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CBDTPA Finds A Champion In the House 430

pshoemaker writes: "Wired is reporting that House member Adam Schiff of Burbank is seeking a co-sponsor for his House version of Hollings' CBDTPA. His 'Dear Colleagues' letter lays-out the same inspired thinking: that without copy protection there can be no broadband entertainment." Another reader suggests: "Be sure to also check out who's been paying him just so you know who it is he's representing..."
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CBDTPA Finds A Champion In the House

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  • This sounds bad... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by pro-mpd ( 412123 )
    Perhaps it is time to start sending dt-mail. If they already have people in both houses, count the days of freedom...
    • hahahaha (Score:4, Insightful)

      by HanzoSan ( 251665 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:47PM (#3244551) Homepage Journal
      I dont see you guys trying to stop this.

      I dont see you all protesting in the streets on a massive scale, because thats what its going to take. Once it passes your protests wont work, it will be War on Sharing.
      • In the interests of maintaining "closer ties to the community" (ie getting reelected), many Senators and Representatives have local offices in their home districts/states.

        How hard really is it for you to look up their number/address, and pay them a phone call/visit? When you call up, ask questions about the bill, is: "I have certain reservations about this bill", or "could you clarify what exactly this clause means, as the way I read it, it could inadvertently affect the sale of software by small businesses."

        The staffer will generally be clueless, relying on public statements by the senator/representative to phrase a reply. If no statement exists, this means you have an opening to shape that future statement, by having them take down some of your concerns to be addressed by your congresscritter.

        For example, I called an office of one of the CBDTPA co-sponsors, asked for clarification on the bill, and failing that, asked them to take down a few concerns I had. I intend to follow up on this later, maybe with another phone call, or a personal visit to the local staffer's office.

        Calling/faxing/mailing, just before a vote is pretty much useless, since they know it's a spur of the moment, inflamed by pseudo-grassroots thing - it doesn't matter for squat. However, if we get involved in the actual debate, and make our presence known then, it will be much easier to get staffers and representatives on our side, informed on the issues that we want addressed. The best way to get involved is to touch base with them, in an interactive manner, before they get swamped and start blowing people off.

  • Entertainment (Score:2, Insightful)

    by cheetham ( 247087 )
    Does downloading porn and watching people's webcams count as entertainment? ;-)

    --
    Jay
    http://freshmeat.net/projects/eddie42
  • by happyclam ( 564118 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:22PM (#3244374)
    Our nation's creative enterprises have been hesitant to offer their products over the Internet out of fear of piracy...

    Oh, so THAT's why every single new movie release has its own full multimedia web site to promote it.

    And here I thought they were hesitant because the uneducated are typically afraid of what they don't understand.

  • by Corvaith ( 538529 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:22PM (#3244376) Homepage
    ...to my representatives on this one. Long, detailed letters, in fact. I encourage everyone else to do the same. Make sure that they're well and fully aware of how their own constituents feel on the issue.
    • Yeah and its also how you saved napster, and stopped the partriot act.

      Petitions do nothing, writing people who dont listen to you will do nothing, you have to show them you disagree, begging gets you no where
      • Petitions do nothing, writing people who dont listen to you will do nothing, you have to show them you disagree, begging gets you no where

        ** sarcasm **
        Thats right, we'll stop at nothing less than violent overthrow of the government. Or maybe we can get a few hundred of our closest friends to run for congress and win. Or maybe we can leave and start our own country. With blackjack and hookers!
        ** /sarcam **

        Or maybe those of us who are not listed in Forbes or People can attack the bill by spreading knowlege and letting our congress people know that our money and our votes will go elsewhere.

        You sir, are an dumbass....
    • My senators and rep fully support the thing.

      They *know* I can't do shit to get them reelected whereas a lot of $ will certainly help.
      • At this point you must exploit the law. Look for possible implications that can be twisted to your advantage and exploit them mercilessly. Someone here suggested that pornographers, as copyright holders, could be considered to benefit from the proposed legislation. As such, you should get the word out that your congressmen are supporting a bill that will greatly benefit the porn industry.
      • No, you can't do anything by yourself, but you can inform others, and, as a group, you can do a lot. Have you written a letter to your local newspaper? Have you told anyone you know about this thing? Power lies in numbers.

      • Then you need to target your congresspeople for un-election. That means spreading the word, through posters, mass mailings, leaflets, whatever, that your elected representatives support or sponsored an anti-consumer, anti-free-speech law. Do it right now before the vote. Be sure to forward a leaflet to their local offices. Scare the living crap out of them. It would also help to publish their names here. We need to destroy their careers. Nothing else will sufficiently teach Congress to never again cross this line.
  • Write in... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by NecroPuppy ( 222648 )
    Send a letter to the editor of your local papers, letting them know how bad this bill is.

    I did, and they actually printed it. Of course, I have the (mis)fortune to be in South Carolina, the state that Hollings represents. And I would gladly help un-elect him, if I wasn't moving to California in two weeks...
    • Re:Write in... (Score:3, Insightful)

      by HiThere ( 15173 )
      Well in California you can help unelect Feinstein. I wrote in a protest and got back a letter saying how important copy protection was. May she d**p d**d of a f**l disease.

      You fill in the blanks, and the worse your guesses the closer you will be to my wishes.

      • She's up in 2006. I'm with you all the way. Too bad we don't have a recall provision for senators.

        Dianne makes me ashamed to be a Californian.

    • by HanzoSan ( 251665 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:38PM (#3244492) Homepage Journal
      When will people get it through their thick skulls that petitions dont work.

      Lets look at DMCA, did petitions stop it? Hell no.

      Lets look at Napster, did petitions save Napster? Hell no.

      Why isnt marijuana legal? People have been petitioning for it by the millions for 20 years or more now.

      Face it, Petitions have never solved a thing.

      Tabacco was made Legal because people didnt obey the laws, civil disobedience by the millions, and there arent enough jails to enforce it, alcohol? Alcohol was illegal once, it took the mafia and illegal activities, corruption and control of the government through the mafia, essentially terrorism tactics to make alcohol legal.

      SSSCA, you arent going to stop this unless you fight, you dont have to be violent to fight, you can fight with your intelligence, programmers should write unstopable programs like freenet, rich people should support lobby groups on our side, people who are good writers should write books, articles, editorials, and give as much media attention as possible to this, public speakers should host rallies along with musicians at local colleges where other intelligent people are. Contact churches, libaries, civil rights groups, and convince them how important it is to protect our rights. Contact patriotic groups, anti government groups, and anarchist groups and explain to them how the government is trying to control them not just offline but online as well.

      Contact the elderly, contact teachers, and highschool students, explain to all of these groups whats going on, hang posters in front of highschools, near libraries, near sam goody and HMV, Blockbuster and other stores which tell people about the SSSCA, use clever images, such as comparing the SSSCA to Nazism, Explain how unfair it is, use images of jail and rich CEOs, show images of locks on their computer.

      If all of the people reading this did this in their towns seperately, meaning true activism on a LARGE scale, Well its simple to break it down into parts.

      INFORM --- Tell the public what the SSSCA is!

      Explain ---- Tell the public whats wrong with the SSSCA

      Results ---- Tell them what will happen if the SSSCA passes, and what kinda society it will lead to if the trend continues

      Solution ---- Tell them how to stop the SSSCA, tell them a msg similar to what I'm telling you, explain to them not to just stop the SSSCA, but to promote absolute freedom of speech online, meaning no one can control what you do with your computer, if the RIAA and MPAA does not want us to pirate stuff, they should make it impossible to pirate or undesirable to do so, if this means lowering the price so its not worth buying a CD or DVD burner, or if this means locking the DVD up, they have options, what they shouldnt do is take away our freedoms, its like saying you cant use your hands to draw a copy of a picture you like.
      • When will people get it through their thick skulls that petitions dont work.

        Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those propositions that appear in state elections every year get there because enough people signed a petition to get them on the ballot? Lots of those propositions get passed, too.

        Petitions are perfectly useful when used properly. Perhaps the ones we hear about on SlashDot aren't being done right. Perhaps electronically signing a petition which says little more than "We don't like X" doesn't cut it. But petitions in general are perfectly useful.
        • Electronic petitions don't work because they can't be verified. There's not a common enough - nor accepted enough - method of non-repudiation to prove the authenticity of the "signatures" on an electronic petition so they aren't useful to move the issue through the system.

          The recent issues with ZDNet's "polls" have cast enough doubt on the validity of such things - including electronic petitions - that politicians can ignore them by simply stating "we can't prove all those people actually signed it... Now if it had been a paper petition, that would be different."

    • by HanzoSan ( 251665 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:49PM (#3244570) Homepage Journal
      lets flood the local news papers with letters. If Hemos is still reading this, why not post up a list of emails of news people, lets get this issue on the Oreilly factor, MSNBC, and as many highly watched shows as possible, also lets write as many news papers as possible, how about a list.

      While i dont think petitions will stop this, if you are going to petititon, do it seriously, a flood of letters to hundreds of diffrent news sites and shows may work.
  • From Burbank? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Karma Sink ( 229208 ) <oakianus@fuckmicrosoft.com> on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:23PM (#3244383) Homepage
    Is this really a surprise, then?

    Most of the time, I'm against representatives doing things like this, but I think he's one of the rare few who can claim he's representing his constituents...
    • Sure, he can claim it more easily than most other representatives, but that doesn't make it true.

      Schiff represents not just Burbank, but also Glendale and Pasadena, huge technology areas. I wouldn't be surprised if he has ten times as many constituents who work in the tech industry, than who work in the entertainment industry.

      Can we fight fire with fire? I think it's time that tech businesses in his district started giving Adam some big donations, too.
      • Can we fight fire with fire? I think it's time that tech businesses in his district started giving Adam some big donations, too.

        No, you give the big donations to anyone who runs against him.

        -
  • by TheGreenLantern ( 537864 ) <thegreenlntrn@yahoo.com> on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:25PM (#3244404) Homepage Journal
    NO!!!! Why Adam Schiff, why? I know times have probably been tough since you lost your job as DA of New York City, but please don't sell out to the Hollywood lobby!

    Quick, someone get Ben Stone and Jack McCoy on the phone and tell them to talk some sense into the old man.

  • ...or has anyone else found it amusing that his name is Adam Schiff?

    The same name as the District Attorney character on Law & Order, (a few seasons removed)?

  • Act NOW! (Score:5, Informative)

    by Hemos (editor) ( 569506 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:26PM (#3244416) Homepage
    Don't email, don't write -- FAX!

    Go to this site: http://www.digitalconsumer.org/cbdtpa/cbdtpa-inf.h tml [digitalconsumer.org] and fill out the brief form.

    It includes a sample letter that you can editor accordingly and then it will automatically fax it to your government representatives, encouraging them to act against this bill (and potential law!).

    I Personally Recommend monolinux [monolinux.com]
    • Every 5 minutes i see someone recommending petitions. You guys have been petitioning and NOTHING HAPPENED.

      The only purpose of a petition is to let the RIAA and MPAA along with other government officials know your real names, and who you are.
      They already know 80 million napster/kaaza/gnutella users disagree with this law, they already know the main reason people got broadband was because of these technologies.

      This is war on sharing, not war on piracy.

      And all who disagree with this law need to act, telling them you disagree is not as effective as showing them, I'm not telling you to do anything violent, or illegal, but protest in more intelligent ways, begging them not to pass the law wont get you anywhere.

      They tried to beg them not to pass the DMCA, the Patriot act, and with all these users of napster and others it didnt keep the RIAA from killing it.

      Freenet, Gnutella, and stuff like that is what saved file sharing, YOU have to ACT not write letters.
      • No $hit nothing happens, because we haven't been sending them checks in our letters asking them not to screw us over.

        In this country you have to BUY a Senator before they give a rats a$$ about what you think.
      • It's not a petition you dumbass. You fill in your identifying information so they can properly address your complaint to the appropriate Senator/Representative, then FAX IT IN on your behalf. I'm sure they keep a list, just as a petition does, but the fact that it also faxes your complaint in makes it so much easier to voice your disgust with the bill (well, that and the pre-filled letter, too).


        • There were 60 million users of napster, 80 million users of fasttrack, and most likely hundreds of millions of file sharing people from hundreds of countries.

          Do you think it matters? EVEN if 90 percent of the people on the net share files, and even if 90 percent of the people who got broadband got it so they could share files, THEY DONT GIVE A DAMN

          These guys just want to pass the law because it benifits them, disney and others have bribed them with money or gifts, most likely enough money to ruin their polticial career and they obviously dont care.

          IF they cared, they wouldnt be changing the name of the bill and using weird names to make it difficult for you to protest.

          You act like this is a democracy, as if every voice counts, surprise this is a republic, if every voice counted, BUSH would not be president right now, after all he didnt win the popular vote, and he didnt really win the recount either, but the electoral college (THE JUDGE) and the system made him president.

          Its not what the people want that matters, its what the special interest groups, politciians, court system, and powerful elite whats that matter.

          The only way to get what you want, is to fight for it, asking for it wont get you anywhere.
          • by Aqualung ( 29956 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:58PM (#3244619) Homepage
            You act like this is a democracy, as if every voice counts, surprise this is a republic

            I hate to be a grammar nazi, but you misspelled 'plutocracy' =P
          • Nice cut and paste job there, idiot.

            Now to why you're wrong. A Representative is VOTED in, just like a Senator. These people don't get voted in when they don't do their jobs or listen to their constituents. You say that those people on Napster don't matter, nor do people who have broadband-- but you're wrong. If they acted together as a group, they could easily sway the vote come election time. It's called "special interest groups", and there's groups promoting black/african-american interests, women's rights interests, pro-life interests, religious interests and so forth. Isn't it about time we had a group that was interested in protecting our freedoms? Oh wait, we DO. It's called the EFF. But they need us to act on our own behalf as well, but just in concert with them.


            • Threatening not to vote for someone who only became a politician for the money, is not going to matter.

              The Napster people did just what you are recommending, the protested, by the MILLIONS! They still are protesting now by the MILLIONS.

              Its not making a diffrence, the laws are still getting worse.

              Its going to take more than protests to stop this. We need to march at washington to stop this, and protest by the millions in front of the whitehouse.

              How many of you are ready to do it? Lets decide on a date.

              • We need to march at washington to stop this, and protest by the millions in front of the whitehouse.

                Where? When? Set it up! Make it happen!

              • Lay off the crackpipe.

                There are no Napster people protesting anything. What you are calling a protest is, in fact, illegal copying. People know it too. They don't care. Just like they don't much care about driving 65 when the road is posted 55. But they're not going to go to the polls to get these things they see as petty crimes made legal.

                Even if you *could* get the non-voting half of the nation to vote, they'd just end up voting for the lesser of two evils because they don't want the other guy to win. And in this case, they'll probably vote for putzes like Hollings, because he's a Democrat which means he is probably a feminist, pro-choice, supportive of gay rights, not fanatically pro-military, sensitive to racial issues, and says lots of nice things about spending money on schools and helping people live when they're out of work (those are just examples, real liberals aren't fooled by the Democrats, we recognize that the root of the word "liberal" is the Latin "liber", "free").

                Protest away, but you're not going to be changing the world by ranting in the streets-- you're better off communicating as directly as possible with your elected officials (and don't start at the top, start at the bottom, the people at the top do go to party events, and they do have colleagues). I doubt most Americans are going to understand this one until it's too late. These are the same people who generally support the war on drugs, because how can you possibly support drugs, unless your doctor gives them to you so that you can cope with being so unhappy about your pathetic American life.

                You really want to make a difference? Run for office yourself.
          • You act like this is a democracy, as if every voice counts, surprise this is a republic, if every voice counted, BUSH would not be president right now, after all he didnt win the popular vote, and he didnt really win the recount either, but the electoral college (THE JUDGE) and the system made him president.

            Just because you say he didn't win the recounts doesn't make it so. Under every interpretation of the vote results, Algore lost and Dubya won. Deal with it.

            Furthermore, America is not a democracy, and I for one am grateful that it isn't. Democracy is, as another /.er's sig says, two wolves and a sheep deciding what to have for dinner. Our nation is a representative republic. There is a difference. Learn it, live it, love it.

            • Just because you say he didn't win the recounts doesn't make it so. Under every interpretation of the vote results, Algore lost and Dubya won.

              Not every possible interpretation. Bush would have lost without the electoral college votes from Florida. Considering the utter farce of the election process there Florida abstaining would have been perfectly reasonable behaviour.

              Furthermore, America is not a democracy, and I for one am grateful that it isn't. Democracy is, as another /.er's sig says, two wolves and a sheep deciding what to have for dinner. Our nation is a representative republic. There is a difference. Learn it, live it, love it.

              Remember though that large corporate interests and political extremists get "first dibs" on this representation...
  • Burbank is home to Der Mouse. He isn't just dependant on Disney for money, but for votes.

  • by xtermz ( 234073 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:28PM (#3244431) Homepage Journal
    For anybody to lazy (or paranoid) to click on the link:

    March 27, 2002

    Promote Consumer Use of Broadband and Prevent Digital Piracy!

    Dear Colleague

    I invite you to join me in supporting legislation that would
    encourage demand for broadband Internet service and protect
    creative enterprise from the threat of digital piracy.

    The promise of the Internet has not been fully met. While
    consumers have unprecedented access to information resources
    on the web, there is still a demand for more. Congress has
    recently debated ways to better serve our constituents by
    improving access to broadband Internet service, yet the demand
    for this technology is severely lacking. This is simply
    because consumers can't get what they want -- high quality
    digital content like movies, music, and video games.

    The reason for this has become very clear. Our nation's
    creative enterprises have been hesitant to offer their
    products over the Internet out of fear of piracy --
    intellectual theft. And their concerns are justified. The
    movie studios estimate that they lose over $3 billion annually
    to piracy, yet private industry has stalled in developing
    technology to prevent this illegal activity.

    I would like to direct your attention to the following op-ed
    written by Michael Eisner, Chairman and CEO of Disney.
    Mr. Eisner points out the profound historical significance of
    intellectual property rights and draws on one early and
    aggressive advocate of protecting such property rights, the
    16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

    I plan to introduce legislation that would safeguard digital
    content by spurring the rapid development of copyright
    protection technology. Similar legislation, S. 2048, has been
    introduced in the Senate by Senators Hollings, Stevens,
    Inouye, Breaux, Nelson and Feinstein. I believe this is a
    necessary step and I encourage you to join me in this effort.

    If you have any questions or would like to become an original
    cosponsor, please contact me or Jen Briggs of my staff at
    5-4176.

    Sincerely,
    Adam B. Schiff
    Member of Congress

  • by RyanFenton ( 230700 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:31PM (#3244446)

    Is it really possible to write what was in that letter, out of the blue, of one's free will, without coersion? I understand politicians are said to be corrupt and such - but I still find it hard to believe a sworn servant of the people would write that letter, or really sign it if he understood it.

    It's like watching an animated cow cartoon sing and dance to promote a hamburder resturant.

    He had to have just been handed it, and been asked to sign it. Perhaps I'm still naive though.

    :^)

    Ryan Fenton
  • if it does pass, expect a mass exodus of EEs, CEs and CS from this country, and whatever tech boom is occuring or about to occur, will slip. No self-respecting computer engineer or coder will not permit himself/herself to be in a place where they will not be able to innovate, as this law will discourage it and destroy it
  • by HanzoSan ( 251665 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:32PM (#3244449) Homepage Journal
    Every day, they seem to be pushing this more and more.

    People if you are going to stop this you better act FAST!!! we DONT have much time.

    I listed ways to stop this in a previous slashdot post

    Its time to take action, meaning schedule a mass protest, not a petition, but protests, on many college campus's, highschools, and online.

    If this law passes we are fucked, open source will be killed, the internet will be practically killed, broadband wont be adopted, and neither will digital tv, people will be busy using VCRs, and busy on their 56k to check their email since besides trading files theres no reason to ever upgrade to broadband.

    Previous post on slashdot, FOLLOW DIRECTIONS!


    INFORM --- Tell the public what the SSSCA is!

    Explain ---- Tell the public whats wrong with the SSSCA

    Results ---- Tell them what will happen if the SSSCA passes, and what kinda society it will lead to if the trend continues

    Solution ---- Tell them how to stop the SSSCA, tell them a msg similar to what I'm telling you, explain to them not to just stop the SSSCA, but to promote absolute freedom of speech online, meaning no one can control what you do with your computer, if the RIAA and MPAA does not want us to pirate stuff, they should make it impossible to pirate or undesirable to do so, if this means lowering the price so its not worth buying a CD or DVD burner, or if this means locking the DVD up, they have options, what they shouldnt do is take away our freedoms, its like saying you cant use your hands to draw a copy of a picture you like.
    • You're pissed?

      I live in his district, and I sent him a nice, polite, rational letter...

      And now this.

      Of course, on KPCC's "Call Sheet" [kpcc.org] - a short entertainment industry news/talk program aired during All Things Considered on the Pasadena affiliate, the host called the CBDTPA "dead on arrival." But one of the panelists put a real spin on the bill:

      Alex Ben Block of the Hollywood Star News characterized Hollings as being impatient with the content owners for not coming up with a protection standard. So Hollings wrote this bill to "motivate" the content owners to come up with a workable protection scheme. I wanted to reach though the radio and smack him so hard he spun the other way. Then the host made the DOA comment, to my relief.

      So, in addition to mailing your US Rep, send a copy to the Hollywood Star News, care of Alex Ben Block, and to KPCC [mailto]. I'd provide a link to the Hollywood Star News contact page, but I can't find any mention of the rag, not even here [losangelesalmanac.com], here [losangeles.com], or even here [cagenweb.com]. So be sure and mention Mr. Block in your correspondance to KPCC.

      • Now that I think about KPCC some more, it's probably best to send them a dedicated letter pointing out how this bill is being spun so far to the left that they're hiding the fact that this law will kill the technology market.

        Even if you don't live in SoCal, write to KPCC, because that's the station that most of the entertainment idustry gets their NPR dosage from, and NPR is good at exploring stories that get whitewashed in the commercial media. The other major NPR station in the area is KCRW in Santa Monica.

        Write specifically to Air Talk [kpcc.org], Larry Mantle's two hour issue-oriented program. It's a popular show, Larry is very interested in big stories that get ignored, and he seems very open minded, although he is by no means terse...

        Of course, you can also write to your local NPR affiliate, too.

  • Bribery? (Score:2, Interesting)

    I wonder if the representatives who are sponsoring these bills could be charged with accepting bribes? After all the US Government is supposed to be Of the people, By the people, and FOR the people. There is NO mention of commercial eneterprises in the Constitution. Any lawyers out there have a view on this?
  • by GMFTatsujin ( 239569 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:36PM (#3244476) Homepage
    Why is it *their* Internet all of a sudden? Just downloading an ISO of Redhat 7.2 takes a miniature eternity on my gigabit backbone with 100mbits to the desktop, because that's not all *my* traffic - can you imagine the sudden and continuous drain in bandwidth when anyone in my subnet decides to turn on the tube to watch Glitter?

    Okay... bad example...

    You hear about telecomm companies putting their own special networks together all the time. The entertainment industry needs to do the same. HDTVNet (or whatever they call it) can then be tightly controlled, with high-security copy protection devices all down the line, right down to the decoder on the TV. Make them completely inaccessable to the desktop - freaked out connectors, bizzare syncing and decoding strategies, whatever. No special legislation required - just technological consistancy in their own products.

    The reasons they don't do this, of course, is two-fold. One, it would be hideously expensive (although will all that piracy suddenly gone, they'd suddenly be overflowing with revenue... right?), and two...

    Well, I can't think of anybody who would go for it. Re-purchase every bit of audio/video equipment I own just to conform to the new services? I don't think so.

    Of course, it's not like I won't have to do that in the next few years anyway... Thanks, incompatable HDTV standards!
    GMFTatsujin
    • You forgot 3) (Score:3, Interesting)

      by NitsujTPU ( 19263 )
      3) Everybody thinks that their product is 10 x cooler the second it's on the Internet. They think that they are 1337 h@x0rs or something. They think that sales will go through the roof because they are a .com.

      ...perhaps they should have learned something from all of the .bombs? Yeah, but with senators in their pocket and the pocketbooks of all of their consumers to spend, they can make a bad business model work if they want to.

      Also, I don't think that setting up a network is outside of their reach, I think that most people don't seem to understand that there are networks outside of the internet, or that you could use a web site to control a tv show shown on a diff network. Oh well, so much for infrastructure.
    • They stole the internet from us. Its not ours anymore. They robbed us like the native americans.
  • by mgoyer ( 164191 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:36PM (#3244477) Homepage
    I propose that we buy our own senator since Hollings [senate.gov] was bought for as little as $300,000 [opensecrets.org].

    Only 60,000 of us would have to pitch in $5 to make our very own pro-digital consumer senator a reality.

    Matt

    • I agree. Let's set up a Pay Pal account for a Senator on the Judicial Committe who doesn't have his head up his A$$.

      Remember: "All that is required for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing." - Edmund Burke

      Let's don't let this one get by like we did the DMCA.

      Does anyone else think that this bill and the people proposing it are evil incarnate?
    • People are too cheap to actually do it.

      I told everyone to donate to the EFF, and to special interest groups which can support us, these groups do exsist, not to mention theres freenet and others

      Also you dont know how much money hollings has in stock, most likely in the millions, this is why hes so willing to ruin his political career.
      would you ruin yours for millions?
    • by dimator ( 71399 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:25PM (#3244845) Homepage Journal
      What the fuck, man. Is this what the founding fathers had in mind? Government officials making decisions based solely on who paid them and how much? This fucking sucks.

      If public servants truly had the best interests of the people in mind, they would make decisions based on what they thought would help the most -- that's what we vote for them for anyway! They shouldn't be allowed to take a fucking dime from these damn lobbyists.

    • I propose that we buy our own senator since Hollings [senate.gov] was bought for as little as $300,000 [opensecrets.org].

      God, you are so paranoid. Everyone knows that money is simply back wages from the entertainment industry to Hollings for doing the voice of Foghorn Leghorn for all those years.

  • by Archfeld ( 6757 ) <treboreel@live.com> on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:37PM (#3244485) Journal
    this, or are they that corrupt ?

    The 'industry' estimates it lost 3 billion...based on WHAT ?!?!?! Figures they had surgically removed from Sen. Hollins A$$ ??
    What is the basis for this absolute dollar value ??
    • Wow, I wish I still had my mod points. That line 'based on WHAT ?!?!?! Figures they had surgically removed from Sen. Hollins A$$ ??' almost made me fall out of my chair laughing.

      It's absolutely true though that they have no real numbers and they aren't really in the digital market at all so how could they be 'losing money'? It's like me saying I lose $100k a year because I don't work in an area with a high cost of living. I suppose I'll be drafting a letter tonight to BOTH of my congressmen instead of just one.
  • by Viogression ( 231351 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:38PM (#3244490)
    So tell me... What makes more sense? The CBDTPA? or this? [state.ky.us]
    • That's hilarious... maybe if we got rid of Disney Cruise Line the same way it would send a clear signal to the enterainment industry that we mean business ...

      PS wish I had mods, parent deserves a +1 funny
    • Offtopic, I know, but I thought people might enjoy reading the full text of that Kentucky HR Resolution:

      A RESOLUTION encouraging the purchase and vigorous use of the USS Louisville 688 VLS Class submarine.

      WHEREAS, in the past few years the scourge of the casino riverboat has been an increasingly significant presence on the Ohio River; and

      WHEREAS, the Ohio River borders the Commonwealth of Kentucky; and

      WHEREAS, the siren song of payola issuing from the discordant calliopes of these gambling vessels has led thousands of Kentucky citizens to vast disappointment and woe; and

      WHEREAS, no good can come to the citizens of Kentucky hypnotized from the siren song issuing from these casino riverboats, the engines of which are fired by the hard-earned dollars lost from Kentucky citizens;

      NOW, THEREFORE,

      Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky:

      Section 1. The House of Representatives does hereby encourage the formation of the Kentucky Navy and subsequently immediately encourages the purchase and armament of one particularly effective submarine, namely, the USS Louisville 688 VLS Class Submarine, to patrol the portion of the Ohio River under the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth to engage and destroy any casino riverboats that the submarine may encounter.

      Section 2. The House of Representatives does hereby authorize the notification of the casino riverboat consulate of this Resolution and impending whoopin' so that they may remove their casino vessels to friendlier waters.

      Thank god someone in government has a sense of humor!

      Umm... it is humor, right???

  • TV/Movies/Music is only #4 on the list of people who are funding his campaign. That's about 1/12 of his funding. The three groups above #4 have little to nothing to do with the TV/Movies/Music group. If you want to draw conclusions from this chart I would say that the senator is doing this more because he believes in it rather than people paying him to do it.
    • Don't be so sure about that... maybe he hasn't gotten money yet... but if he pushes this bill through, I'll wager that the entertainment industry will be lining up to hand him checks.

      "You know, congressman, it sure would be helpful to us (wink wink) if you could sponsor this legislation. It's for the good of the country! Think of the children! We owe it to our ancestors!"

    • At least your opionion is informed (at a minimum you clicked on the links and read something) - But your interpretation is wrong. While its 1/12 of his funding, his funding comes from a wide variety of places, each wanting something in return, and there is not much if any overlap. You said it yourself, the 3 groups above #4 have nothing to do with TV/Movies/Music. Therefore no one group out there is contributing more money to Schiff and representing an opposing view. If one had, they would be above #4 on the list and he would be sponsoring a totally different bill and writing a totally different letter to his colleagues.
    • Keep in mind that these contributions are hard monies.

      "Play by our rules and we'll run issue ads and give tons more in soft money."
  • What really bothers me about this whole thing is I have written both of my Senators and my Congressman and have heard NOTHING back. I haven't even received the usual form letter one gets when you write a politician. Guess it sorta tells you who the government listens too, and I don't mean the people they represent.
  • by PenguinX ( 18932 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:54PM (#3244600) Homepage
    From what I have read, he doesn't understand this bill fully. He's just taking it on fait that it will do what the movie companies tell him. If he actually read it and saw that it would not only be impossible to enforce, but it seems morally inexcusable from a business sense to force the technology sector to come up with methods to save content from the evils of the consumer. Then again, he may have read it and just truly agrees with the movie companies. Coming from that area in CA - I guess I could understand that. +sigh+

    But I'm preaching to the choir...
  • Actually, in this particularly rare case, he *IS* serving the interests of his constituents. One of them, anyways. Disney's HQ is in Burbank.
    • Problem is he's supposed to be representing people not companies. Remember, companies (in theory at least) are not constituents and can't (in theory) vote.

      And before anyone says it, I don't buy the "what's good for the business is good for the community" crap.

  • Popular Media (Score:3, Interesting)

    by drDugan ( 219551 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @06:59PM (#3244630) Homepage
    I have yet to see this covered in any meaningful way in the popular media (CNN/ABC/MSNBC, etc)

    Does anyone have links to existing news coverage?

    How can we get this to be covered at all? Suggestions / links / emails?

  • by paulschreiber ( 113681 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:02PM (#3244647) Homepage
    I'm sick of this "nobody wants broadband" garbage. Heck, even my mother likes having broadband to do her online banking and surf the web.

    In a letter [washingtonpost.com] to the Washington Post, Jack Valenti wrote:

    A recent survey revealed that 68 percent of all home computer users say they're satisfied with their normal 56K computer modem. It can download pretty much all that's on the Net, as not much (legal) material is out there that's chock full of graphics and in a consumer-friendly format to create the need for a cable modem or a digital subscriber line (DSL).

    My unpublished reply:

    Mr. Valenti's claim that "not much (legal) material is out there ... to create the need for a cable modem or a digital subscriber line (DSL)" is laughable.

    Obviously, Mr. Valenti hasn't attempted to download a 650 MB Debian Linux Install CD.

    Perhaps Adobe's After Effects video editing software is more his style. A 30-day trial version weighs in at a hefty 109 megabytes.

    To put it in perspective: downloading this would take over four and a half hours on a "normal 56K computer modem" -- if you're lucky enough to live in a neighbourhood with good phone lines. If, like most people, Mr. Valenti is stuck at 33.6 Kbps, it would take closer to eight hours to finish. That's enough time to watch Erich von Stroheim's Greed in its entirety.

    Paul

    • I bet Jack has broadband.

      *wink*

    • Jack Valenti writes:

      > A recent survey revealed that 68 percent of all home computer users say they're satisfied with their normal 56K computer modem. It can download pretty much all that's on the Net, as not much (legal) material is out there that's chock full of graphics and in a consumer-friendly format to create the need for a cable modem or a digital subscriber line (DSL).

      Well, of course!

      The 56k users know Congress is gonna make consumer broadband useless by banning its only killer app. Why buy a fat pipe when you know that in a year, it'll be illegal to download anything useful off it? ;-)

  • Use Bush (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Amazing Quantum Man ( 458715 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:03PM (#3244660) Homepage
    I've said it before, but I'll say it again here.

    USE BUSH!!!!

    Even if you don't like him, use him as a second line of defense. This abomination has to be signed to become law...

    Write (or fax) to Bush, and tell him to actively oppose this legislation, and to veto it if it gets passed.

    Use his biases against him:

    "Unwarranted intrusion of government into business"

    Supports the "Liberal" Hollywood Elite at the expense of our innovative tech sector

    He himself said that "I prefer innovation to litigation".

    Even if you don't personally believe these things, remember that he supposedly does. Use his biases to our advantage! The Enemy of My Enemy Is My Friend!

    • Imagine Bush on tv saying "We have to protect the security of our nation. Make no mistake about it, we will erradicate evil cyber terrorists at all costs. Protect freedom and support the war on sharing!"

      Terrorism,
      Evil,
      and Freedom, 3 words which will make all off the ignorant americans rush to stop piracy.
  • The Hollywood left put this guy in to defeat Rep. James Rogan (R), because Rogan had served as one of the House impeachment managers.

    Now, he's merely paying them back.

  • To sum it up (Score:3, Informative)

    by or_smth ( 473159 ) <(moc.liamg) (ta) (nosmidt)> on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:12PM (#3244737)
    I think the words of the immortal Thinkgeek [thinkgeek.com] can pretty much sum up the /. reader's attitudes towards 90% of senators.

    "Go away or I will replace you with a very small shell script"
  • by RealityCrutch ( 561158 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:22PM (#3244824)
    Following on the heels of the CBDTPA or SSSCA, the vast tentacle of our great leader is set to launch the Comprehensive Tract Harassing Unclean Loathsome Hacker Underground or CTHULHU.

    Referred to as an indispensable requirement of all future digital broadcasts, especially sporting events, popular HBO series, and anything with nude girls in it, the representative from the north-eastern Massachusetts district, Nyarla Thotep(D), went on to state that, "...all cryptic (sic) messages can only be protected by this new law."

    Speaking in a private symposium on the campus of the Miskatonic University [umassmiskatonic.edu] Thotep went on to say that premature revelation of encrypted messages constituted the greatest threat to our future.

    Opponents of CTHULHU point out that Thotep has long been known as a spokesman for the secretive author of the soon to be published Necronomicon, but Thotep has put off any investigation of her backers for now saying that "Soon the truth will rise from the sea drowning out the unbelievers!". When called for elaboration, Thotep refused additional comment.
  • by Lethyos ( 408045 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:23PM (#3244835) Journal
    http://www.digitalconsumer.org [digitalconsumer.org] will fax a pre-written letter to your appropriate representative for you.

    However, it misses out on one point that I think is a valuable addition to the letter. If you are going to send a letter to your reps, please consider adding this!! Here's what I wrote...

    5. It is not the responsibility of the government to ensure profitability of obsolete business models. Times are changing and technologies are rapidly evolving. Many large industry players refuse to change their business models to adapt to a changing economy and consumer base. People want the right to create mix collections of the content they purchase, the right to create personal copies, and other various rights that are clearly fair use and do not harm producers. Media industry players feel this will dissolve their profits, and therein lies the core issue driving legislation such as the CBDTPA and DMCA. This issue is the industry's refusal to adapt to the needs and desires of consumers. Traditionally, businesses provide what the customer wants, or they fail. No business has the right to man-handle consumers as the entertainment industry has. This is especially the case when what the consumers want is not piracy as large corporations would have one believe. People want free reign to use the information they own as they see fit. Not everyone will chose to use copyrighted material for the purpose of piracy. However, these bills assume all consumers are criminals and thus violate a principal American ideal: that we are innocent until proven guilty. Large corporations should not be granted greater control over media technologies and the subsequent use of content. If they are granted more power, it will only result in more vicious tactics that will both stifle technology and choice in both American and global markets.


    If everyone has suggestions, please post them there!
  • by Edmund Blackadder ( 559735 ) on Thursday March 28, 2002 @07:30PM (#3244879)
    "This is simply because consumers can't get what they want -- high quality digital content like movies, music, and video games."

    I think the consumers that want to get movies and music get them easily.

    It is quite telling that Rep Schiff does not say the true purpose of the bill, but chooses instead to conceal it in a broadband promotion language.
  • Digging Graves (Score:4, Insightful)

    by gnovos ( 447128 ) <{ten.deppihc} {ta} {sovong}> on Thursday March 28, 2002 @08:06PM (#3245152) Homepage Journal
    It's sad sad sad. It's like watching somone dig his own grave, but not knowing it's for him. Broadband is the very LAST thing the Distribution Industry wants, becuase it will allow non "approved" artists an easy and quick way to compete with them. What they DO want is a huge stumblng block in the computer indistry that will slow down the adoption and progress of new technology.
  • by Loki_1929 ( 550940 ) on Friday March 29, 2002 @12:34AM (#3246274) Journal
    You know, the first time I heard comedian George Carlin say during a performance that "this country was bought and sold a long time ago", I laughed it off as no big deal; an idea from an individual trying to entertain. When the DMCA came around, I thought, "well it's ok, it'll have amendments attatched to it to ensure nothing like the original actually makes it to law". The DMCA is now used to prosecute law-abiding people now. Now we come to the CBDTPA.

    By this point, I've lost virtually all hope for the government of my great country. I've watched as my rights have been stripped away at an unbelievable rate in the last 5 years, and it leads me to believe that all we've fought for since breaking away from Brittain in the 18th century is almost gone. In the wake of Sept 11th, our privacy has been ripped away, our innermost secrets about our supposedly private lives demanded by our government. Communications are snooped, our own spies have turned their eyes and ears on us, and our government, while becoming more secretive, has simultaneously informed us all that we, as of now, are no longer allowed secrets; at least not from them.

    And now we come to the CBDTPA, formerly known as the SSSCA. Assuming this bill makes it into law without serious modifications, we will soon see the end to entertainment as we know it. But much, much worse, we will finally know for certain that our government has been purchased from us while we weren't looking - sold to a few large corporations who will, from now on, dictate when, how, why, and if (yes if) we may lead our lives.

    This sounds so outrageously apocolyptic that many reading this will have already dismissed my posting as meaningless. However, consider this for a moment - if I told you 5 years ago that you could be jailed for informing an audience of people about a security vulnerability without ever having helped to or supplied the tools to exploit that vulnerability, would you have laughed? For anyone who works in law, if I had told you 5 years ago that making a speech that was neither slanderous nor the cause of (in the words of the Supreme Court) 'clear and present danger' (such as yelling "fire" in a crowded theatre) would cause a person to be arrested, would you not have pointed out all the reasons why this could never happen in America? How about this - if I told you 10, 20, 50 years ago that a person could be arrested and jailed for nearly four years without a trial, would you have not been outraged? (Regardless of whether he was right or wrong or whatever, he is supposed to be protected under the Constitution, and therefore is supposed to have the right to a "speedy trial".)

    Now what really concerns me here is the fact that when you look at the people in Congress who are the most supportive of the CBDTPA, you find that they are the same people who receive the most money from the entertainment industry. "This makes sense" you say, but my question is simply this - when an elected official passes bills contrary to the public interest and desire to serve the ends of his campaign contributors, how is this any different than a judge taking money from a defendant in exchange for a lighter sentence? Are they not both saying, "if you give me alot of money, I will use my power in office to ensure your interests are furthered, regardless of the public interest."? In this case, the CBDTPA continues where the DMCA left off, stripping away at what has been declared by the courts to be 'fair use'. This serves only to maintain the profit margains of the entertainment industry, while forcing yet more money out of the pockets of consumers. This most certainly doesn't help more than a few people in all of South Carolina, and certainly helps almost no minorities anywhere. Yet a democratic (democrats generally champion the rights of minorities and individuals) Senator from SC has been attempting to force this bill into law, even threatening to use his position on the appropriations and budget committees to kill funding for anyone who stands in his way. Why would a democrat from SC want to throw every bit of weight he has into such an anti-individual, pro-corporation bill? Money. The entertainment industry has, year after year, been one of Senator Ernest Fritz Hollings biggest campaign contributors. This is a simple equation folks, money for laws. You give me money, I give you laws. If a group of people raised more money for Hollings' next campaign than the entertainment industry, we could get the DMCA repealed in no time and be on our way to getting whatever laws we want on the books. This, ladies and gents, is completely pathetic. Someone ought to make an Ebay user name EFHollings and start auctioning off laws in a dutch auction; as it's what he does every day.

    While this annoyed me when I first realized it, it didn't really hit me nearly so hard as when I read this latest article, and others like it, outlining the support for this bill throughout Congress. When you look at the people pushing this bill, one by one you see they're getting most if not nearly all of their money from the entertainment industry. Carlin was right, this country is being bought and sold. The worst part is, the average person is either too stupid, too ignorant, or too apathetic to see where all this is heading, and just how far it's come in the last 5 years.

    It doesn't get much better when you look elsewhere either. In the wake of the absolute horror of September 11th, I see something even worse washing up behind it. They won. That's right, I mean the terrorists; they won. What could possibly make an American who loves his country and wants to see it become the greatest unified nation in history say such a thing? Policies, laws, etc, etc, etc. It's not the war, mind you; I'm all for wiping out all who had anything to do with what happened that day or would like to see things like it happen in the future. And I'm certainly all for turning bin Laden over to the Israelies so they can have fun with him. (Our laws just don't allow the things I want to see happen to him; they on the other hand, have no problem turning his existance into the closest thing to hell on Earth any twisted imagination could possibly come up with... gotta love Israeli intelligence ;) ) No, the war is fine. The support for the war and the President has been great. But they still won, in that they managed to allow our most basic freedoms to be either taken away or put up for review.

    Who would have objected to a strip search every time you walk into the airport 5 years ago? My goodness, such an idea would have brought outrage and shock. But since September 11th, people want to feel warm and cozy and safe, and they seem to think all this new security, like this x-ray machine [techtv.com] that allows screeners to do a virtual strip search of you. Most people seem to be under the dillusion that in 10 years it'll all be back to normal and we'll all go about like we do now. I can only hope so, but once this technology is widely available and fairly cheap, I can see everyone from government to corporations, to schools putting this in and refining it further. Personally, I'm extremely offended by the idea of any fool off the street (yes, the security personnel at airports are usually but not always lacking in the mental dept.) being able to get a pretty graphic shot of my entire body. Why? Well, invasion of privacy is the easy one. But how about this one? In this country, we work under a system that you are innocent until proven guilty. Now, in this situation, I fully understand that increased security must allow for a bit of elasticity here. In this case, feel free to xray the hell out of my luggage until my underwear bakes if it makes you happy. As for me, I'll happily go through your metal detector if it makes you happy; it'll certainly make me a little happier to see everyone else going through it. And feel free to run my name against a list of known terrorists. If something comes up funny, pull me aside and we'll have a chat. With none of this do I have a problem. Want to put armed air marshals on every flight? By all means, hell, I'll pay a little extra on my ticket if it ensures there's a couple on my plane. Just make sure they're not psychotic, stupid, incapable or unwilling to perform as needed, and not themselves terrorists. I'm sure there are many other wonderful security ideas we can come up with that don't involve Sgt Ricky and Officer Mickey staring at my unclothed body when all I want to do is go to Cali for a holiday trip.

    Other examples of this include carnivore, which was pushed up after Sept 11th, and this stuff I keep hearing about the government using trojans to extract (or possibly inject) incriminating evidence from computers of US citizens. I'm reasonably confident that my paranoid security setup will insulate me fairly well from this silly toy (I hear it could have been better coded by a 12yo) but for all the clueless users out there (5 9's of them.. ie. 99.999%) I feel it's an outrageous violation of their right to privacy and their presumed innocence. Not to mention the fact that the potential for abuse is so extreme, it boggles the mind as to how in the world this wouldn't get all FBI/CIA/NSA folks having anything to do with this arrested immediately. You can hack into my computer and plant evidence and I'll go to jail for 10+ years, but if I hack into your computers and do nothing more than type ls/dir for 6 hours over and over, I'll go to jail for 10+ years. Hmm... do as I say, not as I do?

    So in the last 5 or so years, we've seen fair use, freedom of speech, presumed innocence, privacy, and many, many other basic Constitutionally guaranteed rights disappear. And now it looks like our government officials could be spending half their time in eBay private auctions to see who gets the laws they wanted for christmas.

    I think I'll move to Holland now. Dutch people are pretty cool.

  • by JFTaylor ( 266253 ) on Friday March 29, 2002 @02:40AM (#3246568) Homepage
    ..is that the very products they peddle are NOT integral parts of our lives. Their output is something I (we ALL) can do without. I have more CDs and VHS tapes than I know what to do with, and quite frankly, I am ashamed I bought as many as I did. But what Valenti, Eisner and others fail to realize is, WE DON'T HAVE TO HAVE THEIR "content." It's not food, water, or shelter they are providing. They should think about this before they start trying to strangle the life out of their ONLY customer base.

    I can think of plenty of things to do which don't involve movies or music. With the books I've accumulated from book clubs and second-hand shops (the "I'm gonna get to those someday" pile of books), I could read 1 book a week and probably die before I finished them all. I have enough music that I can cycle through the CDs until hell freezes over before I listen to a CD twice. *grin*

    So you see, I am certainly writing my senators, congressmen, local newspapers, and just about any person who has an interest (or even unintentional interest) in this legislation. I am not optimistic I am getting through to ANYONE , though. So, if this passes, I have my old computers, my old TV, my old VCR, my old Dreamcast, and all those "unprotected" books, CDs and classic movies. I just won't buy any more crap. So what? It's not hurting ME that I don't buy their junk.

    ...now as long as I don't break my glasses like Burgess Meredith, I'll be fine. *GRIN*

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