ( 203807 )

        Which means that if you're using that as a security measure you've pissed off a massive section of your customer base.

        It's still required by law that the W2 be mailed out, so that's where the payroll company's name (or a ten-digit identifier that's also supplied to the IRS, or any of a number of other security features) could go. For what it's worth, I'm 35 and will always request paper paychecks as long as they're an option.

        • It's required by law that there be an option to receive a W2 by mail, not that it actually be sent out. I personally have not been offered a physical copy of a 2 from an employer in years because I made a point of checking the e-everything box. I sincerely hope nobody's tried to physically mail me one, because my address from Feb '11 to Aug of '14 was a Boarding House where some incredibly sketchy people had access to the mail.

          You can add all the security features you want, the core problem is that they wil

      • 48. I guess I used an out-dated term! Of course, I have direct deposit, and we can access our pay stubs through our portal to ADP. They are PDF files that look exactly like they did when we received paper ones each week, years ago. They keep 3 years' worth of them (and W-2's) online for the employees to access directly. Older ones have to be requested via a rep. We get W-2's mailed to us, but that's it. Everything else is available online. We also schedule PTO and vacation days online through the portal.
        • There's dozens and dozens of things that the IRS/companies/tax places/etc. could do to make taxes more secure. W2 info is just the tip of the iceberg. In many cases it's actually irrelevant, because you can make the numbers up and file on Jan 20th, but the IRS will not have most W2s until closer to the W2 deadline of the 31st. You've got a decent chance of getting the money and being gone before anyone's the wiser.

          As a country, most Americans strongly prefer quicker refunds, which means that any security fe

      • If you hold back refunds until the first of May, people won't bother to file until April 14th; there's no incentive to file sooner like there is now. So then you're trying to do more work in that tight window.
        • Number one, you'd still get people doing their taxes early. Believe me, I work in a tax office and we get people before the first filing day (the 20th this year). Some of them even have a good reason (i.e.: a surprising number of anti-poverty charities require a 1040 to prove you're poor). Moreover if you did this places like my office would probably extend their loan eligibility through the 15th, which means a lot of people who need $500 NOW and can't wait until May would file in January or February.

          Number

        • Everyone is talking about delaying refunds until later. Here's the problem, it's your money, you should get it back as soon as you can. How would a bank take it if they loaned you money at 0% interest, and when your payment came due, you handed them a book of convoluted formulas and complex word problems, and told them they needed to fill out half a dozen forms correctly and you'll make sure they're correct and then hold your loan payment from them for several months to make sure that they are the correct
  • by CrimsonAvenger ( 580665 ) on Friday February 06, 2015 @09:00PM (#49003043)
    As of about two hours ago, Turbo-Tax is again processing State Tax Returns....
  • Pass the Fair Tax at the Federal and state levels, and never pay income taxes again. It's drop dead simple and it even taxes the criminals. No favors, no loopholes, no cheating, and no tax returns!

    As far as I can tell, only the government is against it. It removes too much of their power.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by KermodeBear ( 738243 )

      The power to tax is the power to destroy. When all it takes is the whim of a the legislature to pass a tax...

      Of course, this isn't nearly as bad as regulatory organizations that don't even have to pass a bill; executive fiat is all that is required.

      Because of this, we'll never see a flat or fair tax in this country.

  • "Utah, the first state to reach out to Intuit, issued a notice Thursday saying the state tax commission has discovered 28 fraud attempts that "originate from data compromised through a third-party commercial tax preparation software process," as well as 8,000 returns flagged as potentially fraudulent."
  • I always felt frustrated paying over 50 bucks for tax software.
    I went to Taxact 8 years ago because of price (22 bucks or so for deluxe state and federal and federal efile, $19 if you buy early). I had tried turbotax and H&R block. They are all roughly equivalent.
    The only negative is that they don't seem to import my stocks directly from one of my brokerages.
    But it's well worth the avoided hassle of the big names, though.

    I'm not avid over tax software, but I like these guys because I think they charge a

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