Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Microsoft Releases 2012 Law Enforcement Requests Report

Comments Filter:
  • Eventually we will boil it down to two categories: Linux and other shit.

  • by wbr1 (2538558) on Thursday March 21, 2013 @01:40PM (#43236653)
    I am glad to see I am not the only one who deos not know what to say about this. We all want to bash MS, but here they actualyy did something pro-consumer/pro-society without a legal mandate to do so. What can be said?
    Sorry microsoft, I am still not going to reccomend windows 8 though.
    • by Nerdfest (867930)

      If their competition does it, they look pretty bad not doing it. Perhaps they can release a bribery report on those interactions with government next.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        hahaha. It's funny cuz it's true. And sad. Kinda like Walmart with that whole mexican bribery thing. Haven't heard peep about that in months. Looks like the giant beast gets away with yet more bullshit.

  • I get that the US is up there, France & Germany have a surprising amount of requests, but I'm pretty sure at least France is a firewall country. But Turkey... what? They have 11k legit internet users?

    They are right up there w the states at 11k, there is no reference to Turkey anywhere in my knowledge of IT and how it applies to the world, so why would they have so many requests.

    • by Nixoloco (675549)

      I get that the US is up there, France & Germany have a surprising amount of requests, but I'm pretty sure at least France is a firewall country. But Turkey... what? They have 11k legit internet users?

      They are right up there w the states at 11k, there is no reference to Turkey anywhere in my knowledge of IT and how it applies to the world, so why would they have so many requests.

      I found that curious as well. It may be related to the fact that Turkey has a lot of "laws [wikipedia.org] that limit speech deemed insulting to Turkishness, and expressions of political extremism". They are fairly heavy into Internet censorship [wikipedia.org] as well and even blocked all of YouTube for a long time. There are a lot of topics that aren't allowed to report about and they have ongoing legal proceedings [rsf.org] against lots of online journalists.

      • by Synerg1y (2169962)

        Never knew Turkey was so heavy on being a police state. I always thought that region was at best a bit lawless. Numbers are numbers though, same # of requests as the states, 1/4 the people. Thanks for the answer, I feel like they've stayed off the radar in the internet censorship debate completely.

  • I wonder why. Is it because Microsoft is becoming less relevant (in the online world where NSLs would apply), or because there's a reduction in NSLs overall.

    I suspect, considering Google didn't see a similar decline, the former.

    • by robp (64931)

      You should know soon enough--although the administration doesn't want the recipients of NSLs getting too specific, the FBI has to cough up a yearly total. It provided a count for 2011 (16,511 NSLs, covering 7,201 people [fas.org]) on April 30 of last year, so if they stick to that timing we should get last year's total in another month or so.

  • And once again, despite all the noise and hype... the numbers are vanishingly small. Much smaller than you'd expect.

    And no, don't come back with "but they should be zero". That's just ignorant and stupid. The 'net is a central part of a lot of people's lives now and if they're under investigation their 'net activity is and should be part of that, just like phone records, credit card records, etc... etc...

The number of computer scientists in a room is inversely proportional to the number of bugs in their code.

Working...