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EU Privacy The Internet

EU Presidency Calls For Massive Internet Filtering, Leaked Document Shows (edri.org) 236

An anonymous reader shares a report: A Council of the European Union document leaked by Statewatch on 30 August reveals that during the summer months, that Estonia (current EU Presidency) has been pushing the other Member States to strengthen indiscriminate internet surveillance, and to follow in the footsteps of China regarding online censorship. Standing firmly behind its belief that filtering the uploads is the way to go, the Presidency has worked hard in order to make the proposal for the new copyright Directive even more harmful than the Commission's original proposal, and pushing it further into the realms of illegality. According to the leaked document, the text suggests two options for each of the two most controversial proposals: the so-called "link tax" or ancillary copyright and the upload filter.

EU Presidency Calls For Massive Internet Filtering, Leaked Document Shows

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  • by alvinrod ( 889928 ) on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @12:51PM (#55148259)
    They're really going to need a filter now or all kinds of people in the EU are going to be reading web comments about what a bunch of wankers these asshats are.
  • New internet (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @12:53PM (#55148275)

    Those of us in the tech sector need to be seriously talking about building a new layer of internet on top of the old one.

    Human expression and dignity is under assault by fascists cloaked in the sheepskin of virtue.

    Google, Facebook, Cloudflare, are now marching lockstep with the oppressive regimes of China and the EU.

    • Re:New internet (Score:5, Insightful)

      by MikeDataLink ( 536925 ) <mike.murraynet@net> on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @01:08PM (#55148355) Homepage Journal

      Those of us in the tech sector need to be seriously talking about building a new layer of internet on top of the old one.

      Agreed. I have been thinking about this for some time. There's got to be some kind of Virtual Internet (maybe based on VPNs) that we can build over the top of the current Internet. One where all traffic is encrypted and the sources are untraceable. Similar to TOR, but without all of the hops.

      • by lgw ( 121541 )

        Any attempt at anonymity is useless "without all the hops". It's the only way to make traffic analysis non-trivial. IMO, Freenet was the right approach - turn everything into a big distributed hash table. No servers to take down, everything encrypted and p2p, assembling encrypted blobs of content into something coherent only happens at the client. Too bad it's so inherently slow it never took off, but "slow" may be the inevitable price if you want untraceable sources and no take-downs.

        Freenet had its ow

        • Any attempt at anonymity is useless "without all the hops". It's the only way to make traffic analysis non-trivial.

          I don't think so. With point-to-multipoint tunnels, the routers in the middle would never know where the traffic inside the tunnels was destined.

          • That doesn't scale. We tried that back in the early days where every host received every frame/packet and decided to open it or ignore it.
            Nor is it secure, because no one cares about the destination, they care about the source. Every router that receives a packet will simply log where it came from. Follow the chain long enough and you get to a host that generated it. Logging will be required. Passing along encrypted data you didn't decrypt and inspect first will be verboten. Install our spyware and ce

          • Until your endpoint is hacked with a zero day exploits. Also sadly, too many websites engage in profound tracking efforts involving tracking cookies, back end shared databases, and commonly sourced websites carrying personal information to be completely sure of privacy.

        • by Kjella ( 173770 )

          IMO, Freenet was the right approach - turn everything into a big distributed hash table. (...) Too bad it's so inherently slow it never took off

          I don't think it was inherent, it was just stupid. I looked into it... wow, it must be 10 years ago or something and it didn't scale because with many nodes and relatively small node sizes to total data it'd almost be an accident if you found what you looked for. Increasing your own node's connections helped massively, which it shouldn't. I was studying the effect of each node not only picking a place in the hash table, but also creating a highly directed network with more slots the closer your hashes. That

      • Sources on the internet are always traceable. That's how packets get delivered to and from their ultimate destination. This is how Ethernet and IP works, Yes, you can encrypt shit, add layers of hosts acting as blind message passers, etc. But then you have to trust your nodes.

      • Try I2P.
    • Those of us in the tech sector need to be seriously talking about building a new layer of internet on top of the old one

      Ah, yes, technical solutions to sociopolitical problems. Those always work really well.

    • Absolutely right. We need to decentralize the Internet. that is the only way to truly preserve it. It got too centralized and Google, Facebook, and possibly cloudflare (dont' know about them, but you could be right), are certainly participating in web censorship/suppression for governments.
  • Pre-Code Internet (Score:4, Interesting)

    by mapkinase ( 958129 ) on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @12:56PM (#55148291) Homepage Journal

    That's what they will call a brief period of 15 years.

    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      That time of culture, freedom and fun.
      When emerging search engines just searched the www and presented results based on the user's search terms.
      The EU now wants political controls, laws and controls.
      A new digital Berlin wall to keep a EU bureaucracy in control of users, comments and news.
      Smart people will work hard to tunnel around all such EU censorship.
      Freedom of speech and freedom after speech will be saved from the EU laws.
  • EU (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Tailhook ( 98486 )

    The EU apologists are downplaying this by pointing out that the current EU president (Estonia) is merely agenda setting and not a powerful executive. People that understand the malice of big government recognize this for what it is; the camel's nose. It will survive the transition to the next unelected EU president, and the one after and so on, until its on the docket in Brussel's various commissions and parliament.

    • Re:EU (Score:5, Informative)

      by AmiMoJo ( 196126 ) <mojo@NOSPAM.world3.net> on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @01:09PM (#55148369) Homepage Journal

      Since the presidency of the EU is not "big government", it's literally just a rotating position that gives countries an opportunity to propose an agenda. Estonia has pissed it's opportunity away by proposing something that seems to violate the human rights of EU citizens (the right to privacy in particular) and which has no hope of ever being adopted or even influencing the legislation.

      Before you complain about the EU, note that it has some of the strongest privacy protections in the world. They have been used to stop government spying, they have been used to force massive multinational companies like Google to respect individual privacy. And those are actual, written and enforced law, not some random proposal that has zero chance of ever being enacted.

      • by ACE209 ( 1067276 )
        Yeah - this proposal won't make it far.
      • While all these are valid points, the fact remains that the EU has a president who is seeking to implement these Chinese-like Internet policies. Regardless of whether the majority of the EU nations agree, regardless of whether there are privacy laws in place, the president of a large group of nations like this can do a LOT of damage, so this proposal of his needs to be nipped in the bud before it takes root and gains traction. Nothing like this every gets implement in a single stage. It's like cancer, if it
      • by mjwx ( 966435 )

        Since the presidency of the EU is not "big government", it's literally just a rotating position that gives countries an opportunity to propose an agenda. Estonia has pissed it's opportunity away by proposing something that seems to violate the human rights of EU citizens (the right to privacy in particular) and which has no hope of ever being adopted or even influencing the legislation.

        Before you complain about the EU, note that it has some of the strongest privacy protections in the world. They have been used to stop government spying, they have been used to force massive multinational companies like Google to respect individual privacy. And those are actual, written and enforced law, not some random proposal that has zero chance of ever being enacted.

        This.

        In a free, democratic parliament you can propose any law you like, no matter how stupid. Proposing a law does not guarantee it'll pass.

    • There is nothing to downplay, this will never get passed. You wanna bet?
    • Re:EU (Score:5, Insightful)

      by barc0001 ( 173002 ) on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @01:19PM (#55148429)

      And the wingnut alarmists think that the next president will bring it in. It still has to go through the Commission, the council and then parliament. Which it won't. Several groups already have this in their crosshairs and are making noise about it. Not to mention ECHR - who literally yesterday gave a ruling that your employer has to notify you of monitoring of your work email - would torpedo it in an instant.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by coastwalker ( 307620 )

      The destruction of the EU is a CIA dream. The EU are the only global political force that actually have any alternative against the American system of Corporate fucking of the population. Enjoy your slavery to corporations who are free to fuck your environment you fool.

  • the Nazis had newspaper censorship and now EU wants that for the net?? what is next???

    • You assume that because the NSA reads everything you ever look at or post that you are any more free. You are a cretin.

      • by Cederic ( 9623 )

        I'm in Europe, I'm pretty certain the NSA get at least as much information about my activities as they do for people in the US.

        What the fuck does that have to do with the EU seeking to extend the mechanisms it uses to control its member countries' citizens?

        My cat just fell asleep in my arms and started quivering in her dreams. She cares more about EU citizen freedom than the autocrats running the EU and she's never even spoken to me about it.

  • Fascism spreads (Score:5, Insightful)

    by evolutionary ( 933064 ) on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @01:06PM (#55148343)
    there is only one reason for using China's system for control data/opinions shows: To guarantee the status quo and minimize or eliminate any threat to your current power structure. Unless the world wants their governments run like China, those that don't like it need to speak up, openly, now....because once it's in, it will be a lot harder to remove. (as per design)
  • Estonia is the only remaining country in Europe where SS (yes, _that_ SS) veterans march on main streets. I guess it's hard to let go of Nazi past.
  • With a population of 1.3 million, it is one of the least-populous member states of the European Union, Eurozone, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), OECD and Schengen Area.

    Why should the rest of the EU even listen to them? 'President of the EU' or not? Also, good luck censoring the rest of the non-EU world.

    Politicians, when will they learn?

  • We could have 1TBs of fiber up to everyone's home and 10GB speeds on phones someday. None of that bandwidth will matter, however, if the only true value of the Internet - the uncensored, uninhibited flow of ALL 0s and 1s - is lost. "We need to be able to regulate what goes across our pipes because of X," in any form for any reason, is ultimately bad for the health of the internet.

    Yeah, we can wrap it up in "national security", "copyright holders protections", "good business sense", etc., but it's all still

  • the Presidency has worked hard in order to make the proposal for the new copyright Directive even more harmful than the Commission's original proposal, and pushing it further into the realms of illegality

    "Illegality" is the wrong word, as these people are writing what will become the law. "Illegitimacy" seems a better word to describe laws decided on behalf of the People but against its will.

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