Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Verizon AT&T Communications Government Privacy United States

Verizon and AT&T Join the 'Transparency Report' Club 37

Posted by timothy
from the not-quite-the-same-as-the-invisible-men dept.
wiredmikey writes "Telecommunications giants Verizon and AT&T both announced (separately) this week that they would join a growing list of tech and telecom sector companies in publishing a 'transparency report' about demands for information from law enforcement agencies. Verizon said the first report would come in early 2014, with updates being published semi-annually. AT&T said it would also release a semiannual report starting in early 2014 with information 'to the extent permitted by laws and regulations.' The transparency reports will include things such as the total number of law enforcement agency requests in criminal cases, subpoenas, court orders and warrants. However, telecom and tech firms are still barred from releasing data on national security requests from the FBI and U.S. intelligence services."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Verizon and AT&T Join the 'Transparency Report' Club

Comments Filter:
  • by turkeydance (1266624) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @08:53PM (#45757235)
    kinda/sorta.
    • Yeah. These are the guys who couldn't wait to turn over any data they had to the gov't, in exchange for healthy fee's for the data, and the odd favor like retroactive immunity from doing blatantly illegal things.

      But now that they see more and more people voicing their concern against indiscriminate data capture by the gov't, they finally decide to jump on the freedom bus and say "See, we were with you the whole time."

  • So this is completely worthless, then.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 21, 2013 @09:24PM (#45757351)

      Yup. National Security Letters bar everyone involved from even acknowledging they exist. An order issued by a secret court, without any representation for the accused, that restrain free speech. Nothing unconstitutional about that.

      • Yup. National Security Letters bar everyone involved from even acknowledging they exist. An order issued by a secret court, without any representation for the accused, that restrain free speech. Nothing unconstitutional about that.

        Nope. No court involved, it is issued by a government agency without court oversight.

    • by ThatsMyNick (2004126) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @09:50PM (#45757457)

      It is not worthless. I for one am interested in non-NSA, non-FBI requests too. My local cops probably have more influence on me than the NSA anyways.

      • by Nerdfest (867930)

        Based on the fight that Verizon put up, I'm not sure I'd trust the numbers they provide.

      • by swillden (191260)

        It is not worthless. I for one am interested in non-NSA, non-FBI requests too. My local cops probably have more influence on me than the NSA anyways.

        Also, it's not true that they can't provide information about NSLs. Google negotiated permission to publish ranges of numbers, and with that precedent established it shouldn't be too hard for others to do the same.

  • You don't need to try and get the permission to report how often the government is getting the data. People and companies should be fighting for these activities to be stopped.

  • It used to be cool but now there are so many wiretaps that its become a pain in the ass from an administrative and technical standpoint and a pr nightmare.

  • by the_B0fh (208483) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @10:45PM (#45757635) Homepage
  • However, telecom and tech firms are still barred from releasing data on national security requests from the FBI and U.S. intelligence services."

    How about "leaking it" Snowden style via some "contractor?" Heck, if it hapned to the NSA, it can surely happen to some big corporation. No?

    • by Dorianny (1847922)

      However, telecom and tech firms are still barred from releasing data on national security requests from the FBI and U.S. intelligence services."

      How about "leaking it" Snowden style via some "contractor?" Heck, if it hapned to the NSA, it can surely happen to some big corporation. No?

      Fleeing the country might keep you safe from a government agency but there is nowhere in the world you can hide from a multi-national corporation.

  • How can they expect us to believe this crap?

    Putting the word "transparency" in anything with a telecom bends the needle on my BS meter as it 'helicopters' off into the wild blue yonder.

    Where was all of this 'transparency' stuff prior to Snowden's escapade?

    We need ALL of the PATRIOT Act repealed now!

  • So yer gonna let us know when Sheriff Brown's men come knockin' with bench warrants because Daisie Mae's been kitin' checks around town again. And when Agent Orange and Agent Pink ("pink? Why do I have to be pink??") from the Dee Eee Aye are trollin' emails trying to find Bobby Joe who made it big back East sellin' loco weed to the uptight Beltway folks. And Officer Green from the Eff Bee Eye who is stalkin' 'ol Abdul and thinkin' he is tryin' to build a bomb just 'cause his momma named him after his Arab Daddy and he bought all this extra fertilizer for his farm to share with the Bransons who want to keep farmin' but they're on Social Securitty 'an they can't afford none. Well that's real special.

    Well shucks, why don't you tell us about ROOM 641A [wikipedia.org] and how many like it there are out there. You can Meet Me At Your Telecom Riser [youtube.com] where the fiber optics are split, and show us which circuits have been tapped to give the spooks access to full Internet and full-voice. And show us a map so we can see how domestic it is.

    While you're at it, tell us when this stuff started to be installed too. Because we are coming to believe that the current President is merely a Puppet on a Chain and the spooks have some blackmail on him even worse than the Choom Gang. They say dance, he dances. Knowing when this domestic vacuum cleaner was turned on the citizens of the US would help us to discover who and what policies are responsible for this.

    You're off Scott Free now, AT&T. For awhile you were quakin' in your boots as Hepting vs. AT&T [wikipedia.org] was rising through the courts, "in which the EFF alleges that AT&T permitted and assisted the National Security Agency (NSA) in unlawfully monitoring the communications of the United States, including AT&T customers, businesses and third parties whose communications were routed through AT&T's network, as well as voice over IP telephone calls routed via the Internet."

    But right around the time Hepting vs. AT&T made it to the Ninth Circuit. And wouldn't you know, in July 2008 the Senate (I wonder what Choom Gang blackmail the spooks have on them!) decided it was a great time to pass the FISA Amendments Act [wikipedia.org] which is all about the tappin' of foreigners, all about keepin' the Republic safe, right? Well the Act also granted 'retroactive immunity' to telecomm employees who participate in un-Constitutional surveillance at the request of the government.

    The Senate, and that Ninth Circuit Judge, and the Supreme Court (who refused the appeal) really got your ass out of the fire, AT&T. Because you were losing the case, after all. You were caught red-handed assisting spooks to connect their backbone slurp-taps on the domestic communications links between Americans, and no fancy lawyer could ever argue you did not know what was happening.

    Well too bad that Congress sprinkled 'retroactive immunity' pixie dust on you. Your ultimate embarrassment in losing Hepting vs. AT&T would have been a small price to pay for blowing the lid off this turn-key Police State you are helping to build. Fortunately there are heroes like Snowden who have the balls to do it for you.

    So AT&T, tell us about Room 641A. We don't give a flying fuck about law enforcement warrants.

    And also, please shoot that male voice "I didn't get that. Did you say... my pickle is not working...?" stupid robot who answers for customer support. He's an abomination of microchips.

    Thank you.

    Thar be dragins in our midst. Slay them.
    NSA and the Desolation of Smaug [slashdot.org]

  • Suppose all the telephone companies and ISPs announce clearly the days/weeks/years when they *don't* get NSLs. Would they be breaking the terms of the NSLs then? Or do we know that they all get NSLs, and we just don't know how many, or more importantly, what they say.

I find you lack of faith in the forth dithturbing. - Darse ("Darth") Vader

Working...