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Facebook and Microsoft Disclose Government Requests For User Data 140

Posted by Soulskill
from the know-when-to-walk-away-know-when-to-run dept.
wiredmikey writes "Facebook and Microsoft say they received thousands of requests for information from U.S. authorities last year but are prohibited from listing a separate tally for security-related requests or secret court orders related to terror probes. The two companies have come under heightened scrutiny since reports leaked of a vast secret Internet surveillance program U.S. authorities insist targets only foreign terror suspects and is needed to prevent attacks. Facebook said Friday it had received between 9,000 and 10,000 requests for user data affecting 18,000 to 19,000 accounts during the second half of last year and Microsoft said it had received 6,000 to 7,000 requests affecting 31,000 to 32,000 accounts during the same period." Meanwhile, an article at the Guardian is suggesting the government may have better targets to pursue than Edward Snowden. "[U.S. director of national intelligence James Clapper] has come out vocally to condemn Snowden as a traitor to the public interest and the country, yet a review of Booz Allen's own history suggests that the government should be investigating his former employer, rather than the whistleblower."
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Facebook and Microsoft Disclose Government Requests For User Data

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  • Treason (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 15, 2013 @06:26PM (#44017627)

    "[U.S. director of national intelligence James Clapper] has come out vocally to condemn Snowden as a traitor to the public interest and the country"

    No. The people responsible for spying on American citizens are the ones who have betrayed their country and the public interest. They're the ones who should be caught, tried, and imprisoned. Government officials who violate the US constitution are traitors. People like Snowden are heroes.

    • Re:Treason (Score:4, Interesting)

      by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @08:07PM (#44018243)

      o. The people responsible for spying on American citizens are the ones who have betrayed their country and the public interest.

      I doubt they see it that way. And in any case, it's easy to blame somebody else... or a group of people... but let me ask: Did you vote in the last election? Did you write to your congress critters at any point during the long procession of decisions that has led us to this point? Held up a sign on a street corner? Had a meaningful discussion with a stranger about this? Met with anyone to discuss the problem? Democracy doesn't run very well on apathy... it's rather like pouring diesel into a gas tank... the results aren't pretty and the engine usually dies as a result.

      They're the ones who should be caught, tried, and imprisoned.

      Might I suggest that since we already have the highest incarceration rate of any country on the planet we start looking to solutions to social problems that don't involve sending people to our criminal education centers? Because that's pretty much what prison is: It's a place you go to meet like-minded people and learn all kinds of shit you wouldn't otherwise learn... and are then normalized to the idea that what you did was okay. And then you're released back into society where you're promptly told you have few housing or employment options, no friends, and very often just the clothes on your back. Oh... and a fresh new education.

      . Government officials who violate the US constitution are traitors.

      "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude than the animated contest of freedom â" go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen!" -- Samuel Adams

      If you aren't participating, you're part of the problem. As part of the problem, you must be a traitor. As a traitor, you should be executed. (grabs a big rock) So, how do you want to die, sinner?! ... In other news, extreme statements like calling people "traitors" can result in extreme reactions, like stoning to death. Of course, a more civilized discourse would avoid using words like "traitor" to describe government officials carrying out their official duties, and perhaps might focus instead on the actual constitutional definition of what a traitor is... since you did invoke the Constitution afterall. Since you're obviously unfamiliar with the relevant passage...

      Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court. The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted.

      People like Snowden are heroes.

      Snowden himself disagrees with your assessment.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I doubt they see it that way.

        Of course they don't. That's part of the problem.

        Democracy doesn't run very well on apathy... it's rather like pouring diesel into a gas tank... the results aren't pretty and the engine usually dies as a result.

        Democracy doesn't run very well on apathy, but apathy is itself the product of a failed democracy. You're deluding yourself if you think apathy suffices to explain the sorry state in which we find ourselves. Perhaps some reading [google.com] is in order?

        Might I suggest that since we a

      • When it comes to heroes, it's time for a reality check. A huge number of people who the public would call heroes - whether it's the citizens who ran towards the building that collapsed recently in Philadelphia, or the first responders to 9/11, or Sully, the pilot who landed a plane on the Hudson safely - don't consider themselves heroes. There's already a few disparate terms that describe it in media, from hero self-deprecation to the "humble hero". I can't find one that describes this phenomenon in real li
      • Re:Treason (Score:5, Insightful)

        by 1000101 (584896) on Sunday June 16, 2013 @01:27AM (#44019919)

        People like Snowden are heroes

        Snowden himself disagrees with your assessment.

        Charles Barkley doesn't think he's a role model either, but guess what... he is. When people do extraordinary things, there is a significant chance that millions of people will hold such actions in high regard and elevate said person to 'role model' or 'hero' status. Snowden is a hero for the simple fact that he ousted illegal activity by a government organization. If the actions weren't illegal, but were just 'super secret', Snowden would be a traitor and should hang. But no, all he did was risk his own life to expose quite possibly the worst betrayal of trust the U.S. government has ever bestowed upon its citizens.

      • Did you vote in the last election? If you voted, then you are partly to blame for the problems in your society. By refusing to vote for evil, you are not supporting evil. And politicians are nothing if not evil.

        Oh, but third party you might cry. First: Waste of time. Second: Evil anyway. Third: Will be cooperated by the system and become evil even if you don't think that they are now.

        In conclusion, if you vote Democrat or Republican in the USA you are part of the problem. If you vote third party, you are wa

    • AC parent (modded +5 Insightful) is a dupe [slashdot.org] which...

      1. AC, first post
      2. copy/paste dupes

      adds up to BOT...

      parent is a bot, or a paid commentor, or a very misguided troll...plz mod down

    • Have to agree. Obama is actually complicit with all this so should be brought up on charges. In fact Obama more than others since he explicitly states he will uphold the U.S. Constitution when he takes the job.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    "[U.S. director of national intelligence James Clapper] has come out vocally to condemn Snowden as a traitor to the public interest and the country"

    No. It's the people responsible for spying on American citizens who have betrayed their country and the public interest. They are the ones who should be tried and punished for treason. People like Snowden are heroes. It's those who violate the US Constitution who are traitors.

  • by FuzzNugget (2840687) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @06:35PM (#44017665)

    "[U.S. director of national intelligence James Clapper] has come out vocally to condemn Snowden as a traitor to the public interest and the country"

    I simply cannot wrap my head around this. How is it in public's interest to be constantly surveiled in violation of the bill of rights?

    • by El_Muerte_TDS (592157) <elmuerteNO@SPAMdrunksnipers.com> on Saturday June 15, 2013 @06:45PM (#44017719) Homepage

      Wait. I thought Snowden was a liar. So how could he be a traitor to [USA] public interest?

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by ebno-10db (1459097)
        blackwhite
      • by Anonymous Coward
        It's called doublethink.
        These idiots read 1984 and used it as a guideline for everything they do.
    • by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @07:03PM (#44017831)

      I simply cannot wrap my head around this. How is it in public's interest to be constantly surveiled in violation of the bill of rights?

      It gets better. Mr. Clapper said, under oath and before Congress, that Snowden "didn't have the access" necessary to make his claims. He then goes on to state that he's a traitor. Well... he's lying about one of these two things: Either Snowden had access to classified information and is a credible source... or he didn't have access, in which case he can't be a traitor, because he's not giving away government secrets, since he never had them to begin with.

      I suspect this is the NSA version of "We don't have a problem and we're working to fix it as quickly as possible," and by fixing, of course we mean throwing someone under the bus. Since Snowden is at the bottom of the food chain, we'll start there, and continue feeding people to the lions at progressively higher levels of the bureauacracy until the "problem" goes away. And the problem of course isn't that the NSA is doing this, but that they got pants'd by some kid. Remember, it's not wrong if it's legal! -_-

      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        It's the NSA version of saying what is necessary to appease the congress. Normally they only have to deal with a very tiny committee of inner circle friends, like Feinstein. But every so often some of the sheep in congress wake up and start asking questions, and it makes the security people nervous.

      • Well... he's lying about one of these two things: Either Snowden had access to classified information and is a credible source... or he didn't have access, in which case he can't be a traitor, because he's not giving away government secrets, since he never had them to begin with.

        Snowden made a large list of claims. If just one of them is true, or even partially true, he can both not have the access he claims to have and still be considered a traitor. I like what Snowden did, but I'm pointing out a really obvious flaw in your logic.

        • by osu-neko (2604)

          Well... he's lying about one of these two things: Either Snowden had access to classified information and is a credible source... or he didn't have access, in which case he can't be a traitor, because he's not giving away government secrets, since he never had them to begin with.

          Snowden made a large list of claims. If just one of them is true, or even partially true, he can both not have the access he claims to have and still be considered a traitor. I like what Snowden did, but I'm pointing out a really obvious flaw in your logic.

          The really obvious flaw in your logic is that it requires more than the claim to be true. If I claim the US is secretly recording the content of conversations between Americans (based on my personal speculation), that doesn't make me a traitor, even if it's true. On the other hand, I'm arguably a traitor if the government gives me access to that information and I then betray my NDA/oath/security clearance and reveal it. He really did need to have the access he claims, or it's not really treason, because

    • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @07:18PM (#44017889)

      I simply cannot wrap my head around this. How is it in public's interest to be constantly surveiled in violation of the bill of rights?

      That is what happens when the people in power become convinced of their own righteousness. It is not an evil plot, it is simply the natural result of fact that basically no one ever thinks of themselves as the bad guy. So if they are the good guys, then whatever they do must also be good. They convince themselves that any harmful side-effects truly are minimal (easy to do when the side-effects don't impact them directly) and are a necessary cost for the greater good.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Apparently you don't understand. Most of the bill of rights was has long been nibbled at, even in the beginning our more perfect union we passed a sedition act to quell speech.

      Heck, search for "Civil Asset Forfeiture" and be horrified.

      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        Usually the courts determine after the fact that the actions were unconstitutional. I suspect it will also happen in this case, if we wait long enough.

        • by Fnord666 (889225)

          Usually the courts determine after the fact that the actions were unconstitutional. I suspect it will also happen in this case, if we wait long enough.

          Because that worked so well with the telcos.

  • by houbou (1097327) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @06:38PM (#44017677) Journal
    did the right thing. The truth is, I believe that MANY more Americans would be in favor of the government sifting through the information IF they were informed of such processes. The problem is transparency, or the lack of it actually. Covertly operating as they are doing, to me, is the real issue. That being said, I personally think that regardless of transparency, I've always assumed Big Brother was watching more than it should, but I've never let it bothered me because it would be just much ado about nothing.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      A head in the sand argument to this spying doesn't hold water, the "I don't do anything wrong, so no problem" argument. It is a problem for everyone simply because people you support can be spyed on, and the information can then be used against them. If a republican government is in power, they can spy on the democrats for example. Objectors to any government policy can be spyed on and their cause undermined. This is a massive problem for America. Sitting here in Australia the media is reporting this quite

  • read carefully (Score:5, Informative)

    by stenvar (2789879) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @06:42PM (#44017695)

    If you read carefully, saying that specific requests have come in for 20000 users doesn't mean that there aren't other mechanisms in place to collect a lot more data without specific requests. For example, the NSA could be collecting data where Facebook's servers connect to the Internet. Past reports and disclosures on NSA activities (as well as the activities of other spy agencies) suggest that this is likely routine practice. Facebook doesn't even deny this, and of course even if they did, it's questionable whether such a denial was meaningful. In addition, it's clear that the NSA and other agencies actively collect data from all open sources that they can. And, of course, you have to assume that the Utah data center is going to be used to store something, and it ain't gonna be data obtained from just 20000 Facebook-related requests, because those would fit on my hard drive.

    So I don't know what these disclosures are supposed to accomplish. They really don't change anything. At the root of the problem is really that there isn't enough transparency and that people have lost trust. What we need and should demand is complete legal, fiscal, and legislative transparency on our spy organizations, what they are legally allowed to do, who sets limits on them, and how much we're spending on it. I don't see why understanding in such general terms what these organizations do should hinder their ability to catch terrorists. And if such disclosures really interfere with their capabilities, that suggests by itself that they are doing something they shouldn't be doing.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      the 20 000 requests are just normal requests for "normal" crimes.

      the requests for crimes to be decided later as such, and taps for them, are secret and it's a treason to tell how they are performed since it's a "critical tool".

      naturally that kind of thing existing can only be a pr disaster sooner or later. since people can't believe what the companies are saying since the company personnel would be performing a crime if they admitted to it. however as another catch they're as public companies required to in

    • Re:read carefully (Score:4, Informative)

      by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @07:29PM (#44017963)

      doesn't mean that there aren't other mechanisms in place to collect a lot more data without specific requests. For example, the NSA could be collecting data where Facebook's servers connect to the Internet.

      Apparently SSL encryption at all of the large internet corps is handled by dedicated front-ends - and the network between the SSL front-ends and the real guts of entities like facebook, google, etc are all in the clear. That makes for a perfect location for the NSA to drop their sniffers in, no need to compromise any SSL certs at all, no forward secrecy, etc, just wide open traffic perfect for raw harvesting.

      And, of course, you have to assume that the Utah data center is going to be used to store something, and it ain't gonna be data obtained from just 20000 Facebook-related requests, because those would fit on my hard drive.

      I think that bears repeating - the NSA ain't building data silos (there are others, like one in san antonio, texas [nsa.gov]) that consume as much electricity as a small city for nothing. They are collecting literally tons of data on us, its gotta be coming from somewhere.

      • The electrical consumption of the the Utah installation is estimated roughly at $40 million/y. At 0.07 per kwhr that's roughly 500 million kwh / yr.

        Google as a company is believed to use about 2 billion kWh / yr.

        So we can probably say just Google will have 4x the data of this site.

      • by Fnord666 (889225)

        Apparently SSL encryption at all of the large internet corps is handled by dedicated front-ends - and the network between the SSL front-ends and the real guts of entities like facebook, google, etc are all in the clear. That makes for a perfect location for the NSA to drop their sniffers in, no need to compromise any SSL certs at all, no forward secrecy, etc, just wide open traffic perfect for raw harvesting.

        Even if they are using SSL between the front end and the middle tier, self signed certs are probably used between those layers and its "game over" anyway in that case.

        • by osu-neko (2604)

          Even if they are using SSL between the front end and the middle tier, self signed certs are probably used between those layers and its "game over" anyway in that case.

          You think whether the cert is self-signed or not is relevant in this case, you fundamentally misunderstand the problem. Having Verisign sign the cert wouldn't do jack-diddly-squat here.

    • And if such disclosures really interfere with their capabilities, that suggests by itself that they are doing something they shouldn't be doing.

      Not necessarily. There's good reason to capture all kinds of metadata ahead of time, and store it for a period of time; The most practical argument is that it reduces the cost of executing search warrants. Anyone who's worked in IT knows that the moment you have a database, people are going to want access, and eventually, mirrors of at least some of that data is going to start cropping up elsewhere on the network. It'll be exported to spreadsheets, it'll be handed to the building maintenance people, it'll b

      • Re:read carefully (Score:4, Insightful)

        by stenvar (2789879) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @08:24PM (#44018371)

        A lot of this "big scary NSA" non-sense is based on a misconception that just because the NSA is capturing this information means they're using it, or even looking at it.

        The fact that this information is easily available at all, and potentially without a court order, is a threat to our political system. You can be sure that the president gets national security reports on all major political figures, both allies and foes alike. Tax evasion, extramarital affairs, homosexuality, illegitimate children, drug habits, whatever are all considered security relevant and would of course be reported. And all of those also happen to be wonderful means for exerting pressure on people to vote his way or drop out of political races. This is too powerful a political weapon to give to the executive branch.

        • The fact that this information is easily available at all, and potentially without a court order, is a threat to our political system.

          Dude, a lack of citizen participation is a threat to our political system, but I'm sure you're leaping from the couch right now, rushing out the door without even grabbing your coat, and driving like a crazy man down to your local congress critter's office and telling them what a threat it is. Or, more likely, you're doing what every other American does when faced with a political crisis: Turn on the TV and pat yourself on the back about how you agree with the talking heads of your choice, and then go to be

      • by Agripa (139780)

        Not necessarily. There's good reason to capture all kinds of metadata ahead of time, and store it for a period of time; The most practical argument is that it reduces the cost of executing search warrants.

        The NSA also would not want anybody else to know what their search criteria is. They are at least as vulnerable to traffic analysis as anybody else. If they seize the data, err, I mean acquire and archive the data, then their searches are all local and away from prying eyes.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      They legally can't disclose the FISA requests, they can however quite legally lie about them.

      They can see their businesses going up in smoke, nobody can use the Cloud Services now if the NSA has access to them. Facebook will face worldwide probes and legal bars.

      Occam Razor says, they are lying to save their business.

      It's the one thing they can legally do under US law. As I wrote that a wave of despair went down my back.

    • by elucido (870205)

      If you read carefully, saying that specific requests have come in for 20000 users doesn't mean that there aren't other mechanisms in place to collect a lot more data without specific requests. For example, the NSA could be collecting data where Facebook's servers connect to the Internet. Past reports and disclosures on NSA activities (as well as the activities of other spy agencies) suggest that this is likely routine practice. Facebook doesn't even deny this, and of course even if they did, it's questionable whether such a denial was meaningful. In addition, it's clear that the NSA and other agencies actively collect data from all open sources that they can. And, of course, you have to assume that the Utah data center is going to be used to store something, and it ain't gonna be data obtained from just 20000 Facebook-related requests, because those would fit on my hard drive.

      So I don't know what these disclosures are supposed to accomplish. They really don't change anything. At the root of the problem is really that there isn't enough transparency and that people have lost trust. What we need and should demand is complete legal, fiscal, and legislative transparency on our spy organizations, what they are legally allowed to do, who sets limits on them, and how much we're spending on it. I don't see why understanding in such general terms what these organizations do should hinder their ability to catch terrorists. And if such disclosures really interfere with their capabilities, that suggests by itself that they are doing something they shouldn't be doing.

      They are throwing numbers out there to try to put the genie back in the bottle but Americans already know.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 15, 2013 @06:55PM (#44017773)

    https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/pardon-edward-snowden/Dp03vGYD

  • by Dereck1701 (1922824) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @07:01PM (#44017811)

    What are all of the three letter agencies so afraid of? I mean, If they aren't doing anything wrong they shouldn't be concerned with some reasonable transparency. As long as they don't have anything to hide, right?

    Its always amazing how some federal agencies seem to think it is so important to have unfettered access to others information so they can "keep a vigilant eye out" yet they so detest anyone making sure that their own activities remain above board. Especially in light of the obvious revolving door between the private sector companies which stand to make billions, and the three letter agencies dolling out those fees. As noted in the Guardian article James Clapper the current director of National Intelligence, one of the loudest voices of "disapproval" against Snowden's actions, was Vice-President of Booz Allen Hamilton not too long ago. That coupled with his lies to congress in regards to these programs............ If we're looking for traitors I'm far more concerned with the ones who are fleecing the American taxpayers out of hundreds of billions of dollars and lying to government inquests than one individual who released classified documents in an attempt to inform the public about possibly illegal acts.

    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      What are all of the three letter agencies so afraid of? I mean, If they aren't doing anything wrong they shouldn't be concerned with some reasonable transparency. As long as they don't have anything to hide, right?

      Privacy advocates always say "if you have nothing to hide, hide everything". And that is exactly what these organisations obviously try to do: hide everything.

      Now the difference of course is that you and I are individuals, and the FBI, CIA, NSA, etc. are US-government subsidised organisations. It would make sense if the people that pay for them (the general population) would be kept in the know of what they're up to, and how well they perform. Yet they simply try to "hide everything".

      The other issue I have

  • by Black Parrot (19622) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @07:12PM (#44017865)

    making public officials look bad.

  • by skegg (666571) on Saturday June 15, 2013 @07:23PM (#44017909)

    Is it appropriate to report half a year's worth of data?

    Facebook said Friday it had received between 9,000 and 10,000 requests for user data... during the second half of last year

    Though not unheard of, six months is an uncommon period to report; isn't the general expectation that they would report a full year's worth? Of course that would result in the requests being approximately doubled. My concern would be people will remember the amount as "9,000 and 10,000 requests per year".

    This reminds me of politicians who also skew the time period to make dollar amounts appear larger or smaller.
    To make dollar amounts appear larger, they increase the time period ("we're investing $4 billion over ten years").
    An innovative approach recently used by Australian Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus to convince Australians that politicians were only awarding themselves a tiny increase in public money was to use the following: the increase is only a dollar per vote per year.

    I suspect the choice of "six months" was a deliberate attempt to skew the perception of the requests.

    • by osu-neko (2604)
      That seems a bit of a stretch. The more straightforward insidious reason to report the second half of last year's data is because it looks a lot better than the first half of the year's data. People will see 9-10 thousand in half a year and assume, okay, that means about 18-20 thousand in a year, when in fact the whole year's stats were much worse...
  • This sort of surveillance ("We need to look at these specific accounts") doesn't bother me: that's how search warrants are supposed to work. (Well, assuming they are looking for terrorists and not just harassing Tea Party people.) This seems quite different from some other recent disclosures, like the Verizon warrants: "Give us records of all calls made." Search warrants, to be constitutional, have to be specific. General warrants [thefreedictionary.com] were abused by the British and are a specific reason the Fourth Amendment was

    • by Agripa (139780)

      I suspect the warrants were for specific content that would fall under even their tortured interpretation of the 4th amendment and one of them every 3 months or more often was for *all* of their metadata just like Verizon and other provided. They had a bigger stick to use on the telecommunication companies as Quest found out so dealing with them is easier.

  • A phrase that can be read two ways...

  • http://www.vupen.com/english/ [vupen.com]
    "defensive and offensive cyber security". Helsingin Sanomat, biggest newspaper in Finland, claims the company is selling security holes (most likely accompanied with easy way to use them) for governments and intelligence agencies.
    In Finnish: http://www.hs.fi/ulkomaat/Tietoturva-aukoilla+tahkotaan+miljoonia/a1371264995752 [www.hs.fi]

    • by TeknoHog (164938)
      In a HS commentary to that story they ask if cyber weapons trade should be regulated as well as IRL weapons. That would be something from redundant to hilarious, considering things like (a) strong crypto is already regulated like weapons when exported from the US, (b) the root of the problem is consumer software like Windows, so perhaps it should be classified likewise, and (c) how do you regulate people exchanging data, on the Internet or otherwise.
  • ... its a feedback loop for manipulation of the public via controlled media (Main Stream Media).
    Silicon valley should know this and Hollywood certainly does about how feedback loops are used to promote one thing or another.

    There is no way such a large amount of spying can be filtered as abstract language is only as useful as the definitions applied by those using it. In other words, a terrorist plot could be communicated in a manner of common conversation that is undetectable. But certainly spying on such a

  • by dgharmon (2564621) on Sunday June 16, 2013 @12:09PM (#44022075) Homepage
    For years, the Carlyle Group [nytimes.com] has tried to shed its former reputation as a second home for government officials and a specialist in buying defense companies. But the recent fracas over the National Security Agencyâs [nytimes.com] surveillance programs highlights the private equity giant's remaining ties to government work: its majority stake in Booz Allen Hamilton, the employer of the whistle-blower, Edward J. Snowden [nytimes.com].
  • So, I'm clicking links and trying to RTFA with some dry, carefully constructed analysis of alleged data, but no actual fucking data? What kinds of people were spied upon? Has anyone got a copy of the list of which accounts? Are any of us on it? Do we know how much the gubberment knows?
  • "Facebook and Microsoft Disclose Government Requests For User Data"

    Oh yeah, I believe everything that Microsoft and Facebook says about it being the nice guy here and "disclosure" of information.

    I have seen scams run on T.V. at 2AM in the morning more convincing than that statement.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWyHiV3l3MA [youtube.com]

    -Hack

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