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China Censorship Social Networks

Chinese Man On Trial For Spreading False Rumors Online 53

Posted by Soulskill
from the rumors-on-the-internet-surely-you-jest dept.
hackingbear writes: "Qin Zhihui, a user of the Chinese Twitter-like website Weibo, has confessed in court to spreading false rumors about the Chinese government in the first public trial under a Chinese crackdown on online rumors. China has threatened criminal penalties against anyone who spreads rumors on microblogs that are reposted more than 500 times, or seen by more than 5,000 users. Qin invented a story that the government gave 200m yuan (US$32m) in compensation to the family of a foreign passenger killed in a high-speed train crash in 2011 in order to incite hatred to the government which gave much lower compensation to Chinese nationals. The Chinese government did have policies in the past to give more compensations to foreigners than locals in disasters, though those policies have been phased out in recent years. Online rumours are particularly pervasive in China, where traditional media is heavily regulated by the government and public trust in the media is low."
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Chinese Man On Trial For Spreading False Rumors Online

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  • by Moheeheeko (1682914) on Friday April 11, 2014 @02:57PM (#46728717)
    ...In related news, water is still wet. Back to you in the studio.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      either way, it's not protected by free speech, even in the US.

    • It could be an insight into your own future.
  • actually told the truth once.
  • by grub (11606)

    ... it's kind of like a Chinese Snopes, except you go to jail rather than being unfriended.
  • My penis is 3 feet long.
  • The Chinese government does enough shitty stuff for real.

    • by swaq (989895)
      Perhaps even if it was true the government would still claim it was a lie?
    • by khallow (566160)
      It may not have been a lie. Sometimes people say things that turn out false. When they deliberately say falsehoods, then that's lying. And who knows, this might have actually happened and the guy is telling the truth.
      • by jklovanc (1603149)

        This one is too easy to check. You ask a Chinese victim and a foreign victim how much they got paid. I also noticed that the Guardian piece did not weigh in on whether or not he lied. I would think that the reporter would check something like that.

        • by khallow (566160)

          You ask a Chinese victim and a foreign victim how much they got paid.

          The victims would be dead. You're not going to get very far with that approach. It also probably is illegal for the families of Chinese victims (should you happen to find them somehow) to give you that information. If not, the bureaucracy can always make it illegal whenever they feel like it.

          • by jklovanc (1603149)

            It also probably is illegal for the families of Chinese victims (should you happen to find them somehow) to give you that information.

            Yet more baseless accusations. If you know it is illegal then prove it. Otherwise you are just spreading a rumor.

            If not, the bureaucracy can always make it illegal whenever they feel like it.

            Who cares what they can do. It is what they do is important.

            • by khallow (566160)
              China is a nation of men not laws. Their government can make illegal whatever they feel like. And they're pretty good at hiding whatever they want to hide.

              Who cares what they can do. It is what they do is important.

              Because what they can do is the primary constraint on what they actually do.

  • was a lie?
  • developed by agent Annie Walker.

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