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Bitcoin Communications Encryption Government Privacy The Almighty Buck

Dark Wallet Will Make Bitcoin Accessible For All — Except the Feds 206

Posted by timothy
from the why-wouldn't-you-trust-the-feds? dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes "The group, called UnSystem, are self-proclaimed crypto-anarchists led by Cody Wilson—who you may remember as the creator of the controversial 3D-printed gun. After getting himself in hot water with the government for making the digital files to print an unregulated weapon freely available on the internet, Wilson's now endeavoring to bring Bitcoin back to its anarchist roots. Like other Bitcoin wallets, you'll be able to store, send, and receive coins, and interact with block chain, the Bitcoin public ledger. But Dark Wallet will include extra protections to make sure transactions are secure, anonymous, and hard to trace—including a protocol called "trustless mixing" that combines users' coins together before encoding it into the ledger."
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Dark Wallet Will Make Bitcoin Accessible For All — Except the Feds

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  • Deceased owners (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 01, 2013 @10:09PM (#45308117)

    Would someone please explain what happens to BitCoins whose owners die without passing on their wallets to successors? Without the necessary passwords, what happens to the BitCoins? Are they removed from the system?

  • by MRe_nl (306212) on Friday November 01, 2013 @10:28PM (#45308227)

    Cash In Advance.

    Secure, anonymous, and hard to trace - including a protocol called "trustless mixing" that combines users' coins together.

  • Re:Deceased owners (Score:5, Interesting)

    by pla (258480) on Friday November 01, 2013 @10:30PM (#45308239) Journal
    Would someone please explain what happens to BitCoins whose owners die without passing on their wallets to successors? Without the necessary passwords, what happens to the BitCoins? Are they removed from the system?

    At present, every 5-10 years, the Bitcoin protocol will necessarily upgrade its encryption an d hashing routines to keep pace with processor (whether CPU or GPU or "other") speeds.

    Dead people will, of course, not ever transfer their balances to the newest version, and as a result, after 10-20 years, their BTC will become trivially crackable.

    You can, therefore, expect an entire community of BTC "grave" robbers to develop, who will, instead of wasting CPU time on mining new blocks, waste it on reclaiming old blocks

    Note as an aside, when you see block-0 spent, you can presume the NSA can easily read your old encrypted email.
  • Bad news. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by girlintraining (1395911) on Friday November 01, 2013 @10:54PM (#45308361)

    including a protocol called "trustless mixing" that combines users' coins together before encoding it into the ledger."

    I got some bad news; The Silk Road tried the same thing. It failed. But I mean, whadda expect... the government likes getting paid. Kindof a lot. And so they have entire divisions of the government setup to make sure they can track down people who try to hide money from them and, well, make them pay.

    But for the moment, let's ignore all that. Some crypto-anarchist hacked something together over the course of a few weekends and that's all solved. Great!

    Next question: The NSA is evil and watching everything, except of course this, which is totally impregnable and would be pretty much the terrorist currency of choice... what compelling moral, ethical, or technical arguments can you provide that dropping my "money" into a e-blender and setting it to frappe will result in delicious privacy juices coming out in the same quantity as I put in, and is totally resistant to attack? I've learned in security that you can get either tamper-evident, or tamper-resistant... but trying to get both is enormously difficult. So I really, well and truly, want to know how you plan on having the necessary robust auditing and controls necessary to ensure that transactions are fair and correctly executed, while at the same time dropping the ledgers into your e-blender... while trusting the now-anonymized agents utilizing such a thing not to find some way to exploit the system... using the system itself to cover their tracks?

  • Re:Deceased owners (Score:4, Interesting)

    by pla (258480) on Saturday November 02, 2013 @10:27AM (#45310881) Journal
    I am a Bitcoin developer and have been for years. Your entire theory is garbage.

    Okay, fellow Bitcoin dev - Explain to me what happens when (not "if") someone can generate a given SHA256 hash, and why that doesn't let an attacker write arbitrary transactions into the block chain?

    Not talking about actually cracking the ECDSA pair here (though that would certainly satisfy my claim, and it too will eventually become possible) - I just mean the ability to spoof the hash on the PaytoPubkeyHash transaction to match the provided PK. Bam, transaction validates, done.

    Or do you base your assertion on merely trusting an NSA-designed hash to remain uncrackable forever? If so, I can't help but notice that not all in the BTC dev community share your optimism, judging by how often the topic "should we switch to SHA3 yet" comes up.

MATH AND ALCOHOL DON'T MIX! Please, don't drink and derive. Mathematicians Against Drunk Deriving

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