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Iran Court Summons Mark Zuckerberg For Facebook Privacy Violations 304

Posted by timothy
from the beacon-of-tolerance-and-privacy dept.
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "An Iranian judge has summoned Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg to answer allegations that his company's apps have breached people's privacy, it was reported Tuesday. The court in Fars province ordered that Zuckerberg address unspecified 'violation of privacy' claims made by Iranians over the reach of Facebook-owned apps, ISNA news agency reported. 'Based on the judge's verdict, the Zionist manager of Facebook... should report to the prosecutor's office to defend himself and make compensation for damages,' Rouhollah Momen-Nasab, a senior Iranian Internet security official, told ISNA. Access to social networks, including Twitter and Facebook, are routinely blocked by Iranian authorities, as are other websites considered un-Islamic or detrimental to the regime."
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Iran Court Summons Mark Zuckerberg For Facebook Privacy Violations

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  • by drunkennewfiemidget (712572) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:25AM (#47100153) Homepage

    Somewhere, Mark Zuckerberg is *still* laughing.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by RailGunner (554645) *
      ... until Eric Holder decides to arrest him and extradite him.
    • by sabri (584428) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:34AM (#47100261)

      Somewhere, Mark Zuckerberg is *still* laughing.

      No, somewhere, Facebook is consulting attorneys on how to avoid a Fatwa so he won't end up like Salman Rushdie, or worse, Theo van Gogh [wikipedia.org].

      • How exactly could an attorney help someone avoid a fatwa?

        • How exactly could an attorney help someone avoid a fatwa?

          Not all countries separate church and state. Iranian attorneys (and most mid-east attorneys I'd guess) have to navigate religious law as well as civic law.

        • How exactly could an attorney help someone avoid a fatwa?

          Dress up as Mark Zuckerberg?

          • by Lorens (597774)

            Dress up as Mark Zuckerberg?

            Could be a good idea... but you'd have to find a lawyer with a terminal illness and arrange for payment to the soon-to-be bereaved.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @12:29PM (#47100741)

          Um, some friends of mine got a fatwa from their imam about marriage recommendations last week. The word "fatwa" is the same thing as asking a member of the clergy for written advice.

          Yes, there are problems with Muslim extremists, but I do wish people would stop turning the words "advice" and "school" into things meaning stuff they shouldn't?

          Lets be real here: Iran has its problems, especially with extremists However, the country itself isn't evil, and Iranians in general see through the political BS more than Americans see through the CNN/Fox News/MSNBC charade.

          In the scheme of things, the Iran court is a propaganda item to shore up the hard-liners who run the country. MZ isn't going to Tehran, nor will he be extradited there. If there were an extradition treaty, virtually every US and European citizen would be in deep trouble. The Iranian population knows this charade, and they likely will continue to quietly keep to their VPNs and continue to avoid the morality police/IRG members.

          Again, one needs to separate Iran (the government from the Iranian people.) The people are smart enough not to use a jube as a waterslide.

          • by Jawnn (445279)

            Lets be real here: Iran has its problems, especially with extremists However, the country itself isn't evil, and Iranians in general see through the political BS more than Americans see through the CNN/Fox News/MSNBC charade.

            No shit! Mod parent up, please. Most insightful observation I've seen today.

          • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @01:05PM (#47101103)

            Um, some friends of mine got a fatwa from their imam about marriage recommendations last week.

            I understand what you are trying to explain about fatwas, but that is still very creepy for me, that someone would go for written approval from a religious figure for any important decision in their own lives. If you told me that your friends went to a Catholic priest, a Hindu Holy man, the Dalai Lama or Oprah Winfrey for recommendations, I would make me feel just as creepy.

            Friends of mine are adults, with their own free will, and decided for themselves that they wanted to get married. It was their decision.

            So what do your friends do when the their imam issues a fatwa on how to trim their garden . . . ? Or who to vote for in the next election . . . ? Or that their neighbor is a Zionist . . . ? Do they have free will and responsibility in their lives . . . ?

            I feel that this reliance on religious authority is exactly what eventually leads folks down the path to commit atrocities in the name of religion . . . because, well, it wasn't their decision . . . it was made by a higher authority.

            • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

              by Anonymous Coward

              Friends of mine are adults, with their own free will, and decided for themselves that they wanted to get married. It was their decision.

              Are we to presume you never seek advice or counsel from other people? You must be an idiot to think you know everything and can evaluate every possible nuance.

            • by arth1 (260657)

              I understand what you are trying to explain about fatwas, but that is still very creepy for me, that someone would go for written approval from a religious figure for any important decision in their own lives. If you told me that your friends went to a Catholic priest, a Hindu Holy man, the Dalai Lama or Oprah Winfrey for recommendations, I would make me feel just as creepy.

              Like the president of the United States of America, who solicits written advice from a bishop, an archbishop, a reverend, a most reverend, a sister, an elder and a rabbi?

              Considering he hasn't added any humanists or atheists to his advisory staff, yes, I do find that rather creepy.

              • by nbauman (624611)

                Like the president of the United States of America, who solicits written advice from a bishop, an archbishop, a reverend, a most reverend, a sister, an elder and a rabbi?

                Not President Bush. He gets advice directly from God.

          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by Anonymous Coward

            Agreed. Iran has some pretty intelligent people there, and much of the population is college educated.

            The problem is, after seeing Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Libya, etc., no one is looking to overthrow a government any time soon, but looking instead for slower reforms.

          • by jbolden (176878) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @01:41PM (#47101419) Homepage

            Iranians in general see through the political BS more than Americans see through the CNN/Fox News/MSNBC charade.

            America is vastly more democratic than Iran. The more democratic a government, the less the government can use violence and fear of violence to propagate its will and thus the better the propaganda.

          • Um, some friends of mine got a fatwa from their imam about marriage recommendations last week. The word "fatwa" is the same thing as asking a member of the clergy for written advice.

            That's what I was getting at. A fatwa is not a legal declaration, an attorney has nothing to do with it.

      • by neoform (551705)

        Yes, billionaires are real afraid of Fatwas...

        Zuck could afford to hire a private army to follow him around if he wanted.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <[ten.3dlrow] [ta] [ojom]> on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @12:01PM (#47100509) Homepage

      He's probably just glad that he lives in a country that apparently cares less about privacy than Iran.

      • by mmell (832646) <mike.mell@gmail.com> on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @12:18PM (#47100649)
        No, but I'll bet he's happy to live in a country that has progressed beyond institutionalized racism. I'm pretty sure just being of Jewish descent is enough for a prosecution in Iran.

        "...the Zionist manager of Facebook..."

        I'm guessing the verdict and sentence have already been established. All Iran needs is a victim.

        • by GNious (953874)

          I'm pretty sure just being of Jewish descent is enough for a prosecution in Iran.

          From what a report on Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's ancestry as few years ago, I think that would have impeded his rise to "power" back in 2005.

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          To be fair, the Judge didn't say that. Some IT security guy did. Also, there are 25-35,000 Jews living in Iran, so it definitely isn't enough to get you prosecuted on its own. I'm not saying things are wonderful for them, but despite the harshness of their laws there is procedure and some kind of due process available. Jews do travel there without incident.

          Speaking of racism though, you seem to have some fairly strong and not entirely accurate views about Iran.

        • by gstoddart (321705)

          I'm pretty sure just being of Jewish descent is enough for a prosecution in Iran.

          Hmmm ... do all names ending in 'berg' imply being of Jewish descent?

          I thought that was a myth. Isn't it ultimately Germanic, and 'berg' means "from this city"?

          I neither know nor care about Zuckerberg's religious background, but I've never assumed that 'berg' implied that.

          No more than I assume that names ending in "ski" or "owitz" are anything more than likely Polish or Ukrainian.

          • Isn't it ultimately Germanic, and 'berg' means "from this city"?

            Berg means mountain. I suppose that "Zuckerberg" would be "Mountain of Sugar".

            See: "Mountain of Ice": Iceberg.

          • by jbolden (176878)

            Both Karen Kempner and Edward Zuckerberg are Jewish. They raised Mark Jewish. Mark is religiously an atheist, but he never converted out.

            So yes, the Iranian judge's "let's kill the kike" is at least factually accurate.

          • My completely unresearched guess as to where that myth comes from would be the idea that a large number, if not a large majority, of immigrants to the United States from Germany, Poland, and some other eastern European countries were Jews fleeing the Nazis.
      • I find it strange that Iran is trying to prosecute him for violating the privacy of people in every country OTHER THAN Iran...or, presumably, any other Western Infidel-blocking countries. If facebook is blocked in Iran, why would they give a fuck about it violating someone's privacy? Other than publicity.

    • It's Islam Shariah Law. The rich are always favored over the poor. The publicity from this in Iran is worth every penny of "compensation" (which will indeed be pennies).

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:26AM (#47100165)

    There is no way I see Zuckerberg appearing in an Iranian court anytime soon, regardless of the charges. I personally wouldn't step foot in the country myself, as an atheist, I'd be risking my neck because I'd likely say something stupid and get myself thrown in prison for heresy.

    • by JeffOwl (2858633) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:29AM (#47100199)
      Regardless of my actual ethnicity or religion, if my last name ended in ...berg I wouldn't go anywhere near Iran.
      • by gstoddart (321705) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:34AM (#47100269) Homepage

        Regardless of ... well, pretty much anything, I wouldn't go anywhere near Iran.

        • Which is sad because the country has quite a bit of history, and from everything I've heard the residents are actually a friendly and cordial people -- unless it's a lynch mob whipped up by the propaganda machine :(

          • by gstoddart (321705) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @12:24PM (#47100707) Homepage

            Which is sad because the country has quite a bit of history, and from everything I've heard the residents are actually a friendly and cordial people

            I've known many people over the years who identify themselves as 'Persian'.

            They've been exceedingly nice, smart people for the most part. But, even they try very hard to distance themselves from Iran, the land of the batshit crazy.

            And, I'm sorry, but the present-day country called Iran is no place I'd ever want to go. The historical Persia which had art, and science, and philosophy (and tolerance), and lots of cool things ... that I'd love to see.

            But don't ever forget there's a difference between the historical entity, and the present one. And the present one is ruled by crazy idiots.

            • by TheSync (5291) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @01:28PM (#47101297) Journal

              But, even they try very hard to distance themselves from Iran, the land of the batshit crazy.

              I just met a guy who claimed "Iranian" heritage. His (muslim) family left "Iran" in the 1800's, and moved to Lahore.

              On the other hand, I live in a neighborhood with Jews most of which moved from the Islamic Republic of Iran shortly after they revolution. They call themselves "Persian".

              As per Wikipedia, the term "Eran" is found to refer to Iran in a 3rd-century Sassanid inscription, meaning "Land of the Aryans".

              On the other hand, the country has been known in the West as "Persia" from the Greeks "Persis", meaning land of the Persians. There are Persians in Iran, but not all Iranians are Persians. Some Iranians are Lurs, Ossetians, Kurds, Pashtuns, Balochs, and Tajiks.

              In 1935, Reza Shah requested that the international community refer to the country as Iran.

              So it is complex...

          • Which is sad because the country has quite a bit of history

            It really is a shame. That part of the world used to be known for arts, sciences, and education. I wish that it were still that way...

            en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achaemenid_Empire

      • Are you kidding? I hear there's some great hiking up along the border.

        ( god damn retards )

        • by Thud457 (234763)
          Beautiful country.
          A shame about the government.

          Wait, who were we talking about again?
      • Regardless of my actual ethnicity or religion, if my last name ended in ...berg I wouldn't go anywhere near Iran.

        The Iranians have problems with German names?

        Hint: "berg" is German for "hill" (as opposed to "burg" which is German for "city"). Any association you might have between Judaism and "berg" is really an association between Germans and "berg".

      • Regardless of my actual ethnicity or religion, if my last name ended in ...berg I wouldn't go anywhere near Iran.

        "Berg" is a common German family name. Both the Germans and the Iranians are the Aryan race. Thus, the "Berg" families would be closer to the Iranians than most other westerners.

        Note that the nation changed its English name from Persia to Iran at the insistence of Nazi Germany, to identify itself with Aryan pride (before the second world war). The words Aryan and Iran are cognate.

    • by Jason Levine (196982) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:38AM (#47100303)

      Zuckerberg wouldn't even need to say anything. He'd be jailed as an evil Zionist spy or some other nonsense the moment he tried to leave the country. I wouldn't fare any better with the last name Levine. You couldn't pay me enough money to travel to Iran.

  • Go to country where I can get my hand cut off for offending the authorities? No.

  • I'm sure Mr. Zuckerberg is aboard the first American Airlines flight from San Francisco to Tehran.
    Oh wait, no Southwest flight goes to Tehran.

    Surely he's booked on United Airlines. No, wait, they don't fly to Tehran either.

    Looks like NONE of the US carriers go there. Is it because they don't like money? That can't be
    right. Is it because they are shareholder driven and their shareholders are all either dirty jews
    or clean jews or some combination of clean and dirty jews? That seems unlikely.

    OH WAIT, I GO

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:36AM (#47100283)

    Wow, sounds like an emmy award winning south park episode

  • Of Course Zuc wont appear in Iran, the CIA wont let the greatest target fed intel gathering effort in history go down so easy.

    http://www.foxbusiness.com/tec... [foxbusiness.com]

  • by maroberts (15852) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:48AM (#47100403) Homepage Journal

    The USA has on a number of occasions extended its own laws to cover interactions with foreigners over the Internet. You only have to look at a certain naturalised New Zealander who the US have tried to extradite (Mega something or other, wasn't it)

    The European Union isn't perfect either, as this "Right to Be Forgotten" law also seems to want to establish national law when the dealings are with foriegn companies that essentially only have sub-offices over here. In actual fact, the Iranian allegations of "Invasion of privacy" are fairly similar to the European Union position, which is one reason why I hope that the silly ruling is buried in some manner.

    • by cdrudge (68377)

      With Kim Dotcom's/Mega case, the US tried to extradite him and he was detained by New Zealand authorities. It wasn't a covert black ops where he was kidnapped in the darkness of night. New Zealand obviously was working with the US (even if the US was pulling the strings)

      With the EU's law if the company has a nexus somewhere in the EU then the company needs to comply with EU laws.

      The likelihood that the US or just about any other country that Zuch would visit would cooperate in detaining him in any manner is

  • If we send the Beeb's in Zuck's place I think we could make everyone happy. Iran gets a white boy they can prosecute or just hold without cause for a really long time and the US no longer has to put up with his illegal actions or that noise he purports to call music. Considering there's a petition before the White House to have him deported back to the Canada anyway, I vote we offer this as an alternative.
  • by MiniMike (234881) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @11:52AM (#47100447)

    He should say that he'll fly over as soon as they send one of their Iranian stealth fighter jets [slashdot.org] to pick him up.

  • Interesting that none of the comments so far talk about the blatant privacy violations that facebook commits on a regular basis. Even more so, nobody talks about the fact that violating your privacy - or convincing you to willingly give up private information - is the very business model of facebook.

    Say what you want about Iran, but they do have a point here. Will anyone listen to them? Probably not.
    • You're right, when I upload pictures of my drunken escapades to a social networking site to an account tied to my real name, and my real friends and family, I really do expect that they will be held in the strictest confidence.

    • While I have no love for Facebook -or Zuckerberg - and its invasive policies, I have to wonder if Iran has any jurisdiction over Facebook anyway?

      Does Facebook run any servers in Iran? Do they have any offices in Iran? Do they actively seek to bypass attempts by the Iranian government to block its citizens from accessing Facebook? And, if so, do they have any evidence that Zuckerberg himself is behind these heinous "crimes"?

      The very fact that this judge is calling on Zuckerberg himself (and using inciteful l

    • or convincing you to willingly give up private information

      You seem unaware that if you volunteer your private information to the interwebs, it becomes public.

      IOW, if you don't like Facebook, don't use it. Noone is making you start a Facebook page (well, I should qualify that: noone has ever tried to force ME to make a Facebook page. Maybe I'm special, and the rest of you lot are held at gunpoint until you have your Facebook page set up).

      • or convincing you to willingly give up private information

        You seem unaware that if you volunteer your private information to the interwebs, it becomes public.

        I am well aware of that. However a large number of facebook users apparently are not.

        IOW, if you don't like Facebook, don't use it.

        And I don't use it.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Interesting that none of the comments so far talk about the blatant privacy violations that facebook commits on a regular basis. Even more so, nobody talks about the fact that violating your privacy - or convincing you to willingly give up private information - is the very business model of facebook.

      That's because everyone here knows that. It's not news.

      Say what you want about Iran, but they do have a point here. Will anyone listen to them? Probably not.

      Well, nobody cares, because everybody knows it's coming apart, take one last look etc etc. I mean, privacy is going away, whether we like it or not. We only have to decide what we're doing about it. Will we decide to live and let live, or continue to go to war with one another over our differences, only now armed with the terrible knowledge of just how many differences we have? Oh sure, we'll learn about similarities too, but for some reason we don't se

  • by Anonymous Meoward (665631) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @12:02PM (#47100521)

    ...they could ask for someone who would show up instead. What's Dennis Rodman up to these days?

  • They have a "Committee for Determining Criminal Web Content"? Really?

    Someone should send them a link to 4Chan and watch the entire committee's heads explode.
  • it should be reiterated that when the government of Iran refers to "zionist" its usually directed toward leaders of israel (who are, admittedly, zionist.) Extending this descriptor to Zuckerberg based solely on his last name feels like the court is making a leap of faith. It wouldnt surprise me if the whole thing is a 'look over there!' maneuver from local courts to deflect criticism of Irans own violations of privacy as they pertain to the internet. Certainly no respectable political or legal figure in
  • by Tokolosh (1256448) on Tuesday May 27, 2014 @01:23PM (#47101253)

    I'm sure the Iranians have observed America's approach to Kim Dotcom with interest.

  • Who's there?

    > Iran

    Iran who?

    > Iran away.

    > Knock knock

    Who's there?

    >Iran

    Iran who?

    >Iran for office but as soon as I got there they locked the door and threw away the key.

"There is nothing new under the sun, but there are lots of old things we don't know yet." -Ambrose Bierce

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