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The Courts Businesses The Almighty Buck Entertainment

Ticketmaster Customers, Get Ready For Your (Tiny) Class-Action Payout 140

Posted by timothy
from the 16-million-for-the-lawyers dept.
An anonymous reader writes "If you used Ticketmaster's website to buy tickets between October 21, 1999 and October 19, 2011, you're in for a windfall. Well, a $1.50 per ticket order windfall. Because of a proposed class action settlement, Ticketmaster is being forced to credit $1.50 per ticket order (up to 17 orders) to customers because they profited from 'processing fees' without declaring as much. And despite the reparations, Ticketmaster can continue to profit off transactions — they just have to say they're doing so on their website."
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Ticketmaster Customers, Get Ready For Your (Tiny) Class-Action Payout

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 05, 2011 @05:58AM (#38264108)

    Got this mail today. I was about to delete the mail as another spamscam that got through but the text looked like too much hardwork to have gone in for a phishing attempt or a "Nigerian scam". I lived in the USA 10 years ago and may have purchased something from Ticketmaster.

    • by galaad2 (847861) on Monday December 05, 2011 @07:09AM (#38264296) Homepage Journal

      actually, it is a scam imho because you do not get 1.50 in cash but you get it as a discount voucher for the next ticket you buy. Ticketmaster doesn't pay you a single cent in CASH and if you stopped using them you're SOL, you're not going to get anything back. Their lawyers are laughing all the way to the bank.

      Think of this settlement as just a small mandatory promotion for them since you'll be paying them anyway MUCH more than that for a ticket. The $1.50 discount is insignifiant.

      http://consumerist.com/2011/11/you-could-score-150-as-part-of-class-action-suit-against-ticketmaster.html [consumerist.com]

      • by pnewhook (788591) on Monday December 05, 2011 @08:12AM (#38264574)
        This is a complete scam along with most class action lawsuits as the only ones who profit from this are the bloodsucking lawyers!!! Want proof? Ticketmaster is required to pay out $11.25 million in customer refunds, although this could increase based on how many people bother to dig up their tickets from 10 years ago. The two plaintiffs who started this each get 20k. And what do the lawyers get? $16.5 million. Biggest scam on the planet.
        • How many years were the lawyers working, and how much would they have received if they had failed? I see this complaint with every class action, and there is SOME merit to it, but people act like the lawyers should do all their work pro-bono.

          From the article, it appears to be an 8-year lawsuit, which works out to $2mil per lawyer / firm, per year. How many lawyers were involved?

          Its also worth noting that the $20k for the plaintiffs and the 16 mil for attorneys fees look to be separate amounts-- unless I a

          • by SecurityGuy (217807) on Monday December 05, 2011 @10:40AM (#38266342)

            It's ok for lawyers to make a buck, but there's something wrong with the system when the typical result of a class action lawsuit is the people who were actually wronged making a buck LITERALLY while the lawyers, who were not harmed at all, walk off with more money than the average American makes in a lifetime.

            • by Shompol (1690084)

              ... there's something wrong with the system

              yes

              when the typical result of a class action lawsuit is the people who were actually wronged making a buck

              How were they wronged, exactly? That the Ticketmaster website did not state that those $1.50 are "processing fees", among the other legal mambo-jumbo that nobody reads? THIS is the problem, not the layers getting paid.
              Despite the fact that the layers do get an incentive of having this dragged out for years and collecting their lawyer-ly fees; the whole idea of a class action suit that is based NOT on on fraud, but a formality is a load of BS. Another example of someone playing the system.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by Anonymous Coward

            How many years were the lawyers working, and how much would they have received if they had failed? I see this complaint with every class action, and there is SOME merit to it, but people act like the lawyers should do all their work pro-bono.

            No, they shouldn't work pro-bono. But to be fair and consistent with the compensation they worked out for the people actually wronged by this action, the lawyers should have received their millions in the form of a bunch of $1.50 ticketmaster credit vouchers.

          • by s73v3r (963317)

            While the lawyers do deserve a decent return for their work, do they really deserve more than the actual settlement?

          • by WarlockD (623872)
            Your reading the slashdot'ers wrong. Its not that the lawyers didn't get paid for their work, its that it cost SO much and took SO long for essentially nothing. I don't know who the plaintiffs are, but 20k for a few processing fees? Why they get 20k and the rest of us get a damn 1.50 coupon.

            Seriously, why does this take 8 years?
      • by Germ73 (1288776) on Monday December 05, 2011 @08:14AM (#38264590)
        If the payout to consumers is in the form of a voucher, it would only be fair that the the lawyer's fee is paid out in the form of a Ticketmaster voucher also.
      • It's nice to get something back Ticketmaster's been hitting us with fees and monopolizing the industry long enough. About time they have to pay out something even if just a discount coupon nice to see them have feel some kind of pain. Maybe they will open there eyes and stop ripping off the public but I doubt they will.
        • by residieu (577863)

          What pain? It's a coupon. Coupons drive people to buy things. Businesses issue coupons all the time, voluntarily.

          If you were a disgruntled Ticketmaster customer, you're left with a coupon. To make TM pay up on their settlement, you have to buy something from them, handing them considerably more than $1.50 in profit.

          • by jeffmeden (135043)

            But you get the satisfaction of knowing that the first $1.50 of their (now clearly labeled) profit margin is on THEM. That will show em.

            The nice thing is that the settlement will just strengthen the convictions of the Anti-Ticketmaster crowd, and we might see more people calling for real change, not the 6 quarters per ticket this lawsuit netted.

        • by s73v3r (963317)

          No, in fact there was an interview with him last Friday where he said specifically that they don't think they did anything wrong, and will continue operating as they had been.

      • by AJH16 (940784)

        It is worth noting that you can object to the proposed settlement's terms by sending notice of your objection to the lead class council and Ticketmaster's lead council.

        Lead Class Council:
        Robert J Stein III, Esq
        W. Michael Hensley. Esq
        Alvarado Smith, APC
        1 MacArthur Place, Suite 200
        Santa Ana, CA 92707

        Steven P. Blonder, Esq
        Much Shelist Denenberg Ament & Rubenstein, P.C.
        191 North Wacker Dr.
        Suite 1800
        Chicago, IL 60606

        Ticketmaster Council:
        Jeff E. Scott, Esq
        Greenberg Traurig, LLP
        2450 Colorado Ave, Suite 400E
        San

        • by AJH16 (940784)

          Oh, I missed that you should also send it to the court itself.

          Case No. BC304565
          Judge Kenneth R. Freeman
          Department 64 of the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles
          111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, California 90012

  • The word master is right there in the name. They really do consider ticket buyers their slaves.

  • I notice (Score:5, Informative)

    by maroberts (15852) on Monday December 05, 2011 @06:12AM (#38264152) Homepage Journal

    ..that the attorneys are going to get substantially more than $1.50 ($16,500,000 shared between them)

    • They did the hard work...

      • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

        They did the hard work..

        The "hard work" was being defrauded by Ticketmaster in the first place. The "hard work" is being the victim.

        When you are getting paid, and paid very well, for your "hard work" it is never as "hard" as being an innocent victim, no matter how small the victimization.

        Let me ask you. You have a choice. You can be ripped off for $1.50 or collect $16million for 8 years of (honestly not that hard) work. I mean, it's not like those lawyers were going down into a coal mine every day or wa

        • by CastrTroy (595695)
          Just because it's not physically hard, doesn't mean that it's not mentally hard. If being a lawyer is so easy, I'm sure a lot more people would be doing it. Oh, that's right, it isn't that easy at all. And they are putting themselves in a big risk. What happens if the lawsuit fails? They end up with nothing. They still have offices to pay for, employees to pay, and many other business related expenses. I'm sure the lawyers put quite a few hours into this case. It's not just a matter of filing a few p
          • by Anonymous Coward

            How about cost-prohibitive? Who has $180,000 to pay for six years of law school? Granted, that's pocket change once you hit $2M/year, but the barrier to entry is high, even for those with great intelligence.

            • They took a gamble with schooling; how many law school grads end up with a much less rewarding job?

            • by sjames (1099)

              Apparently not, They have to manipulate bar exam requirements to limit the numbers and competition has yet to drive prices down.

          • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

            If being a lawyer is so easy, I'm sure a lot more people would be doing it.

            More people are doing it. The thing that stops most people from becoming lawyers is the price of joining the club. The intellectual challenge is way over-rated.

            Over the years I've had more than one student that couldn't hack an English Lit program who went on to become lawyers, and at least one of them is a very successful lawyer, as he likes to remind everyone at the monthly poker games.

            • by CastrTroy (595695)
              I would say that in your friends case it was more a situation of "didn't care about english lit" that caused him to not be able to hack it in english lit. Also, these are 2 completely different fields. No being able to succeed in english lit says nothing about the skills need for being a lawyer. So I'm guessing it was either lack of interest/motivation, or a different set of strengths that allowed this to happen. I went to school for engineering, and I saw a lot of this. Many people dropped out, not be
        • What sort of argument is that? If the lawyers hadn't run the case, no one would have got anything. This case didn't magically happen.

          Oh, and you are more than welcome to opt out of the class and bring your own case against Ticket Master.

          • Re:I notice (Score:5, Insightful)

            by KernelMuncher (989766) on Monday December 05, 2011 @09:06AM (#38265028)
            "If the lawyers hadn't run the case, no one would have got anything. "

            No one did get anything.

            Except for the lawyers.
          • by jeffmeden (135043)

            What sort of argument is that? If the lawyers hadn't run the case, no one would have got anything. This case didn't magically happen.

            Oh, and you are more than welcome to opt out of the class and bring your own case against Ticket Master.

            It's the same argument as "Why, the fella who won the state lotto last week just paid for a ticket and ended up with ten million bucks, if any of you wants to become a millionaire obviously the thing standing in your way is buying a ticket"

            The legal profession is so wrought with uncertainty that I have absolutely no envy for those just starting out. Sure, there are *good* lawyers who get *very* well paid for their work, but by and large most (even good) lawyers make jack crap and put in 80+ hour weeks for

        • Then go and pay for Georgetown Law schooling for several years, pass the bar exam, and become a lawyer. Easy-peasy, right? If so, I wish you a successful practice and much success; good luck with that.

        • It was easy :-) All I had to do was buy a ticket from a venue that's using TicketMaster as its only ticket sales channel. There wasn't any way to buy my ticket without TM's fees, and there wasn't any way to buy it without paying $8-10 for parking even though I wasn't driving there. (I live about a mile from a venue that's usually a bad traffic jam for concerts, and I'd much rather bike there, not get stuck in traffic, and not need to worry about my substance consumption during the concert :-) Also, one

        • by s73v3r (963317)

          What? Are you trying to say that there isn't any work involved in administering a major class action lawsuit?

          Furthermore, what "hard work" did it take to be charged a $1.50 processing fee?

          • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

            What? Are you trying to say that there isn't any work involved in administering a major class action lawsuit?

            No, I'm saying that there isn't any hard work involved in administering a major class action lawsuit.

            • by s73v3r (963317)

              And how can you say that? Have you actually done it? Or are you taking the position that "I don't like it, therefore it can't be hard work?"

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The attorneys should be sued for malpractice. They should've launched an antitrust suit against Ticketmaster instead.

      Nobody cares about these complicated $1.50 vouchers when the service charges are $8 and up for a simple online transaction.

    • and asking for a fee which will be a around 20% of the settlement. While the number is very large I doubt you or I or much of anyone on this site knows the true costs involved in running a major law firm and maintaining a case over eight years.

      So while it is simple to demagogue someone/something/etc because we don't understand it still does not make it right, let alone worthy of being rated insightful on this site. We should not give into our ignorance, let alone jealously, of others simply because of a dol

      • by jeffmeden (135043)

        and asking for a fee which will be a around 20% of the settlement. While the number is very large I doubt you or I or much of anyone on this site knows the true costs involved in running a major law firm and maintaining a case over eight years.

        So while it is simple to demagogue someone/something/etc because we don't understand it still does not make it right, let alone worthy of being rated insightful on this site. We should not give into our ignorance, let alone jealously, of others simply because of a dollar amount. It cheapen us and the very work we do. I am quite certain you can find any number of people on the street who would be aghast at how much "some" people get paid to work on computers and that attitude has the same founding.

        You are so right, I did an informal poll just last weekend:
        Who would you, John Q Public, be more sympathetic to?
        a) Someone whose sole job it is to operate a computer for the purpose of creating and maintaining communication services to every aspect of life around the globe.
        b) Someone whose sole job it is to go into an already overloaded court of law, and plead on the behalf of "victims" who were the target of illegal business practices and spend 8 years crafting a settlem

  • I've used ticketmaster for events in the UK and Australia. Do I get anything? Or is it just the USA?
    • Re:USA only? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Gib7 (2445652) on Monday December 05, 2011 @06:23AM (#38264172)
      Ah, I found the answer, and it's "You must also have been a resident of the United States at the time of your purchase". And the $1.50 is only credit on their site! You don't even get a cheque for the money. Ridiculous. I hope the lawyers who agreed to this also get their payment in ticketmaster credit only.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Plus you can only use the $1.50 credit vouchers two at a time, saving you a maximum of $3 off the extortionate price of a ticket. Seriously, does anyone apart for the lawyers in a class action suit walk away with fistfuls of cold hard cash? Offer to pay the lawyers in $3-off-your-next-purchase credit notes and see whether they go for it...

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        In other news Ticket Master processing fees (now fully declared in the T&Cs that no one reads) have gone up by $1.50.

  • by Mononoke (88668)
    ...where a commercial enterprise has to DECLARE that they operate with the intent to make a profit.

    No wonder our financial system is nearly in ruins.
    • Just about exactly what I was going to post.

      Seriously, what did people think ticketmaster's business model was?

      • by Man Eating Duck (534479) on Monday December 05, 2011 @11:16AM (#38266844)

        Just about exactly what I was going to post.

        Seriously, what did people think ticketmaster's business model was?

        You would think that it is to provide an optional sales service for convenience that people would choose to pay for, and you'd be wrong. While the email option is convenient, it turns out that they demand exclusive deals with venues, so that you have to pay their "ticket fee" when buying at the door as well. Mind you, ticketmaster has *nothing* to do with door sales except for receiving their racket money (source: a good buddy works at one of these venues), and you don't even get a ticket. Venues still announce cover charge without the fees.

        As I see it, if there's no way you can avoid paying the fee even at the doors it's hard to claim that they're tied up to a cost for a service. When I get a goddamn rubber stamp at the entrance in exchange for cash, I don't expect to have to pay a fee to some third party. Ticketmaster don't even do anything to inhibit illegal ticket scalping - which would have been a nice service, and real added value for all concertgoers. If they did I'd be less annoyed with paying their fee.

        • by Matheus (586080)

          There's a few things y'all are not getting here on both sides of the issue:

          As far as the venues: Ticketmaster created the ticketing systems that those venues use. The small surcharge you pay at the window reflects that. In most (not all but most) cases the tickets are cheaper at the window and don't show the TM fees.

          As far as what the case was about: Ticketmaster adds all sorts of fees to the end of a ticket purchase. They are all itemized kind of like your phone bill and similar to your phone bill they

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday December 05, 2011 @06:50AM (#38264236) Journal
      It probably doesn't serve your sense of victimhood as well; but if you take a look at the complaint [ticketfeelitigation.com] you'll notice that something rather different is the case:

      Specifically, TicketMaster (falsely) declared that a given charge covered the cost of a specific processing option, when in fact it was simply added to improve the margin on the transaction. Making false claims about goods or services involved in a transaction is, y'know, "fraud"(which, incidentally, is in large part why our financial system is in ruins)... Had they simply not engaged in fraud, and not misrepresented the nature of the fee, they would have been free and clear...
      • by jamesh (87723) on Monday December 05, 2011 @06:57AM (#38264254)

        I just checked a recent ticket and it does indeed declare that charge correctly now. The 4 items mentioned are:

        1. Cost of performance
        2. Cost of venue
        3. <illegible smudge>
        4. Profit!

        • Yeah. I don't know exactly when they changed the language(probably not long after the filing, if not before); but apparently the previous wording asserted that various charges were actually correlated with various costs(notably 3rd party ones, like a UPS shipping upgrade or a venue charge), rather than just being a somewhat curious itemization of "Because we can".

          If memory serves, there was a similar suit against one or more of the big telcos a while back, the telco had been padding bills with fees name
      • I thought everyone just assumed that all of the items in the breakdown were Ticketmaster's "Because We Can" fees?

  • It get's better.... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Lumpy (12016) on Monday December 05, 2011 @06:34AM (#38264200) Homepage

    They also are allowed to force that fee (Now $2.50) even if you buy the tickets at the venue.

    It's why I dont go to see shows anymore. Horribly overpriced, everyone has to get an additional profit fee in there, and you end up with crap seats unless you pay 4 figures.

    Screw it, it's not worth it anymore. And from the performance of the band at the last 3 concerts I was at, they suck live anyways. Beastie Boys utterly stunk live.

    • Fortunately concerts in Europe are still (relatively) affordable I remember going to Rock Im Park in Germany and got a 3 day ticket for 150 euro, including camping, for some really big bands. Just seeing one of those bands in the states would probably set you back almost that much..... and of course now I live in Japan where it's even worse than the states, a 2 day festival roughly akin to Rock Im Park costs over 3x as much and doesn't include camping.....
    • by ojintoad (1310811)
      Ticket Fly is an up and coming competitor [crunchbase.com]
      Ticket Alternative has been around for almost a decade. [atdc.org]

      If you don't like one Ticket Processor's practices, okay. Then don't go to shows at venues that use that Ticket Processor. Capitalism might be able to fix this yet.

      For what it's worth, I have gone to countless shows w/o paying a dime to Ticket Master. That doesn't mean I don't pay fees, but the ones I pay are a lot more reasonable ($10 plus fees with Ticket Master vs $3-5 fees elsewhere). And the option of

    • Don't go to seated shows. If it's not general admission, it's not worth going to.

    • by Ichijo (607641)

      It's why I dont go to see shows anymore. Horribly overpriced...

      Are they? You'll know they tickets are overpriced if the event doesn't get close to selling out. If it sells out, then the tickets might actually have been too cheap--"below the going rate determined by supply and demand." [wikipedia.org]

    • by Myopic (18616) *

      I've upped my concert standards, so up yours. There is plenty of good music to be heard for short money: if you care, seek it out; if not, that's fine, just skip it. But don't justify your rejection of all musical shows under the banner that the very very highest end shows are overpriced.

  • We at Ticketmaster would like to remind everyone, during this difficult time, that the reason that their payout is so tiny and late is not that the penalties for audacious fraud on a grand scale are pitifully small; but that trial lawyers are evil and greedy.

    Had we embraced the glorious truths of tort reform, you could have been spared having to receive such an insultingly small offer at all, and we could have gotten away with the entire thing.
  • "And despite the reparations, Ticketmaster can continue to profit off transactions — they just have to say they're doing so on their website."

    No, really? A private enterprise is allowed to profit off its business provided it does so in a manner that is not fraudulent? Shocking!

    • by Hadlock (143607) on Monday December 05, 2011 @07:15AM (#38264316) Homepage Journal

      Well the problem with this "$1.50 refund" is that it's actually $1.50 off your next purchase with ticketmaster".

      Read them email to the end. I got this email a few days ago, and as far as I can tell this is legalized highway robbery. For the low, low price of $16.5 million to the lawyers who took up the cause, Ticketmaster gets free publicity and additional repeat customers, while not having to pay their customers anything. There is so absolutely little for the average customer to have gained from this, there might have not even been a lawsuit to begin with.

      These sorts of cases where the lawyers representing the public are well compensated need to require that a cash payment be put in to a fund to be claimed against. Reading that email from Ticketmaster was a waste of my time.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Same here. I'm 41 and back in my concert going days I saw Eric Clapton, The Who, Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top all for $30 each. My adult daughter was out in California and wanted to go to a Janet Jackson concert but doesn't have a credit card. She sent me a check and I bought the tickets from you know who. Never again. I can't understand why concerts haven't been killed off by this crap. I can't imagine paying $200 to see a live performance that sounds half as good as the CD. And the worst part is knowi

        • I can't understand why concerts haven't been killed off by this crap.

          I'm sure they'll find some way to blame it on file sharers.

        • by Pope (17780)

          Try seeing The Who or Clapton for $30 these days.

      • by V!NCENT (1105021)

        What is justice? They charged you more for processing fees in order to profit from the sales. Now their customers can get their ticket service free of charge for the amount of times they got screwed, they no get it gratis and TicketMaster loses some amount of money. This nullifies their illegal profit.

        This is a punishment for TicketMaster, not a "cash please" thing. Be lucky that the system doesn't always charge insane fees in the millions for a small processing fee. $1.50 USD is seriously not a massive amo

        • by Anonymous Coward

          $1.50 USD is seriously not a massive amount of money and in this capitalistic world; you could have always bought them somewhere else.

          This is the real problem though. In MOST cases, you cannot "just buy them somewhere else". Ticketmaster has a virtual monopoly on ticket sales for most major venues. You cannot buy tickets any other way, including directly from the venue box office. This forces consumers to pay their exorbitant prices & fees, regardless of how many they tack on. The only real other option is just to not go see the show.

        • by mwvdlee (775178) on Monday December 05, 2011 @09:28AM (#38265346) Homepage

          This is a punishment for TicketMaster, not a "cash please" thing. Be lucky that the system doesn't always charge insane fees in the millions for a small processing fee. $1.50 USD is seriously not a massive amount of money and in this capitalistic world; you could have always bought them somewhere else.

          This is not a punishment.
          People now have the choice to (A) not get the refund or (B) pay TicketMaster to get the refund.
          Unless you consider "slightly less profit on customers you might have otherwise lost" as punishment.

      • by gutnor (872759)
        You are hard against the lawyers, they managed to get ticketmaster to remove the usual "this offer cannot be combined with any other offer". /sarcasm
      • There is so absolutely little for the average customer to have gained from this

        That's true. But to be fair, compare it to how much they were skimming off of each "transaction fee".

    • Except if I did it it would be called scalping, and supposedly morally questionable.
  • And despite the reparations, Ticketmaster can continue to profit off transactions â" they just have to say they're doing so on their website.

    That's all we can really ask for, besides actually getting back the ill-gotten gains, and having any unclaimed ill-gotten gains reclaimed and put to some good use, which I note hasn't happened. (Operational costs would take care of making it costly as opposed to simply unprofitable.)

  • I received the email regarding this class action and, well, it's stupid. people knew how much they paid and what they were paying for and agreed to it. this whole thing is unnecessary.
    • by berashith (222128)

      no one really agrees to it. You either do it, or dont get the tickets. There are many other fees already stacked on, and if there was a $1.50 fee for service , plus a $1.50 fee for tickets, plus a $1.50 fee for using the web site, plus a $1.50 fee for picking up the tickets, eventually people would notice, so they buried one of them without telling anyone that they were paying fluff. I havent used ticketmaster in a long time because of this... when the face value is half the cost, something is wrong. I call

    • by xaxa (988988)

      I received the email regarding this class action and, well, it's stupid. people knew how much they paid and what they were paying for and agreed to it. this whole thing is unnecessary.

      From my perspective, it's dishonest when a ticket prices is advertised as £25, but there are so many fees that to actually get a ticket you end up paying £32.50.

      Ticketmaster pay the venue for an exclusivity deal, which means the only option is to buy tickets from Ticketmaster, or the venue itself (which is often very impractical, or almost impossible). The fees make no sense -- buying four tickets often means paying four postage fees, four service fees and four booking fees.

      Here's [guardian.co.uk] an article in

      • by residieu (577863)
        Is issuing tickets such a complicated business that these venues couldn't do it themselves? I'm sure some of these are owned by fair-sized companies that could afford to invest in their own ticket-sales infrastructure and keep the margin that TM's been collecting.
      • by Pope (17780)

        One thing that Ticketmaster started doing a year or two ago was disclosing each additional fee/charge on their tickets, showing clearly which were theirs and which were the venues. The venues freaked out. However, the transparency was enlightening: of those 7.50 in extra charges, 2 might be Ticketmasters' and the rest extra fees added by the venue, who are *already* getting paid for hosting the show in the first place!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I lived in Orlando, Florida about the time the Orlando Magic were becoming the next big thing. Ticketmaster was in charge of ticketing at the "O-rena". Funny thing is, the city of Orlando passed an ordinance that individuals selling tickets and charging more than $1 over face value could be arrested for scalping. Ticketmaster however could charge their "convenience fee" without any fear of retribution.

  • With all that money at least 11 tickets I'll be able to buy 1 concert beer :-)
  • by cvtan (752695) on Monday December 05, 2011 @08:18AM (#38264604)
    There was a recent class action settlement against eBay which I accidentally was a part of. I received a check for $1.63. $1.63!! You Ticketmaster users only got $1.50. Eat my dust!
    • by tipo159 (1151047)
      My eBay check was $0.79. I guess that I need to do more transactions on eBay so next time there is a class action settlement, I'll get more a bigger payout!
      • by hob42 (41735)

        Both of those are better than what I got. My check from the eBay settlement was a whopping $0.02.

  • They are amateurs compared to the real evil - Stubhub. Bribing legislators to repeal anti-scalping laws etc. Owned by eBay.
    • Scalping is only illegal based on a technicality.

      Tickets are a "right to rent a space" - so the customer doesn't own a ticket -- the ticket represents a "rental."

      If we follow the LAWS of this nation; "The Consumer is Sovereign." Meaning; I can buy a car and sell it, and I can run it off a cliff if it doesn't damage someone else's property or cause harm -- it is MY car. Even on that concept, our CorpGov has put limits, because you cannot buy and sell more than a couple cars a year in most states -- obviously

    • by residieu (577863)
      What is evil about scalping? Scalping only happens because the tickets are underpriced and therefore scarce. Scalping just moves the prices up to the actual market price.
  • by Vitriol+Angst (458300) on Monday December 05, 2011 @09:25AM (#38265298)

    If it were MERELY a way to get tickets online-- then charging a Buck for the "service" would be fine. But it's really a profit-gobbling obscenity, that creates a monopoly for Ticket prices.

    We even have laws against scalping now -- which wouldn't be necessary if tickets were just SOLD at the gate, or there were enough concerts/large venue performances that scarcity weren't a problem.

    But TicketMaster in essence is a Monopoly on top of local Monopolies. You aren't going to watch a Braves baseball game unless you are at the Braves stadium or their competitors -- this goes the same for watching a concert; reasonably, nobody is going to drive 200 miles to the next concert venue for that particular artist.

    >> So either there will have to be a regulated Limit on prices -- because TicketMaster can fix them, or there has to be no TICKETMASTER at all. The could be sold off to all the local companies that sell tickets as a "clearinghouse" since that's the useful function they serve.

    When most of the profits go to the middleman -- there is ALWAYS a problem in a system.

  • I received the notification and I opted out. Why? Because this does not benefit the customers. It only benefits the lawyers who filed the class action suit. Ultimately it hurts the customer because it will cause TicketMaster et. al. to raise prices.
  • by doug141 (863552) on Monday December 05, 2011 @11:18AM (#38266874)
    I just got a check in the mail for one penny for an ebay motors class action settlement. Printing and mailing the check probably cost a dollar. Reminds me of the time my school sent me a bill (in the mail) for $19 cents.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_on_Strike#Lawsuit [wikipedia.org]
    ... Kyle convinces the world leaders to give Canada a consolation prize of gumballs and Bennigan's coupons. The strike is settled .... Aboutman throws a party to celebrate end of the strike, treating it as a great victory for Canada, but Terrance and Phillip realize that the gumballs and coupons are worth $3,008, whereas Canada lost $10.4 million by striking.
  • I just got a check for some odd EBay related class action. Total reward to me was something like $1.60, but my total disbursement was a whopping $0.08 after I assume "processing and legal fees". Just to be irritating and get my money's worth, I thought I should call up the contact number and ask lots of questions so I get my money's worth from the lawyers.

An inclined plane is a slope up. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"

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