Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Censorship EU Your Rights Online

EU ACTA Chief Resigns 253

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-this-treaty-and-shove-it dept.
bs0d3 writes "The EU ACTA chief has resigned, saying, 'This agreement might have major consequences on citizens' lives, and still, everything is being done to prevent the European Parliament from having its say in this matter. That is why today, as I release this report for which I was in charge, I want to send a strong signal and alert the public opinion about this unacceptable situation. I will not take part in this masquerade.' 22 EU members signed the controversial ACTA treaty Thursday in Tokyo."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

EU ACTA Chief Resigns

Comments Filter:
  • by ToiletBomber (2269914) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:09AM (#38837083)
    I think my faith in humanity might yet be vindicated.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:12AM (#38837093)
      Apparently you've missed the Republican Presidential race.
  • Call me picky but... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Corporate T00l (244210) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:12AM (#38837091) Journal

    "News sites" hosted on port 82 set off some alarm bells. That being said, this piece has been picked up by other news sites with more direct citations. Techdirt (http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120126/11014317553/european-parliament-official-charge-acta-quits-denounces-masquerade-behind-acta.shtml) and The Register (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/01/27/eu_signs_acta/) both have articles that are worth reading.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      "News sites" hosted on port 82 set off some alarm bells.

      So why don't you fill us in then? What is so suspicious about using port 82? Is that port often used by pedophiles or terrorists? Is that the port that the NSA uses to spy on people?

      Inquiring minds want to know.

      • by Rockoon (1252108) on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:12AM (#38837285)

        What is so suspicious about using port 82?

        Because its not 80. Why isnt this alleged news site (that is either down or is slashdotted right now) not using the standard http port?

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          What is so suspicious about using port 82?

          Because its not 80

          That's a circular argument. Care to elaborate?

          I have to defend this argument (that port 82 is inherently suspicious) in a thesis paper. If you can give me the answer before 9:00 AM EST you will have saved me from failure, and possibly protected me from ruining my life (by inadvertently using port 82 to read news articles).

          Thanks in advance!

        • Perhaps because they're not a huge shop, can't afford the kind of security personnel Sony have (fnar fnar), and someone told them that not using the most commonly associated port with a specific service can help protect against automated attacks at the expense of minimal cost to the consumer.

          Perhaps.
      • by geogob (569250) on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:19AM (#38837327)

        The whole idea of a "news site" is to be openly accessible. A website on a non-standard port is still openly accessible, but only to those who know the site is accessibly through this port. This knowledge may either be direct or indirect (like through a link like here).

        Basically, its a news site only accessible to the general public through linking. This points a lot to "targeted news", which also tend to point into the direction of "false news" and/or "propaganda". Now, I'm not implying this is the case here. In fact, there are many other possible explanation, one of them being the one I just provided. As the previous post said, it "sets off some alarm bells", but it doesn't necessarily mean something foul is going on. It's just weird.

        As for your open, trollishy questions, I'll say this. Many illegal activities that are performed on the web, regardless of their nature, do so on sites accessible only through nonstandard ports, like port 82, to hide the said activities from general view. Only those within intimate knowledge of the activities know the ports and can thus access those sites.

        • The whole idea of a "news site" is to be openly accessible. A website on a non-standard port is still openly accessible, but only to those who know the site is accessibly through this port.

          ... and most importantly, it is only accessible to those not behind a coproate firewall which only lets 80 through.

          This knowledge may either be direct or indirect (like through a link like here).

          Well, the link was present in the Slashdot summary, so it's not a question about knowledge. And a link would have been needed even on a site hosted on port 80, as there are many pages on a site, and the link allows to directly go to the page of interest.

          As for your open, trollishy questions, I'll say this. Many illegal activities that are performed on the web, regardless of their nature, do so on sites accessible only through nonstandard ports, like port 82, to hide the said activities from general view. Only those within intimate knowledge of the activities know the ports and can thus access those sites.

          Indeed. Not only corporate firewalls think that all web sites are on port 80, so do many network sniffers. Thus using a non-standard port is a

    • Port racism!

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:18AM (#38837321)

      Mr Kader Arif gave some insight here [numerama.com]:

      (french) http://www.numerama.com/magazine/21424-acta-demissionnaire-kader-arif-denonce-une-mascarade.html
      (google tr) http://translate.google.fr/translate?sl=fr&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=fr&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.numerama.com%2Fmagazine%2F21424-acta-demissionnaire-kader-arif-denonce-une-mascarade.html&act=url

      "I want to denounce as the greatest of all the process that led to the signing of this agreement: no association of civil society, lack of transparency from the beginning of negotiations, successive postponements of the signing of the text without no explanation was given, setting aside the claims of the European Parliament, however, expressed in several resolutions of this assembly, "he complains.

      The MEP also confirms what we reported on the schedule to the charge imposed for parliamentary committees to express their views on the content of the agreement. "As the reporter on this text, I also faced unprecedented maneuvers of the right of Parliament to impose an accelerated schedule to pass the agreement as soon as possible before the public is alerted, denying that the European Parliament's right of expression and the tools at its disposal to carry the legitimate demands of citizens. "

      For Kader Arif, "everyone knows, the ACTA has greement problem, whether its impact on civil liberties, responsibilities it imposes on providers of Internet access, impact on the manufacture of generic drugs and the lack of protection it offers to our geographical indications ".

      "This agreement can have major consequences on the lives of our citizens, and yet everything is done for the European Parliament has no say. So today, in submitting this report in my charge, I wants to send a strong signal and alert the public about this unacceptable situation. I will not participate in this charade. "

    • "News sites" hosted on port 82 set off some alarm bells.

      ... and they also tend to crumble lots quicker under the slashdot...

    • In this new fangled hypertext thing, you can actually post that as links to TechDirt [techdirt.com] and The Register [theregister.co.uk] instead of making us type it in the address bar

      But thanks for pointing is to some helpful information

    • IF you want to run e.g. Apache and IIS on the same machine, they can't both use the same ports. I've been in this situation before, and had to run one of my servers on a different port, IIRC it was 81. So maybe this chap's got three webservers?

  • by phantomfive (622387) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:13AM (#38837101) Journal
    It's not the first time the government of the EU has made decisions that hurt the people, using tricks to get them past the populace. And it won't be the last. We can expect a lot of bad stuff coming up, with the economic crisis.
    • by Teun (17872)
      What does this personal action of a politician have to do with an economic crisis?
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by alci63 (1856480)
        Making decisions without taking the people into account is becoming quite common these days in EU. Crisis is the best justification they found. When Papaandreou said he will make a referendum, he was dismissed. An ex-banker is now leading the country. In Italy, it was decided (not by the people) the government should be changed. An ex-banker is now leading the country. See this http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/37700.html [quotationspage.com] ... So the fact that governments are making EU level decisions without consulting th
        • by Teun (17872) on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:57AM (#38837477) Homepage
          In Italy it was decided and approved in and by the elected parliament they needed a different government than the one led by Berlusconi.

          Of course the rest of Europe put a lot of pressure on the Italians to get this change of government but it was and still is still 100% in the power of the parliament to agree with the new governments policies or ultimately send it home.

          The Greek situation is from a democratic point of view not much different, parliament can send their government packing at any moment it no longer agrees with the policies proposed.

          Since last year the EU has become closer to the electorate now the EU parliament can veto policies put forward by the commission. These EU commission policies don't fall from the sky, they are the result of lengthy deliberations between the governments of the member states who also have to answer to their parliaments at home.

          So when you, like me, are not happy with the signing of the ACTA agreement you should also contact your local politicians, not just the MEP's.

          • by Mashiki (184564)

            Yep. Nothing quite like a quasi-binding non-elected government body dictating to a sovereign nation on what they should do on their internal affairs. You forgot to mention about them wanting to siphon off a few trillion euros and be immune from prosecution though.

            • The argument that the EU is evil because they removed Berlusconi from office seems sort of strange to me. He was a mob boss. If that is the worst example of EU conduct you can come up with they must be a fairly reasonable bunch.
          • by cpu6502 (1960974)

            Except the new Italian PM was never an elected minister by the People. He simply showed-up in the parliament one day, out of nowhere.

    • by Anzya (464805)

      That is because people don't know their history regarding EU. When it first started it was an economic union. The target was to help companies, not the people. Since then it has changed it's name but I belive that its root values are still there. There are people who try to change it though.

    • The EU? Find me a government that hasn't done that.
  • I think it would fix so many problems...

    • by lennier1 (264730)

      Probably not the best idea.
      What's to gain if the all remaining politicians with at least microscopic remnants of a backbone resigned as well?

  • by Zandamesh (1689334) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:23AM (#38837123)

    What we need is a simple webpage with links to complete tutorials of how to protest this for each country, where people can edit the tutorials, like, a wikipedia for protests. I don't know how to create such a website quickly, but I'm sure some guys on Slashdot could whip out something like this in a couple of hours.

    • by JaredOfEuropa (526365) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:39AM (#38837171) Journal
      Once again the French come through:How to act against ACTA [laquadrature.net].

      In addition, if you're a member or supporter of any national party in Europe, lean on your party's committee members as well. Often they have a large influence on their EU counterparts, and don't forget that your own governments still have to ratify the treaty.

      Sadly, it looks like in many countries ACTA will sail through the ratification process: at that point most ruling parties will already have given it their implicit endorsement, and they might look silly nacking out now. Rebelious coalition members might vote in favour as well, out of political expedience. If the EU parliament does not kill this, I guess it'll be too late.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Khyber (864651)

      "What we need is a simple webpage"

      What you need is to grow a pair and shoot the bastards responsible for this.

      • corrupted politicians are like pirate sites:
        cut one head and 2 grow back....

      • by Zouden (232738)

        Thanks for the suggestion, Jared. [wikipedia.org]

      • What you need is to grow a pair and shoot the bastards responsible for this.

        Unfortunately, here in Europe, we don't have a Second Amendment yet: we only get the crap laws from the US, never the good stuff!

  • by Trapezium Artist (919330) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:24AM (#38837129)

    What can I say? I'm very pleased that Kader Arif had the guts to make his disgust with the ACTA process known so publicly. His actions deserve to be widely recognised outside the tech community as well as within; we should ensure that "regular" media outlets cover this part of the story.

    Will his stand bring down the entire shameful edifice that is ACTA? No. Is it an important part of the battle that is being fought and must continue to be fought? Yes.

    • OK, but what is he going to do next? If he feels so strongly about this, why did he not remain in his position and use that power more constructively? This isn't likely to be put in front of the E.U. parliament before June so who is this going to notice this 'falling on my sword act' apart from those who already oppose this, i.e. Slashdotters and the like. I'll gladly eat my words if this makes national news anywhere.
      • Exactly. My first thought was "Finally we have a politician worth his salt, and then he quits".
      • by Rakarra (112805) on Friday January 27, 2012 @06:31AM (#38837617)

        OK, but what is he going to do next? If he feels so strongly about this, why did he not remain in his position and use that power more constructively? This isn't likely to be put in front of the E.U. parliament before June so who is this going to notice this 'falling on my sword act' apart from those who already oppose this, i.e. Slashdotters and the like.

        Sometimes you are put into a token position where you have no real power, where no one has to answer to you and you can enact no policies. Not uncommon in, say, a sham investigation. In that case his only power is to resign in the most public and shaming manner possible.

        • Despite it getting modded down above, I'll try one more time.

          Why did he wait until *after* the countries signed (provisionally, etc)? Surely he knew his findings last week? So why didn't he resign on opening of business Monday?

      • by Capitaine (2026730) on Friday January 27, 2012 @06:33AM (#38837631)
        Just checked out the 3 major French (Le Monde, Liberation, Le Figaro) and German (Frankfurter Algemein, Süddeutscher Zeitung, Die Welt) newspaper website. No trace of the ACTA. Nothing more in economical newspapers. Your words are safe.
        • Confirming this. A google.de news search for the the guy's name returns results from many European nations, especially Austria. Germany is conspicuously absent. Living in Germany at the moment I can also confirm in general that the German media is in the pocket of big business. They hide it better than most but if you look closely the evidence is there. Is there anything we can do to expose their lack of ethics?
    • by Ihmhi (1206036)

      "ACTA? It's like that SOAP or PIPE thing them kids been screamin' about on the Facebooks? Who cares, let those cheese-eating surrender monkeys go out and buy some good ol' American films, the thievin' little shits!"

    • Yeah, Arif Kader is one of the unreasonable ones. And thank fuck for that!

      I'm pissed at all those "reasonable" politicians that will merrily let the world go to shit.

  • 'This agreement might have major consequences on citizens' lives'
    • by JavaBear (9872) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:40AM (#38837173)

      "might"?

      There is nothing "might" about it. It will have devastating effect on a lot of law-abiding users, and probably very little on the less law-abiding users, if not outright help the "pirates" in the long run.
      But it will criminalize the majority of the internet users.

      • by petman (619526) on Friday January 27, 2012 @04:46AM (#38837195)
        Since ACTA is yet to be passed by the parliaments, then "might" is the right word.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by analyst-cz (1386075)
        It is still underestimated by EU governments, that repression can be successful (victorious) in long run only if it is supported at least by the "silent majority" of public. This is not, or at least will not, be the case of ACTA, if ever tried to be really enforced. There REALLY SHOULD be some official government security advisor, that can put together several bits proved by the true human history:
        1) "Bread and games" concept and fall of the Roman empire once it (for any good reason) was unwilling or unabl
  • The American Mafia that is terrorising the other (EU, and then some) countries (bribing, black-mailing, pressuring, whatever) should be arrested by "your" patriot act and sent to guatanamo. They are a menace not only to the life of every American, as to the whole world.

    I never thought that my generation would ever get the world to this state. Seems we were a bad batch... "I don't want to live in this world anymore..."

  • awww sh*t! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by gciochina (1655025) on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:04AM (#38837253)
    I'm from Romania and I think I can say that I've been actively involved in "down with SOPA/PIPA" movement... and, for now, looks like we've won a battle on these two. However, i'm getting really worried about the whole ACTA stuff, because I don't think that we'll ever manage to get that much support for an anti-ACTA movement. Right now, at least two of the guys (Romanians) we've got in the EU parliament are certified retards and i'm pretty sure that they'll never consider the full implications of their vote on this one. The most disturbing thing is that the majority of the population hasn't even heard of ACTA, SOPA, PIPA... let alone ever heard of what they stand for and how will these change their lives. Without a huge move like the one made by Reddit/ Wikipedia/ Google & Co/ etc we'll never be able to stop it. Right now, the only thing i can think of is FML :(.
    • by dokc (1562391)

      Without a huge move like the one made by Reddit/ Wikipedia/ Google & Co/ etc we'll never be able to stop it.

      You must have some important (and independent) site which can black-out Internet. ACTA will hit hard on ISP's, it must be a chance that they can put a pop-up Web Page once per day or every few hours explaining to Internet users whats going on? Or they are just in the hands of politicians who signed the ACTA?

  • by sugarmotor (621907) on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:06AM (#38837259) Homepage

    URL: http://activepolitic.com:82/News/2012-01-26d/EU_ACTA_chief_resigns_in_disgust_over_disrespect_at_citizens.html [activepolitic.com]

            Connection to 64.30.66.124 failed.

    The system returned: (111) Connection refused

    Here's some alternative, https://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/ACTA_rapporteur_denounces_ACTA_mascarade [laquadrature.net] which quotes from Kader Arif's blog:

    http://www.kader-arif.fr/actualites.php?actualite_id=147 [kader-arif.fr]

  • by BeforeCoffee (519489) on Friday January 27, 2012 @05:06AM (#38837265)

    It's probably best for himself and his family that he made a big show of his dissent like this. There's probably some angry, big moneyed cockroaches that are scurrying after the light was shone on their big bureaucratic power grab.

    These fat media/government cockroaches are appearing more and more desperate, no?

    It's just a matter of time till the lazy-ass 1337 network hackers get their collective acts together and start shunting their god-given right to free traffic off onto a pure P2P, encrypted, usually-connected, fido-net style worldwide wireless network grid a la "media net" from The Diamond Age by Neil Stephenson.

    "The media net was designed from the ground up to provide privacy and security, so that people could use it to transfer money. That’s one reason the nation-states collapsed – as soon as the media grid was up and running, financial transactions could no longer be monitored by governments."

    'Monitored' is post-central-government era term that means the same as 'controlled'. In our lifetimes, there will be no centralized corporate/governmental infrastructure worth controlling. And the most delicious part: their goofy special protections for DRM in the 90's will be their undoing.

    Computer networks, exchange and value, ideation and realization - these have all become interlinked concepts. The hub is the network.

    Guess what, cockroaches? The democracy genie is outta the bottle, and it has been for 15 years. These desperate, piddly attempts of yours to stuff it back in the bottle won't work for long. (And if the people would just WAKE UP, they won't work at all!)

    • Guess what, cockroaches? The democracy genie is outta the bottle, and it has been for 15 years. These desperate, piddly attempts of yours to stuff it back in the bottle won't work for long.

      It's funny for me to read this not two minutes after I finished Roger Hutchinson's book High Sixites, a sweeping view of 1960s youth culture. The final pages are an interview with the artist Jeff Nuttall held in 1991, at the end of the Thatcher era. Nuttall poignantly recalls that he thought at the time that his generation had triumphed, that conservative forces should just step out of the way since they had already plainly lost. And then came two decades (and more) that did away with all that they had accomplished, and with their hope itself.

      For our own generation, the genie may well go back in the bottle...

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by MatthiasF (1853064)
        Every generation grows up thinking it invented revolution, rebellion, drug-use, sex, and a new world.

        Every generation becomes a teenager and picks something the government is doing, thinks it's wrong and protests.

        But every generation grows up and eventually realizes they were really dumb when they were younger after they learn every generation before them did the same thing and it made no difference.
    • "It's just a matter of time till the lazy-ass 1337 network hackers get their collective acts together and start shunting their god-given right to free traffic off onto a pure P2P, encrypted, usually-connected, fido-net style worldwide wireless network grid"

      Go support Freenet. It's all of those things except the wireless, which may be added on with ease once node density increases. We're having retention issues at the moment, so if you'd run a node or two with a terabyte-sized store and a fair amount of ban
  • by benjfowler (239527) on Friday January 27, 2012 @08:06AM (#38838047)

    I think this is quite interesting.

    The EU has always been a neoliberal political project designed to benefit big business. Single huge parket, mobililty of labour, single currency, decisions taken by unelected bureaucrats... it's all designed to enrich well-connected big businessmen.

    But the problem with all this, is that they have to make a show of democratic legitimacy through what has been an utterly irrelevant European Parliament. But it seems that real people have other ideas... the youth these days are pan-European, with Erasmus scholarships and whatnot, people study, travel, holiday, fall in love and start families across a borderless Europe. So political legitimacy of a united Europe has become more important, and we're seeing a gradual strengthening of pan-European civil society, helped in part by the internet, and cheap flights. The demand of ordinary people for a fair say in how their continent is run is irresistable.

    Naturally, the crooks, rent-seekers and kleptocrats want "their" Europe back, and are trying to hide their scheming and plotting away from public scrutiny. Look at how the criminals overthrew the democratically-elected governments in Greece and Italy, and replaced them with "their" people as unelected dictators (bankers from Goldman Sachs, the same criminals who engineered the global financial crisis, no less).

    The business class are the worst hypocrites imaginable -- they LOVE democracy, when it opens up free markets for their goods and services and drives down the cost of labour, but turn on open society like rabid pigs when it doesn't serve their interests.

    It's not surprising in the least that they would seek to bypass democratic oversight of their latest blatent power grab.

  • by X.25 (255792)

    So, he resigned to 'send a message', and now they'll simply hire someone who will be 'compliant' and keep his mouth shut. :tinfoil:

The superior man understands what is right; the inferior man understands what will sell. -- Confucius

Working...