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60 Minutes Dubbed Engines Noise Over Tesla Model S 544

Posted by timothy
from the at-least-they-didn't-detonate-it dept.
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Did you watch the Tesla 60 Minutes segment the other night? If you did, you might have ended up on the floor rolling around laughing like I did. Since when does the Tesla Model S electric car make audible engine noises? Or downshift? Turns out, 60 Minutes dubbed engine noises and a downshift over the Model S running footage. The show claims it was an editing error. Call it what you want, it was absolutely hilarious. A little note to TV producers assigned to cover Tesla Motors in the future: Electric cars don't upshift or downshift." At least they didn't fraudulently blow it up!
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60 Minutes Dubbed Engines Noise Over Tesla Model S

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  • Top Gear was worse. (Score:5, Informative)

    by BasilBrush (643681) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:49AM (#46649255)

    At least they didn't fraudulently claim the battery went flat during a test run.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by NotDrWho (3543773)

      Considering that the report was a complete Elon Musk worshiping puff piece, I doubt Tesla will complain too much. I half expected it to end with Steve Kroft asking for a towel to clean the spooge off his face.

      • by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland AT yahoo DOT com> on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:24AM (#46649597) Homepage Journal

        Have you been in one? Man, they are beautiful, fun as hell to drive, great acceleration.
        I wish I could afford one.
        I didn't see the 60 minutes piece, but I can't think of anything practical to complain about.

        • by glasshole (3569269) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:35AM (#46649739)
          Having driven one extensively, it is kinda fun, but not in the sense that a Porsche Cayman is fun. It goes very fast off the line, but it is hard to hide its rather ample weight. Same deal with the Tesla Roadster too, having owned the chassis mate Lotus Exige for several years, the experiences weren't comparable.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by CaptainLard (1902452)
        Yeah I hate seeing stories of massive success, in progress. If there is anything we don't need right now with all the economic uncertainty and political strife, its a positive story showing that greatness* can still be achieved /snark. Despite conventional wisdom, a story can be complementary and objective at the same time.

        *Yes, turning two "crazy" ideas into $billion companies in 10 years with most of the population doubting, if not openly thwarting you, is a great achievement.
      • by Cytotoxic (245301) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @01:32PM (#46651725)

        It was a complete puff piece, but I did really like one voiceover quote:

        "In the history of space exploration, four entities have sent a capsule into orbit and successfully recovered it. Russia, the United States, China and Elon Musk."

        If I was Elon, I'd have that on a continuous loop somewhere.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Jhon (241832)

      Or fraudulently claim certain documents had been authenticated.

    • by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:02AM (#46649389) Homepage Journal

      At least they didn't fraudulently claim the battery went flat during a test run.

      Can you link to the clip/transcript of the scene where this alleged fraudulent claim occurred? Because I remember watching that episode, and aside from (what I perceived as) the playful "if the battery dies, you'll be doing this" pushing scene toward the end, I don't recall them saying or doing anything that would qualify as fraudulent. The fact that Tesla's lawsuit against the show was settled in a way that still allows the BBC to rebroadcast the episode seems to indicate a lack of fraudulent claims.

      Also, in fairness, there's no denying that a "fuse issue" caused the brakes to fail during the Stig's test run - Even Tesla admits that one.

  • Lies (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nwaack (3482871) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:50AM (#46649267)
    There is no way that was an editing error. Someone had to purposefully add those noises to the footage. Please.
    • Re:Lies (Score:5, Interesting)

      by seinman (463076) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:53AM (#46649297) Homepage Journal
      Every professional editor in the world would add engine noise to a shot of an operating automobile. It's one of those things that you do without even thinking about, because generally you will receive footage (especially if it's b-roll) that has poor audio quality. The editor probably dropped it in like he/she would always do, without stopping to think "hey, that's an electric car, so that silence i'm hearing in the footage SHOULD be there." I would most certainly consider that an editing error.
      • Re:Lies (Score:5, Insightful)

        by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:56AM (#46649335) Homepage Journal

        This.

        Definitely one of those "never attribute to malice that which can be explained by incompetence" situations.

        Editor see car, cars make noise, thus, editor add car noise. No conspiracy necessary.

        • Re:Lies (Score:4, Insightful)

          by camperdave (969942) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:28AM (#46649651) Journal

          This.

          Definitely one of those "never attribute to malice that which can be explained by incompetence" situations.

          Editor see car, cars make noise, thus, editor add car noise. No conspiracy necessary.

          I would hope that an editor for a NEWS SERVICE would have more sense than that. Altering levels, filtering noises, tweaking, balancing yes, but going to a library of sound effects and overlaying foreign audio and sound effects? I would hope they would only do that under orders from above.

          • Re:Lies (Score:4, Insightful)

            by squiggleslash (241428) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:34AM (#46649727) Homepage Journal

            The GP said "editor" but it's likely to be a generic sound guy who works on numerous projects. Never worked in the industry, but based upon simple observation I think they pretty much work from a library of standard sounds that they add to everything by default.

            It's the (computer) mice clicks that always get me. Anyone actually have a mouse that loudly clunks in the way shown on virtually every television show, news show, etc? Even better when the visuals show they're using a laptop's touchpad...

            • by tepples (727027)

              It's the (computer) mice clicks that always get me. Anyone actually have a mouse that loudly clunks in the way shown on virtually every television show, news show, etc?

              Any full-size optical mouse based on microswitches will be fairly loud because the empty space inside the mouse's chassis acts as a resonator. This is true of the HP MODGUO mouse on my work computer, and it's true of the Acer mouse that I use at home to play Cookie Clicker.

          • Re:Lies (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Geoffrey.landis (926948) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:37AM (#46649757) Homepage

            I would hope that an editor for a NEWS SERVICE would have more sense than that.

            You would hope, but you would be disappointed. Ever seen a news report where something blows up? Have you ever, even once, seen that clip shown on TV where the sound comes after the visible explosion?

            • Re:Lies (Score:5, Insightful)

              by AF_Cheddar_Head (1186601) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @11:47AM (#46650585)

              If you are over a couple of hundred feet away from the explosion there will be a difference that you can perceive. You know that sound and light travel at different speeds, right?

              If you want a fun demonstration of this get a day on an EOD range, you see the explosion, then hear the explosion, then feel the blast wave, then feel the ground rumble all with different time lag from the actual explosion. Really cool.

        • Re:Lies (Score:4, Funny)

          by Xenna (37238) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @01:46PM (#46651855)

          Never attribute to incompetence what can be adequately explained by competitivenes:

          The noise you hear is from the Mercedes S-Class driving behind it trying to keep up.

      • Re:Lies (Score:5, Insightful)

        by danheskett (178529) <danheskett@NoSPAm.gmail.com> on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:13AM (#46649505)

        Agreed that this probably common.

        But, the point is, that it's wrong. It's always a fraud on the viewer, even if sometimes it's a small fraud on the viewer. What we are basically saying now is that "it's always a lie, but this time, it's an obvious lie, and so we are sorry".

        The process of dubbing in audio, which we know happens frequently, is the problem. It's always a lie.

        The answer should be "no more lies". In this case, it's always been a pet peeve. The video shows a middle-aged guy accelerating normally down a city street at 20 or 30 mph. The audio is of an engine hitting redline after slipping the clutch.

        • I see no difference between this and a laugh track in a sitcom.

          • by prefect42 (141309)

            Quite, so film in front of a live audience. Red Dwarf is a good example where they switched away from a live audience, and you really notice the damage.

        • Re:Lies (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Rinikusu (28164) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:48AM (#46649891)

          Well, good luck with that. Go shoot a movie and edit it. See how your sound stacks up. You'll find that frequently, it sucks. This is why we have foley, ADR, etc.

          Now, granted, in a so-called news piece, it's much more egregious.

          Guess what? CG is also a fraud on the viewer. Those Channel 5 graphics don't really exist outside of a computer. Your favorite newscaster is wearing makeup. Etc.

        • Re:Lies (Score:5, Interesting)

          by taiwanjohn (103839) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:51AM (#46649927)

          This is just scratching the surface on the kind of deception [youtube.com] that frequently passes for "journalism" in the modern age. With a bit of clever editing, you can make anyone "say" virtually anything you want.

      • by slapout (93640)

        But after the editor did that, shouldn't the reporter who's going to be presenting the final story have watched it to make sure everything was okay?

      • realized it was electric. What sound effect would they use instead? Starship Enterprise sounds or something? It would probably rise to cult classic status.

        Actually, that would be fun. Slashdot should have a competition to decide what an electric car on television should sound like.

      • Re:Lies (Score:5, Interesting)

        by iluvcapra (782887) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @12:13PM (#46650871)

        Every professional editor in the world would add engine noise to a shot of an operating automobile. It's one of those things that you do without even thinking about, because generally you will receive footage (especially if it's b-roll) that has poor audio quality.

        I am a motion picture sound designer, my credits include [imdb.com] Zero Dark Thirty, The Hurt Locker and Men in Black 3.

        I would not add fucking internal combustion engine noise to footage of a Tesla S. I might add something-- an electric motor, or recording of a prius, something designed special; I'd definitely add tire skids and suspension sounds over bumps. But I'd be laughed off the dubbing stage if I added V-8 revs to and electric car.

        Sound design is one of the few aspects of television news where reporters and editors are allowed to straight-up lie, because they have a mentality that all they're required to do is (1) not modify the image, and (2) not say anything false. All other manipulations are considered merely style.

        • Re:Lies (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Cytotoxic (245301) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @01:47PM (#46651867)

          I like this comment. I'm reminded of a recent interview that Neil Degrasse-Tyson did with the director of several big blockbusters. Neil called him out on a shot where there was a big lightning storm on the horizon and the sound of the thunder was coincident with the lightning in the distance. The director laughed and said he originally cut it with the real sound and the long delay was off-putting, despite being accurate. Apparently the accurate sound pulled you right out of the movie (because the delay was like 7-8 seconds).

          Interesting that "real" sometimes doesn't help tell the story, and it can even hinder it.

    • by Sockatume (732728)

      Errors are sometimes purposeful. In this case, probably the editing team were used to dubbing appropriate background noise on footage of cars, because the sound of a distant vehicle would tend to be inaudible.

    • by NotDrWho (3543773)

      Maybe the editor accidentally slipped and hit the "Add Car Engine and Transmission Noises" button by mistake. It could happen!

    • Re:Lies (Score:4, Informative)

      by Sarten-X (1102295) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:57AM (#46649341) Homepage

      "Huh, you can't hear the car in this car clip. That's going to be awkward... I'll just add some stock noises in so it sounds normal."

      -Some lowly editor

      It's easy enough to be an honest mistake by an uninformed individual. Most non-Slashdotters don't know or care about the idiosyncrasies of electric cars.

    • by korbulon (2792438)

      There is no way that was an editing error. Someone had to purposefully add those noises to the footage. Please.

      Reminds me of something from The Last Boyscout: "It was an accident, right? You tripped, slipped on the floor and accidentally stuck your dick in my wife."

  • by Sockatume (732728) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:51AM (#46649275)

    I guess you could say they gave it some axle foley.

  • by Kevoco (64263) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:51AM (#46649279)

    I too noticed it and thought it was odd but rationalized it as being the sound of the vehicle carrying the video camera.

  • by ZorinLynx (31751) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:53AM (#46649287) Homepage

    Smooth, instant acceleration no matter what your current speed. It's mind blowing when you first experience it.

    I don't get how people can "miss" the sound of a regular engine, and having to shift. A good computer analogy would be "missing" having to manually input bootstrap code to get your machine going. Sure, it can be a nice bit of nostalgia, but it's a requirement of antiquated technology that no longer applies in the case of the Model S.

    I so wish I could afford that car. I hope they can get the price of its successor down into the 30s; I will jump on that SO quick.

    • by m.ducharme (1082683) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:24AM (#46649603)

      I love having to manually shift, and the engine revving and all that. It's a lot of fun. I'm sure gonna miss it when I finally can afford my new Tesla. It won't stop me buying one though.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Shifting is fun, and it give a sense of control.

      • by Cytotoxic (245301)

        Shifting is a lot of fun, even in a little economy car. Even more so in a nice sports car.

        Having driven a Tesla Roadster.... the "instant-on" acceleration of the Tesla is even more fun. It makes you giggle like a little kid. The acceleration is so instantaneous that it is startling the first time.

        To go with it there is also a weird bit of instant-off deceleration to contend with as well, at least in the Roadster. Simply lifting your foot results in a fairly hard braking force from the electric engine.

    • by ducomputergeek (595742) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:57AM (#46649999)

      A friend of mine just bought a Tesla. As far as I know it maybe the only one in the St. Louis area. I recently bought a Chevy Volt. We were at an event and the topic came up. One of the people there asked me why I went with the volt. And the answer was fairly simple:

      My wife's commute is 15 miles round trip a day. Maybe 20 if she does some afterwork shopping. So the vast majority of the time it's running on electric. But my Dad lives ~ 70 mile round trip from us. He's older and I'm usually out there once a week to check up on him or help him clean out gutters or whatever needs to be done around his house. I have farms that are 300 mile round trip that need seen after. That is certainly a problem with a Tesla.

      Also my budget for a new car was between $25,000 - $30,000. With lower base price for 2014, tax credits, and GM card earnings the Volt fit in the price range and was a little bit smaller of a car than the Malibu Eco, which meant it fit in the garage better. (I really wish we had a 3 car garage, but...)

      Finally, there are a dozen Chevy and GM dealers around the city. I'm not even sure there is somewhere here that can do work on a Tesla.

  • Because Hollywood. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @09:54AM (#46649305) Homepage Journal

    The editors who put in car-related audio on all manner of film media are morons, plain and simple.

    I mean, these are the same guys that pipe in 'tires screeching on pavement' sounds every time the Duke boys take off, even when they're on gravel or dirt.

    Frankly, I'd be far more surprised if they didn't add a bunch of fake engine noises.

    • They've been adding fake noise for over 50 years. I was just watching the 1958 movie "Touch of Evil" [imdb.com] and noticed when they added tire-squealing noise to a car turning on desert sand/dirt.
    • by Artifakt (700173) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:27AM (#46649633)

      What surprises some people is that 60 minutes has the same dedication to facts and accurate reporting as the Dukes of Hazzard. I've stopped being surprised by that.

    • by Sarten-X (1102295) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:56AM (#46649989) Homepage

      Hi. I'm an audio engineer. I've done several short films, nominated for a few awards. You just called me a moron, because you don't understand what I do.

      Frankly, my dear, nobody gives a damn about what a particular car sounds like in a particular situation except for us nerds. Unless the media piece is explicitly focused on how something sounds, having realistic audio is actually distracting to the audience. There are thousands of little noises that our brains filter out because we don't care about them. Someone walks down an alley in a city at night, and their ears will pick up rustling clothes, a jingling zipper pull, creaking pipes, whistling wind, noisy cars, buzzing fans, someone shouting a block away, et cetera. Of course they'll hear their own footsteps, but that's the only thing they'll notice. A good audio engineer will strip out the soundtrack completely, add a noise floor to match the rest of the production, and dub in footsteps. Leaving in the raw audio will also leave in those background noises, but because the audience hasn't been exposed to them, the background noises stand out more, distracting the viewer from the film's actual subject.

      Having tires squeal on gravel is similar. Rather than background noise, the distracting element is that the sound just isn't what's expected. In an action shot, there usually isn't time to properly establish the scenery.

      Consider a scene where the Dukes are waiting by the side of the road, and leave in a hurry. They hop in their car, step on the gas, and rush off from a standstill. Sure, visually you can see it's a soft shoulder, but audibly, your brain hasn't bothered to think about dirt or gravel noises. The first sound most audiences associate with a fast departure like that is a squealing tire. That's what they expect, so having the more realistic grinding noise will raise a different cue in the audience's mind. They'll wonder briefly why the engine is grinding, and worry whether something bad happened to the General Lee.

      In another scene, the boys have pulled head-in to a parking space. After the iconic hood-slide, they have to back out on the gravel before they can take off. That's a chance for the audio engineer to put in a slow gravel noise, hinting to the audience that they should expect to hear gravel. By the time the car accelerates, the audio scene has been established in the listeners' minds. A fast gravel grind may be acceptable, but the squeal is still less likely to distract.

      The professional audio technique, and similar techniques on the visual medium, are a major reason behind the perceived quality difference between professional films and home movies. Subtle echoes, timing, and the selection of noises all contribute to keeping the audience focused in the direction the director wants. Blame him if something bothers you.

      • I'm an audio engineer. I've done several short films, nominated for a few awards

        Nice to meet you and congratulations.

        Frankly, my dear, nobody gives a damn about what a particular car sounds like in a particular situation except for us nerds.

        Probably true which brings up the question why bother going to the trouble of adding the wrong sound? To bring things back on topic, this isn't a fictional movie like star wars where the fact that there is no sound in space isn't important. This is a news piece or at least purports to be one. Accuracy matters in non-fiction. If you can't record what it does accurately then don't record the audio.

        Unless the media piece is explicitly focused on how something sounds, having realistic audio is actually distracting to the audience,

        Have you actually heard a Telsa in action? It barely makes any noise.

      • by cbhacking (979169)

        Much like 24FPS shooting (and no, HFR doesn't look like a "home movie" to me, it looks like it was done with technology from this century rather than people being too cheap to replace cameras from the 50s), the time for that kind of bullshit has passed. It is passé, it insults the intelligence of the viewers, and if you tell us we're supposed to like it we will cheerfully *and accurately* insult your intelligence too!

        • by Sarten-X (1102295)

          You're not supposed to like it, and you're not supposed to dislike it. You're supposed to not even notice it at all, because the product should perfectly match your expectations. That your expectations are in the minority does not make such efforts "bullshit", and your easily-insulted intelligence does not have any bearing on my own.

          Most folks watch a movie to see an entertaining movie, not to get the perfect auditory experience of a 1967 Chevy rolling over limestone gravel on a clear summer day in Illinois

          • by FlynnMP3 (33498)

            Related to this topic, although I have no desire to question your experience or how you are doing your job, is the question "have you noticed movie audiences get smarter over the years in regards to the movie watching experience, specifically in regards to sound?"

            The easiest visual example of movie audiences getting smarter is wanting better and better special effects. For those times humans are the VFX, the uncanny valley is a known problem - that still today VFX houses have problems overcoming.

            With sound

      • by PRMan (959735)

        Consider a scene where the Dukes are waiting by the side of the road, and leave in a hurry. They hop in their car, step on the gas, and rush off from a standstill. Sure, visually you can see it's a soft shoulder, but audibly, your brain hasn't bothered to think about dirt or gravel noises. The first sound most audiences associate with a fast departure like that is a squealing tire.

        This has actually been pointed out by everyone I know, including my kids. You're the only ones who think that we don't all notice and think it's totally wrong. Hence, you are a moron.

  • by netsavior (627338) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:00AM (#46649369)
    This, combined with something I saw in a parking lot yesterday make me think again about electric cars.
    I saw a guy text-walking in a parking lot, he nearly hit by a prius which was in low speed electric mode. (yeah that is a user problem, but the guy wouldn't have walked in front of a glass-packed V8 mustang.)

    People expect cars to make noise. Television is a decent example since it just happened, but in real life, cars make noise, which warns peds, motorcycles, bicyclists, and other cars that there is 2 tons of metal, plastic, and rubber about to hit them.



    Nearly silent, high performance cars remove one of the basest instinct protections we have against current squids driving fast cars (they are loud, so you know they are doing something stupid even before you see them). I imagine some detroit dinosaur who owns a few dozen politicians could latch on to this and require electrics to make some kind of noise.. which will be pretty funny once the hacker/teenager crowd starts modding them.

    Mine will probably play Yakkety Sax until I get a DMCA takedown notice,
    • Please not Yakkety Sax. "Officer, I was totally justified--he was disturbing the peace!"
    • by zdzichu (100333)

      Old news, http://yro.slashdot.org/story/... [slashdot.org]

    • by Sockatume (732728) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:09AM (#46649461)

      That's actually something that's happening. [wikipedia.org] Apparently it's quite an interesting design challenge: you don't have to make it sound exactly like an automobile, so there's room to produce a "better" sound. One that provides more directional cues, maybe, or carries more consistent information on vehicle speed, or which is subtly distinguishable for each car so that you can better understand a busy street.

    • Even gas cars are pretty quiet. I drive up behind parking lot idiots quite often and they don't hear my Camry till I am within several feet.

      Its a problem for pedestrians and cyclists. We could just let natural selection solve it for us.
      • Even gas cars are pretty quiet. I drive up behind parking lot idiots quite often and they don't hear my Camry till I am within several feet.

        I think that's more a pedestrian-with-their-head-up-their-ass issue, as I've had the same thing happen to me while driving my large, 4x4 pickup.

    • by BonThomme (239873)

      text-walking is an evolutionary dead end

    • by sjbe (173966)

      I saw a guy text-walking in a parking lot, he nearly hit by a prius which was in low speed electric mode.

      And that's the fault of the Prius? Sounds like a guy trying for a Darwin award to me.

      People expect cars to make noise.

      Then they should learn to adjust their expectations instead of demanding noise pollution. (yeah I know they won't) Cars should make less noise, not more.

      Mine will probably play Yakkety Sax until I get a DMCA takedown notice,

      Even though I don't really like the idea of artificial noise, I would fall down laughing the first time I saw that.

    • by Twinbee (767046)
      Thanks but no thanks. The one chance we have to remove noise pollution from our roads, and then we have threats it'll come back. The *invisible* damage to all our minds caused by noise pollution in busy towns and streets is worth FAR more in cost than the cost of a few accidents and even lives. People will adapt - they will learn to look where they're going instead of just blindly texting and paying no attention to the road.

      Also remember that with towns much quieter (due to no ICE noises), we can hear ti
  • by BlackPignouf (1017012) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:00AM (#46649371)

    It's not only for Tesla, and not just on videos either.
    Engines are getting more efficient and quieter every year, and cars are better insulated as well. Customers are disappointed when they spend big bucks on a car only to find out it doesn't sound like a big old sport car.
    The solution? Manufacturers actually add speakers next to the engine, exhaust and inside the car.
    You sometimes get V8 sound out of a V6 car :)

    http://www.caranddriver.com/fe... [caranddriver.com]

    • by Jhon (241832)

      Maybe they could all play "the hamster dance" song as they go down the street? Or maybe loop something from "what the fox says".

      "Da ding ding dinga ding" -- "oh, here comes another Tesla!"

      • Obviously the only reasonable solution is to legally mandate that electric car manufacturers put proximity sensors on all their vehicles, that triggers when a pedestrian is within X feet, and plays "Dixie" on the car horn at about 165 db.

        The mental image of a sleek, shiny new Tesla blasting that cheesy tune as it rolls up to a crosswalk... priceless.

    • by rossdee (243626)

      Even the current generation of F1 cars don't have the noise they used to. People are complaining...

    • by GodfatherofSoul (174979) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:29AM (#46649673)

      They should just play Yakety Sax. That makes *everything* speed up!

  • by slackware 3.6 (2524328) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:04AM (#46649407)
    Cars with CVT don't shift either.
    • Is there a transmission in the Tesla S? I thought it was just a virtue of electric motors that they have high torque at all speeds.

  • Electric trains can make noises which sound a lot like a gear change as they change speed. In reality it is changes to the electric control regime. It's still not reasonable to assume that a Tesla will sound the same though.
  • ... the sound track of a floppy boot for my laptop.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:08AM (#46649453)

    It is 38.6% more likely that puppies will wander into the street in front of a quiet car.

    If it is a Tesla car they could get wedged under the car where they will burst into flames from leaky batteries.

    It is obvious that 60mins was playing this car noise to warn the puppies to get off the road while they were filming for the report.

  • I'm sure this wasn't just one low-level sound editor's fault...but that guy will be working at McDonalds by the end of the week.
  • by cfulton (543949) on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:35AM (#46649735)
    They have lost all credibility in the last year. They are no longer a news outlet but the paid shills of their network an their sponsors.
  • by Andy Dodd (701) <atd7&cornell,edu> on Thursday April 03, 2014 @10:42AM (#46649793) Homepage

    Actually there are valid reasons for an electric vehicle to shift gears - just because many electric vehicles only have one gear doesn't mean there aren't valid reasons for having multiple gear ratios.

    Although in the case of EVs, shifting tends to be more speed-dependent than load-dependent. While EV motors are typically constant-power, there ARE torque limits at low speeds due to current limits. Although this usually means that an EV that has more than one gear ratio needs far fewer than an internal combustion vehicle. (as in, even two gear ratios is usually enough in the rare cases where only one gear ratio wasn't.)

    See Charles Guan's burnoutchibi project as one example.

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