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ACTA Signed By 22 EU Countries 138

Posted by timothy
from the bad-acta-ors dept.
First time accepted submitter azrael29a writes "22 EU members signed the controversial ACTA treaty today in Tokyo. However, the signatures of the EU member states and the EU itself will count for nothing unless the European Parliament gives its approval to ACTA in June."
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ACTA Signed By 22 EU Countries

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  • by Local ID10T (790134) <ID10T.L.USER@gmail.com> on Thursday January 26, 2012 @01:59PM (#38830979) Homepage

    Just say no to ACTA.

    • Re:Say no to ... (Score:5, Informative)

      by The Archon V2.0 (782634) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:00PM (#38831003)
      The people say "no", but their masters seem pretty eager to say "yes".
      • Re:Say no to ... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by johnvile (2560845) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:06PM (#38831089)
        There Masters aren't saying "Yes" there saying "yes yes yes" whilst the American government rams law up there ass.
        • Re:Say no to ... (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Dyinobal (1427207) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:30PM (#38831393)
          It isn't so much the American government as the corporations, who don't really have a nationality.
          • by TaoPhoenix (980487) <TaoPhoenix@yahoo.com> on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:32PM (#38831427) Journal

            Borrowing Animal Farm:

            "And then they looked from the government to the corporation, from the corporations back to the government, and they were unable to tell the difference."

            • WHich raises the question, why do conservatives (read: folks who want a smaller government) get so much flak on slashdot?

              I mean, i know the meme is "conservatives are in bed with the corps", but that reputation is only there because we oppose reams of regulation. Personally, I feel like you have to keep a balance between the two, and I feel like the balance is currently shifted to the "too much government" end of the spectrum.

              So next time you jump on a republican's case for being a corporate shill or whate

              • by P-niiice (1703362)
                Conservatives also support outsourcing, huge CEO salaries, tax breaks for corporations, eminent domain, corporate personhood, citizens united..... not just removal of regulations.
                • Conservatives also support outsourcing

                  Says who? Oh, you mean we oppose heavy-handed legislation on outsourcing?

                  huge CEO salaries,

                  Says who? Oh, you mean we oppose legislation on how a private company can spend its own money? Yea, I do oppose that.

                  tax breaks for corporations

                  I dont think all conservatives would agree with this. You would have to spell out more clearly your proposal before I could make a judgement call; certainly some tax breaks I might support and others I would oppose.

                  eminent domain

                  Wait, what???? Where did you hear THAT?

                  corporate personhood

                  Again, over generalizing. I dont think being a conservative me

          • by Serpents (1831432)
            Why not? I thought the corporations in the US had personhood. Doesn't it mean they should have nationalities? Doesn't it mean we should be able to put them in jail? Or is it all rights without any of the obligations? /sarcasm
          • by Heed00 (1473203)
            Well, the corporations buy the influence of governments, so it becomes quite difficult to tell where one begins and the other ends -- making the distinction rather moot.
        • by DragonTHC (208439)

          back to school, you!

        • by Hentes (2461350)

          Not trying to defend ACTA but the final version of it had changed a lot during the negotiations so claiming that they did what America told them is not true.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by Anonymous Coward

            How can you tell? The final version still isn't publicly available. Whose word are you believing?

        • by Brain-Fu (1274756) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @04:14PM (#38832781) Homepage Journal

          The wealthy members of every nation are, naturally, united in their desire to remain wealthy. The introduction of globally-enforced artificial scarcity appears to be a great way of doing that. It isn't like the wealthy members of EU would rather see ACTA vanish, but are bowing their heads in submission to America. They are happily jumping at the chance to enter into such an agreement, because it directly benefits them. Or so they think.

          Such oppression will only fan the flames of rebellion, and law enforcement will always have limits.

          • by Anonymous Coward

            There is no way that this can work in the long run.

            The sole raw material for intellectual property is human brains. There are a lot more Chinese human brains than there are Amercan.

      • Only because the masters masters ordered them to say "yes, please".

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Elected representatives aren't the masters of anyone. They may misrepresent, and get voted out, but ultimately they are paid to do what the electorate want. It's not their, yours or my fault that the electorate, in general, are clueless about the power they are giving people, and not being picky who they give it to.

        • "ultimately they are paid to do what the electorate want"

          Except when they aren't.

          Electorate: we'll pay you 100.000 eur/year to do your job now.

          Megacorp: do your job now and I'll pay you 2.000.000 eur/year plus bonus and benefits to do basically nothing except getting to know the kind of people that will make you these kind of offers (a decorative VP).

          Now, who do you think that *really* pay them ultimately?

    • by Zumbs (1241138)
      ... but, but we are being paid so much money to say yes. Besides, how can we refuse those nice people when they pull out the puppies?
    • Re:Say no to ... (Score:5, Informative)

      by rhook (943951) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @09:46PM (#38835651)

      Obama claims he is against SOPA and PIPA yet he signed ACTA last year.

      http://www.webpronews.com/president-obama-doesnt-support-sopa-but-signs-acta-2012-01 [webpronews.com]

      • Obama claims he is against SOPA and PIPA yet he signed ACTA last year.

        He signed ACTA while it was still under the radar.

    • by siddesu (698447)

      It is not enough. The process is skewed heavily in favor of the right holders and their government representatives. Even the rapporteur for ACTA at the European Parliament thinks so: https://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/ACTA_rapporteur_denounces_ACTA_mascarade [laquadrature.net]

      It is a lost fight unless everyone in Europe picks the phone to their EMP and tells them in no uncertain terms to vote ACTA down or lose votes. And then have all your friends do so too.

  • by Ragun (1885816) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:00PM (#38830991)
    Sure, its my signature, but I take no responsibility for any decisions.

    Gotta love politics.
  • Such a lively, relevant discussion!

  • by icebraining (1313345) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:04PM (#38831061) Homepage

    A French MEP has quit the process of scrutinising ACTA for the European Parliament, calling the treaty's passage through the EU legislative system a masquerade.

    In a statement on Thursday, Kader Arif denounced the signing of ACTA (the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) by the EU and 21 member states earlier in the day. He said the European Parliament was being undermined and the process was a "charade" in which he would no longer participate.
    (..)
    "I want to denounce as the greatest of all the process that led to the signing of this agreement: no association of civil society, lack of transparency from the beginning of negotiations, successive postponements of the signing of the text without any explanation being given, setting aside the claims of the European Parliament [despite those views being] expressed in several resolutions of our Assembly," Arif said, according to an automated translation of his statement.

    Arif said he had as rapporteur "faced unprecedented manoeuvres of the right of Parliament to impose an accelerated schedule to pass the agreement as soon as possible before the public is alerted, thereby depriving Parliament of its right of expression and the tools at its disposal to carry the legitimate demands of citizens".
    (...)
    "This agreement may [have a] major impact on the lives of our citizens, and yet everything is done [so that] the European Parliament has no say," Arif said. "I will not participate in this charade."

    http://www.zdnet.co.uk/blogs/communication-breakdown-10000030/mep-quits-acta-charade-in-protest-at-eu-signing-10025297/ [zdnet.co.uk]

    • by Anonymous Coward

      "I want to denounce as the greatest of all the process that led to the signing of this agreement: no association of civil society, lack of transparency from the beginning of negotiations, successive postponements of the signing of the text without any explanation being given, setting aside the claims of the European Parliament [despite those views being] expressed in several resolutions of our Assembly," Arif said, according to an automated translation of his statement.

      Shortly after, the automated translation was pulled and the text now reads "I totally agree with ACTA! Hoo-ah!", as read the original statement by the French MEP.

    • by o'reor (581921)
      Thanks for posting that, you beat me to it :-)
    • by jamstar7 (694492)
      And yet 22 EU countries signed the damned thing.

      Meaningless of course til it's ratified, but that won't stop the lobbyists in the US from pushing through all kinds of nasty shit like SOPA and PIPA. Gotta keep up with the Euros, ya know. And if the member-states of the EU don't ratify this, oh, well, at least American copyrights are safe the world over now. Send in the Marines & the lawyers, there's money to loot!
    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:26PM (#38831349)

      And for US citizens, you can sign a petition [whitehouse.gov] to challenge ACTA after being signed into law as an executive agreement -- which doesn't require approval -- when it covers intellectual property, which requires ratification in Congress. Techdirt has more information [techdirt.com].

      If you want to go further, you can contact Senator Ron Wyden [wikipedia.org], who also questions the constitutionality of ACTA [slashdot.org].

      • And for US citizens, you can sign a petition [whitehouse.gov] to challenge ACTA after being signed into law as an executive agreement -- which doesn't require approval -- when it covers intellectual property, which requires ratification in Congress.

        I think you're making an unsupported leap there in that "doesn't require approval". TechDirt suggests that that could be true, but doesn't say it's more than "a pretty strong argument".

        It's also an incorrect argument. Contrary to what TechDirt thinks about ACTA, it's non-implementing. In that sense, it's exactly the same as TRIPs, which was also an "executive agreement... cover[ing] intellectual property," but was never ratified by Congress. Instead, Congress passed the Uruguay Round Agreements Act, which

  • by korgitser (1809018) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:09PM (#38831139)

    I am from Estonia and our internet community has managed to put the ACTA issues into the public debate here. The politicians still seem unwilling to tackle the issues raised; furthermore, it seems they were about to sign it without reading it - even to the point where our local RIAA lackey was the one explaining the "governments position" on the TV yesterday. I do not know where this will end and while our government seems to be afraid to say no, we will not go down without a fight.

    • by edgrale (216858)

      Countries that signed are "EU and its Member States that signed the Agreement at this ceremony are: the EU, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) "

      http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/economy/i_property/acta1201.html

      • by KDR_11k (778916)

        What I find odd is that Germany didn't sign it. That's the biggest economic power in the EU. I'd like to see the reason for that.

        • by zooblethorpe (686757) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @04:00PM (#38832581)

          What I find odd is that Germany didn't sign it. That's the biggest economic power in the EU. I'd like to see the reason for that.

          I think you've answered your own question. They are solidly standing on their own feet, and thus are less willing to bend over in response to bullying.

          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by Anonymous Coward

            Sadly not. Germany's chancellor Angela Merkel couldn't bend over more for her American heroes. Germany doesn't need to be bullied. The conservative party just needs to find a way to get ACTA past the populace without catapulting the Pirate Party into all state parliaments at the earliest opportunity. The conservatives are also somewhat hampered by their junior partner, the liberal democrats, whose Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger is head of the ministry of justice and annoyingly appears to have a spine. I

            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by Anonymous Coward

              For our American and Canadian readers; in Germany (and most other European countries) every vote counts. This means that your % of popular vote more or less directly translates into % of seats. This is called "equal representation".

              For our European friends; in the US and Canada not every vote counts. Take for instance Canada. For Federal/National elections, the country is being cut in 388 little areas, called "ridings". The best way to explain is that, aside from a "national election" with "national candida

              • by Formalin (1945560)

                Yep, first past the post is an archaic thing from the cave era, horribly undemocratic.

                So you have a four way race, with results of 25%, 25%, 24%, and 26%... and the person with 26% ends up representing all of the voters, even though three quarters of which may be vehemently opposed to them. Very democratic.

    • by blind biker (1066130) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:27PM (#38831363) Journal

      I do not know where this will end and while our government seems to be afraid to say no, we will not go down without a fight.

      The Poles are fighting it, too. [bbc.co.uk]

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        I've been on the big protest on Wednesday, and as of now several more protests are being planned throughout the country. There's one for tommorow in Warsaw.

        What I can't understand is what the fuck is our prime minister doing, thinking he can ignore the voice of tens of thousands of angry people on the streets. It's basically the biggest protest in 30 years, and that previous one was the whole "Solidarnosc" thing.

        We are fucking outraged at our gov't.
        They will not get re-elected.

        • What I can't understand is what the fuck is our prime minister doing, thinking he can ignore the voice of tens of thousands of angry people on the streets. It's basically the biggest protest in 30 years, and that previous one was the whole "Solidarnosc" thing.

          Oh, that little protest? The one that basically toppled the communist regime? Yeah, I think you Poles do take your protests seriously.

        • by KiloByte (825081)

          We are fucking outraged at our gov't.
          They will not get re-elected.

          Except that there's no alternative to the ruling party -- their runner-ups (30% vote) are religious national socialists (extreme right wing, conspiracy theory "germans, russians, jews and europeans try to get us!", religious fundamentalists, corrupt, economical ideas same as Orban in Hungary), and some populist far-left.
          So sadly we can't punish them at the voting booth.

  • by o'reor (581921) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:11PM (#38831159) Journal
    According to this article (in french) [numerama.com], the Member of the European Parliament in charge of the ratification process of ACTA, Mr Kader Arif, just resigned his position, saying that the whole process is just an anti-democratic farce.
  • Why? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:16PM (#38831231)

    I'll have to admit, I'm having trouble understanding why so many nations want to sign this monstrosity. Why the US wants it globally accepted is obvious, we don't really manufacturer what we used to. A significant portion of our economy has moved to a creating ideas, instead of things, then selling those ideas at massively inflated prices. But why other nations would fight so hard to get this kind of thing implemented in their own countries, which won't benefit them, but in fact will likely be a determent to them, such treaties/legislation. Is there massive amounts of money paying off foreign politicians behind the scenes that I'm not seeing.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Issarlk (1429361)
      > I'll have to admit, I'm having trouble understanding why so many nations...
      Not nations, people
      > ...why...
      Money.
    • The US makes sure that these other countries know it's "in their best interest" to go along with it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      As wikileaks has shown, the USA government is the one forcing them to sign. And they only need to force a handful of countries. Funny part is, they actually need this.
      As said above, USA's economy is now creating ideas, no, don't confuse that with research, but ideas, which can be patented and sued over.

      Problem is, while the world is forced to play by their rules, the Chinese on the other hand will have no problem ignoring them. So we'll have to buy from the Chinese everything we need, because our companies

    • by jamstar7 (694492)

      Why the US wants it globally accepted is obvious, we don't really manufacturer what we used to. A significant portion of our economy has moved to a creating ideas, instead of things, then selling those ideas at massively inflated prices.

      What ideas? Most of the good ones are already created. Every Hollyweird movie these days is either a sequel or a remake or a rehash of something they made money on before. And it's awfully hard to be creative when you're working 60+ hours a week to make the payments on th

    • It is simple (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It can be used as a form of population control.

      Like someone else already pointed out here, in Russia, if you are anti-Putin, you are claimed to be against copyright and your computers will be seized.

      The same things will take place elsewhere, too.

      All these, ACTA, SOPA, PIPA, whatever, they aim for only one purpose: cement the current ruling class and elite into place. This is done by getting tools with which to fight any incumbents.

      Currently the tools must be hidden with "helps copyright", "thinks of childre

    • by Lazy Jones (8403)

      why so many nations want to sign this monstrosity

      They don't. It's some worthless f.cks who apparently repesent these countries and signed ACTA, I live in Austria and I don't even know the name of the creep who signed on behalf of this country. At its core, the EU is a rotten oligarchy where many decisions are made contrary to the will of the citizens. Other such examples are the SWIFT and passenger data sharing agreements.

    • "I'm having trouble understanding why so many nations want to sign this monstrosity"

      So would I... if it were nations the ones signing it.

      But they aren't.

      Where's the ACTA text, to start with? Did you see it? You are being abused by "the old paradigm": your brain still see the world in a certain form that is no more true.

      What do you think that thingie "globalization" really means? I know this will sound like old fashioned marxism, but heck, it's the truth despite Marx, Adam Smith or whoever: globalization

    • by master_p (608214)

      The ramifications of not signing would be extremely hard.

      For example, one thing to do would be to downgrade the credit rating of said country, raising its spread and interest rate. Remember, the companies that do the rating are all US companies. Then governments would be unable to borrow money from foreign and domestic banks, leading to a catastrophic economic spiral in said countries.

      This would be like a death sentence for politicians, because they will be associated with the catastrophy, and they would no

  • by Anonymous Coward

    It seems that the Dutch ambassador did not receive the required mandate in time. It is the intention of the Dutch to sign.

  • Do you hear that? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Sponge Bath (413667) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:31PM (#38831413)

    That is the sound of inevitability... It is the sound of corporate rule.

    Ha ha, just kidding. I'm sure the EP will fight for the rights of its people. :-D

  • I was looking for a particularly good piece on the ACTA entitled "How the ACTA kills your job" (in quotes search). The page(s) does not exist according to google or the site(s) is down. Also the media seems to think that this is a copyright/Internet related issues only (with Anonymous playing a big role???). Is there a good piece that describes how it would affect other aspects of our life in the media such as generic drugs, seeds, patents and even surveillance by ISPs and file sharing?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Try the search with "how acta kills your job"; it returns a slew of pages, such asHow ACTA Kills Your Job [qummunismus.at].

  • by bughunter (10093) <<ten.knilhtrae> <ta> <retnuhgub>> on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:44PM (#38831603) Journal

    Since it's a treaty, like NAFTA, it's far easier to implement, far harder to challenge in court, and more powerful than an act of Congress. And it's global.

    ACTA vs. SOPA: Five Reasons ACTA is Scarier Threat to Internet Freedom [ibtimes.com] from the International Business Times:

    The SOPA bill was derailed because it required both houses of the U.S. Congress to pass it, and for President Barack Obama to sign it. Once approved, it would have been subject to challenge and could have been changed by future congresses.

    ACTA, on the other hand, was already signed by the United States on Oct. 11, 2011, and Obama was not required to get the approval of any outside authority to do so: not the Congress, not the Supreme Court, and not the American public.

    Now that it has been signed, the legislative and judicial branches of the U.S. government also have little ability to challenge or amend the treaty, and Americans would be subject to a whole new scheme of laws, restrictions and regulations that could have them facing fines or jail through a process that would likely exist entirely outside the scope of the American justice system.

    • by 0123456 (636235) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @02:50PM (#38831691)

      You seem to have missed the part where the Senate has to vote to accept any treaty. Clinton signed Kyoto, but the Senate unanimously rejected it anyway.

      • by rhook (943951)

        You seem to have missed the part where the Senate has to vote to accept any treaty. Clinton signed Kyoto, but the Senate unanimously rejected it anyway.

        Except he may have signed it as an executive agreement and not as a treaty.

        http://www.webpronews.com/president-obama-doesnt-support-sopa-but-signs-acta-2012-01 [webpronews.com]

        There are many issues involved with President Obama’s signing of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — which occurred in September 2011 — and whether or not it should be treated as an executive agreement or an actual treaty between the agreeing countries. With an executive agreement, the President does not require the approval of the Senate, whereas, with a treaty, Senate approval is required. That, however, is not the issue, especially when you consider the initial zeal with which the both houses of the U.S. Government supported SOPA and PIPA.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      That legal analysis is incomplete and misleading. In the United States, laws and treaties get their power based on the Constitution and the number of branches of government that sign off on it. So here they are:

      1. The Constitution is always the top and anything inconsistent with it is void. Only the People have the power to change the Constitution.

      2. Two signatory branches. These are things that have been approved (or in the case of bills overridden of veto power) by two branches usually Laws and Trea

      • Not quite.

        The Senate has the power to approve treaties that the President makes:

        He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur;

        Under long-established judicial precedent, the Supremacy clause is interpreted to mean that the later-in-time treaty or law is the one which is in effect under domestic (United States) law when the two conflict:

        This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursu

      • by bughunter (10093)

        Thank you for the illumination.

        And thank you for demonstrating that Slashdot comments haven't completely deteriorated to 4chan levels of discourse...

  • by Anonymous Coward

    A minister there in Ireland, Sean Sherlock, is attempting to sign a law that will overturn a judgement UPC (non censoring ISP) vs IRMA (Irish RIAA) on favour of UPC.

    http://stopsopaireland.com is the online petition.

    Many Irish sites have once again gone dark/posted banners including boards.ie

    We have been hammering our MEPs with e-mails about ACTA all last week, so I'm very disappointed to hear this news tonight.
    There seems to be a globally co-ordinated simultaneous strike to enshrine IP into law, and to blur

  • by Per Wigren (5315) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @03:42PM (#38832395) Homepage
    Fuck Austria. Fuck Australia. Fuck Belgium. Fuck Bulgaria. Fuck Canada. Fuck the Czech Republic. Fuck Denmark. Fuck Finland. Fuck France. Fuck Greece. Fuck Hungary. Fuck Ireland. Fuck Italy. Fuck Japan. Fuck Latvia. Fuck Lithuania. Fuck Luxemburg. Fuck Malta. Fuck Morocco. Fuck New Zealand. Fuck Poland. Fuck Portugal. Fuck Romania. Fuck Singapore. Fuck Slovenia. Fuck South Korea. Fuck Spain. Fuck Sweden. Fuck the UK. Fuck the USA.
    • Fuck Austria. Fuck Australia. Fuck Belgium. Fuck Bulgaria. Fuck Canada. Fuck the Czech Republic. Fuck Denmark. Fuck Finland. Fuck France. Fuck Greece. Fuck Hungary. Fuck Ireland. Fuck Italy. Fuck Japan. Fuck Latvia. Fuck Lithuania. Fuck Luxemburg. Fuck Malta. Fuck Morocco. Fuck New Zealand. Fuck Poland. Fuck Portugal. Fuck Romania. Fuck Singapore. Fuck Slovenia. Fuck South Korea. Fuck Spain. Fuck Sweden. Fuck the UK. Fuck the USA.

      That's a lot of fucking. I hope you brought enough condoms.

      More seriously, don't confuse the countries for the few dickheads in those countries who are fucking things up. I've been to a good handful-and-some of the 30 countries you've listed, and most of the people I've met have been decent sorts.

      Narrowing the field to just the assholes in charge, the people in these countries responsible for drafting and then signing ACTA generally look a lot like this guy [google.com]. I don't know about your preferences, *I* certa

      • by Per Wigren (5315)

        That's a lot of fucking. I hope you brought enough condoms.

        I'll use the same one over and over, without washing it inbetween.

        More seriously, don't confuse the countries for the few dickheads in those countries who are fucking things up. I've been to a good handful-and-some of the 30 countries you've listed, and most of the people I've met have been decent sorts.

        Yeah, that's kind of implied. I've been to 13 of the listed countries and I can only agree.

        I don't know about your preferences, *I* certainly don't want to fuck 30 different versions of that.

        Can't say that I'll enjoy it to but someone has to do the dirty work. :)

    • by Noughmad (1044096) <miha.cancula@gmail.com> on Thursday January 26, 2012 @04:17PM (#38832817) Homepage

      Fuck Sweden.

      Assange tried, it didn't end too well for him.

  • PETITION EUPARL ! (Score:5, Informative)

    by unity100 (970058) on Thursday January 26, 2012 @03:58PM (#38832559) Homepage Journal

    if you are situated on an eu member country, or, live/work in an eu member country, or, is employed by a company that is registered inside eu, you have the right to petition european parliament. you also have the right if you are citizen of a country that is an official candidate for eu.

    Petition euparl from below link. tell them to fuck this shit :

    https://www.secure.europarl.europa.eu/aboutparliament/en/petition.html [europa.eu]

    this is no joke petition - its official petition form of euparl itself. just drop your real name, address while petitioning.

  • Consider signing the Petition for Obama to Submit ACTA to the Senate for Ratification.

    We can defeat ACTA in the USA in the Senate... If we can get ACTA submitted there.

    Right now ACTA is only signed via Executive Agreement.

    http://wh.gov/KxA [wh.gov]

  • I am disgusted by this. The worst part is that our politicians probably did it out of ignorance.
  • http://www.stopacta.info/ [stopacta.info]

    help stop it if you dare...

  • Apparently not even the EU top ACTA people like the way it has been pushed (or rather shoved): http://falkvinge.net/2012/01/26/eu-acta-chief-resigns-in-disgust-over-disrespect-at-citizens-next-steps/ [falkvinge.net]

  • I keep looking and researching and still have no answers; did/will Norway sign ACTA? There have been no mention of this country anywhere with relation to ACTA, only ever "the EU" and Switzerland when talking about Europe.

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