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Piracy Education

MPAA Backs Anti-Piracy Curriculum For Elementary School Students 250

Posted by samzenpus
from the think-of-the-children dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A number of groups, including the MPAA, are pushing to educate elementary school kids about the dangers of piracy. From the article: 'A nonprofit group called the Center for Copyright Information, which is supported by the MPAA and other groups, has commissioned a school curriculum to teach elementary-age children about the value of copyrights. The proposed curriculum is still in draft stage, but it's already taking flak. Some critics say the curriculum promotes the biased agenda of Hollywood studios and music labels. Others contend it would use up valuable classroom time when U.S. public schools are already struggling to teach the basics.'"
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MPAA Backs Anti-Piracy Curriculum For Elementary School Students

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  • by ScottCooperDotNet (929575) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:26PM (#45394691)

    The Nazis also pushed for youth indoctrination to attempt to create generations of followers. Glad DARE and MAFIAA learned the lesson.

  • Biased (Score:4, Insightful)

    by neghvar1 (1705616) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:27PM (#45394699)
    Of course we all know this will be biased. Piracy funds terrorism, illegal drugs, crime and violence.
    • Of course we all know this will be biased. Piracy funds terrorism, illegal drugs, crime and violence.

      Have they made any adjustments to the party line to deal with the fact that the economics of buying dodgy DVDs from some bloke down the pub and just torrenting everything are really quite dissimilar (and, indeed, likely direct rivals)?

      It isn't rocket surgery to suspect, or even find the occasional confirmation in stories about some arrest, that people who deal in commodities that command a markup because they incur legal exposure will also deal in illicit media copies, since those are a commodity that co

  • Education? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by IonOtter (629215) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:27PM (#45394703) Homepage

    I respectfully submit a request to change the tag on this story from "education" to "indoctrination".

    • Re:Education? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Nerdfest (867930) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:32PM (#45394747)

      Education would have at least some mention about the public domain and its advantages, and the fact that copyright is a privilege, not a right.

      • Re:Education? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Confusedent (1913038) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:48PM (#45394927)
        Due to funding issues, critical thinking has been cut from the curriculum.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by penix1 (722987)

        Education would have at least some mention about the public domain and its advantages, and the fact that copyright is a privilege, not a right.

        I am probably going to draw flack for this but WTF, here we go...

        Article 1 Section 8 Clause 8 of the US Constitution makes it a right in the US. Besides that, let's play Devil's advocate here for a while:

        Tell me just how an artist or distributor of content is supposed to make a living regardless of the length of time given for the "limited time" as listed in the Cons

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Aaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnddddd, none of this is relevant to letting the MPAA or any other group access to school curriculum.
          If these fuckers can get access, who else already has?

        • by Bert64 (520050)

          Release it when its ready, don't arbitrarily delay the release...
          If the finished code can be made available on a torrent site, then why cant it be made available for purchase?

          And don't be so greedy... The more you try to screw people, the more they will bite back. Stop screwing the public domain, and charge reasonable prices.

          Accept that the very nature of a trivially copied product means that there will always be some who copy it.

          Stop screwing paying customers with "copy protection" schemes, those who want

        • by nospam007 (722110) *

          "Tell me just how an artist or distributor of content is supposed to make a living regardless of the length of time given for the "limited time" as listed in the Constitution? Right now, things are showing up on the illegal sites even before they are officially released by the rightful owner. Just how do you overcome that? "

          The same way a water-seller does it when it begins to rain.
          Trying a new business model, not sending people to jail because they drank out of a puddle.

      • Education would have at least some mention about the public domain and its advantages, and the fact that copyright is a privilege, not a right.

        It would also present the counter arguments and have a discussion of the relative merits of both points of view.

    • by Virtucon (127420)

      'It rubs the lotion on its skin or else it gets the hose again...'

    • by loufoque (1400831)

      What's the difference?
      Or do you refuse to acknowledge the bias in education?

  • Good on them. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by LWATCDR (28044) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:27PM (#45394705) Homepage Journal

    Movie execs need their private jets, blow, and hookers to relax after a hard day of not paying taxes and buying congress people.

  • Remember Kids... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:28PM (#45394707)

    It isn't nice to share your toys, you're stealing money that the toy manufacturers deserve when your friend Johnny doesn't buy his own toy!

    CAPTCHA: Retail

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:30PM (#45394729)

    We don't teach our children to think, we teach them to consume.

    • That's true. We should make sure we teach them the principles of justice, the value of honest labor, and the benefits of arts to culture and society. Then let them make an informed decision.

  • DARE (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Hatta (162192) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:35PM (#45394769) Journal

    This is just like the pharmaceutical industry funding D.A.R.E..

  • ...than they were in the old days [youtube.com].
  • by HeckRuler (1369601) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:41PM (#45394867)

    oh come on! Think of the poor MPAA losing their shirt just because times change. And hey, if schools are having troubles right now, they're sitting on a MOTHERLOAD of a profitable resource: A captive and impressionable audience. I'm sure the MPAA would be willing to part with a few dollars to have a SIMPLE and PRODUCTIVE message sent to our youths.

    And why stop there? I'm sure that ExxonMobile would be willing to donate to our children's future and supply a brief explanation of the benefits of fracking. Halliburton would be able to give an up-close and insightful description of political issues to bolster their social science awareness. Microsoft would be able to explain what all happens when you agree to those complicated EULAs. They could also comment on the importance of sharing, caring, and litigating anyone who dares do it with your toys. Monsanto would do wonders in the biology class.

    Just think of the possibilities [wikipedia.org].

  • You what? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by StoneyMahoney (1488261) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:44PM (#45394893)

    If I'm understanding this correctly, the music labels are now resorting to re-educating future generations in a futile attempt to protect their obsolete business models. Their meddling with the legal system, constant redefinition of copyright terms and heavy-handed persecution of those they see as "offenders" have, as predicted by everyone except them, done nothing to prevent people doing what human beings have loved to do with audible culture for millennia - sharing it. These idiots probably see this as a good idea. What next? Selectively assigning breeding privileges to the population based on an exam paper sponsored by the Corporate Overloads of America to ensure your opinions conform to our scientifically proven CorrectThink(TM)?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      No, you are not understanding this correctly.

      You used the term "re-educating" incorrectly. You imply that people who violate copyright are not actually offenders. And the slippery slope argument about breeding is so ridiculous right now that you deserve to be stripped of your posting rights.

      As you said, people have the natural instinct of sharing things. On a normal basis of friend to friend, this is generally tolerated. Buying one copy and sharing it with everyone on the planet is illegal in pretty muc

      • by hazah (807503)
        All of this presupposes that the contract is valid. Its not. Moreover, we argue that it is unnecessary, and void of benefits to scociety. We are backed by piles of evidence in the form of the record industry middle man bear pig getting filthy rich, and only a handful of untalented performers recieving any significant mention by them -- reality. In short, its a system for the rich to get richer at the expense of our culture... you know whats really not helping? Subscribing to a dysfunctional system, and pro
  • by Joe_Dragon (2206452) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:46PM (#45394913)

    Give Credit," "It's Great to Create,"ECT the RIAA tells the artests that but uses a lot of loop holes and Hollywood book keeping to not pay them.

    • I'd hope the RIAA could find time to explain the economics of the industry. i.e. the chargebacks and other fun instruments used to lessen or entirely remove the need to pay royalties to artists. For additional credit, have the MPAA explain why high grossing films can make a loss because Paramount sent a cut of the revenues to the fucking moon.

  • by flogger (524072) <non@nonegiven> on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:47PM (#45394925) Journal
    I dare the administration to tell me I have to teach this curriculum to my students. I'll give my own slant on it and end up teaching anonymous proxy, torrents, ripping, you name it...

    Actually as common core, students have to work more with media. As a result we are ripping DVDs and cds and editing these to meet some educational goals... I am sure that is against their curricula.
    bastards. (*IAA, not the students, this time.)
    • But do you teach elementary school students? Somehow I doubt elementary school kids are ripping DVDs and CDs and editing them for class. I don't think you're going to get the chance to bollix their indoctrination. At least, not on the first go-round. You'll probably get the chance in a few years, when the first crop of students that has received the indoctrination gets to you. (Does anybody think the MAFIAA won't get this into some school somewhere?)

      Incidentally, your sig isn't rendering right. Looks

    • by mwvdlee (775178) on Monday November 11, 2013 @06:14PM (#45395147) Homepage

      "Following these detailed instructions on how to setup an anonymous proxy and access these warez sites is bad, m'kay".

    • Are your principles worth more to your than your career?

      • Are your principles worth more to your than your career?

        - In reply to "I dare the administration to tell me I have to teach this curriculum to my students. I'll give my own slant on it and end up teaching anonymous proxy, torrents, ripping, you name it..."

        If they really are a teacher - yes (it's part of the job description).

        But there's no need to concentrate on "anonymous proxy, torrents, ripping, you name it...", although they merit discussion - I'd just spend time on the public domain and how copyright can be, has been and is being used to steal from society.

  • by WillyWanker (1502057) on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:50PM (#45394945)

    As long as I can form a coalition that gets equal time promoting piracy and clearly exposes the Hollywood MAFIAA for what it really is I have no problem with this.

    Otherwise it's essentially Nazi-style propaganda, which has no place in our schools. Sorry MAFIAA, but no.

  • Fabulous idea! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by onyxruby (118189) <onyxrubyNO@SPAMcomcast.net> on Monday November 11, 2013 @05:54PM (#45394969)

    Why don't we start with the fact that Hollywood was founded as it was about as far from New York and their IP laws about the movie industry as you could get in those days? Let's make sure we cover the theft of material from the public domain for corporate use too.

    Don't forget to cover the MPAA's own history of corruption. The RIAA should not be forgotten either, they have a long history of ripping of artists and we need to make sure we educate people on that. We should have a special section on Hollywood accounting that covers how you have a billion dollar blockbuster that costs $100 million to make and officially loses money. Make sure that we cover how this works in the music industry too.

    I also think it is important that people are educated on all of their rights that have been trampled and attempted to be circumvented by the **AA's and their like kind organizations overseas. By all means we should show the **AA's support of taking away your rights for a fair trial if your accused of copyright infringement. Don't forget to educate people on treaties and what they have done to take away your rights by treaty.

    Don't forget to cover public domain and the history of extending how long something will last before being put into public domain. We also need to show how this has changed over the years. Libraries, those bastions of piracy! They have the audacity to lend IP without people paying for them fresh every single time, let's make sure we cover the history of trying to shut down libraries abilities to do lend things.

    Anything else that we should educate people on?

    • by Bob9113 (14996)

      Excellent post.

      Anything else that we should educate people on?

      How about offshoring their profits by paying massive "licensing fees" to empty offices in the Barbados so they don't have to chip in their share of taxes to support the economic system they bleed dry? ('course, this hardly sets them apart from any of the Fortune 500)

  • by SolitaryMan (538416) on Monday November 11, 2013 @06:01PM (#45395049) Homepage Journal
    Teach them copyright law and use it as a proof of Intelligent Design.
    • by wjcofkc (964165)
      Teach them copyright law and use it as a proof that god's design has a few bugs in it.
  • ...as it was originally designed (20-30, maybe even 40 years). Not this 110+ the lift of author business.

  • by Carcass666 (539381) on Monday November 11, 2013 @06:09PM (#45395119)

    Religious people can opt-out their children when it comes to evolution and sex-education. Seems only fair that parents get the option to opt their children out of this unabashed intrusion of the classroom by media corporations. From an economic educational standpoint, I don't want my kids learning that having the right political connections can be used to compensate for a broken business model.

  • Great idea (Score:3, Informative)

    by mwvdlee (775178) on Monday November 11, 2013 @06:12PM (#45395129) Homepage

    Great idea... as long as it's objective and based on science.

    You know... explaining how copyright once just lasted only a handfull of years and how downloading movies and music doesn't actually hurt sales.
    Perhaps the kids should also be educated in the danger giving up your privacy to phone-home Digital Restriction Management, how companies steal control over your computer just because you want to play a CD and how they no longer actually own the things they buy in a store.

  • This is blatant indoctrination. China will be jealous.

  • by ChromaticDragon (1034458) on Monday November 11, 2013 @06:19PM (#45395181)

    How in the WORLD is advertising and propaganda being placed directly in public school curriculum?

    I am sure this is not the first time propaganda has been pushed through elementary schools. There are tons of examples in various countries and regimes. And since it's that time of year again, let's tip our hats to the incredibly successful disinformation campaign of the Daughters of the American Revolution in creating our wonderful American Thanksgiving mythology (among many other similar myths).

    Did I miss the nationwide campaign for elementary school level curriculum on the dangers of smoking? I seem to remember that being a part of Health in junior high... where you'd sort of expect it. If this followed that pattern, I'd expect to see this in within a class on Government in High School where patents, trademarks and copyright were debated alongside a treatment of historical patterns of dying industries using laws/regulations to postpone their demise rather than adapting.

  • The student's grade, and the schools' grade are test-based. (The teacher's grade may be too, though that's still a bone of contention.) Until it's on the test (Common Core, in the current instance), where is the incentive to teach it?

  • by Hamsterdan (815291) on Monday November 11, 2013 @07:10PM (#45395571)

    Teach kids how to read and write properly. Teach them to do math without a calculator. Geography, general culture, the works.

    Your / You're
    Would of
    Its / It's

    Heck, it's not even my native langage and it hurts my brain the way people write today...

  • Thou shalt not make non-destructive copies of electrons as they pass over the holy Internet.

  • ...already been done [youtube.com].

    But seriously, how about some equal time? I think one could make the case that in the interest of inclusion, pro-piracy curriculum should be included.

  • if you can buy education today, you get your way tomorrow.

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