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Hockey Sticks Among Carry-On Items TSA Has Cleared For Planes 276

Posted by samzenpus
from the clearing-stick dept.
coondoggie writes "As of April 25th the Transportation Security Administration will let a bunch of previously prohibited items such as small pocket knives and what it calls 'novelty' or toy bats to be taken on aircraft as carry-ons. The idea the agency said was to let Transportation Security Officers better focus their efforts on spotting higher-threat items such as explosives and guns."
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Hockey Sticks Among Carry-On Items TSA Has Cleared For Planes

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  • we're nerds (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Let us know when they change their policy on light sabers.

  • by lseltzer (311306) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:47PM (#43099771)
    It won't fit under the seat in front of you or the overhead bin.
    • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:51PM (#43099821)
      It would get checked at the gate, just like any other large item. So it still wouldn't be brought onboard a plane. All this is is an attempt to deflect some of the criticism of the TSA as security theater
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        It would get checked at the gate, just like any other large item. So it still wouldn't be brought onboard a plane. All this is is an attempt to deflect some of the criticism of the TSA as security theater

        Perhaps, BUT consider this. If they do allow items such as "small pocket knives" etc. I think this is just a prelude to another (likely staged) "incident" that they will parade throughout the media proclaiming "See, we are needed. See, there is danger. See, you need to increase our budget and take more citizen rights away. Do it. Do it NOW!"

        You know you want to.

    • by Obfuscant (592200)

      It won't fit under the seat in front of you or the overhead bin.

      A hockey stick certainly would fit in an overhead bin, at least on any aircraft larger than the Embraer/CRJ types used by commuter and express operators.

    • by mjwx (966435)

      It won't fit under the seat in front of you or the overhead bin.

      The flight attendants would take it and store it with the suits. They'd hand it back as you disembarked.

  • by BenSchuarmer (922752) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:47PM (#43099775)
    as long as people still aren't allowed to carry on enough liquid to make an ice rink.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @09:17PM (#43100549)

      The international organization for flight standards (ICAO), that the TSA is now coming into alignment with, is based in Montreal. The hockey stick thing makes sense now, eh?

      Of course, I'm now afraid that if a couple of passengers got into a fight, a hockey game might break out.

  • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:47PM (#43099779)
    You know, so that a woman can't park in an airline employee lot (which requires going through 2 security gates, one that looks at a badge and one that actually has to scan the airport-issued badge before you can park there), board an employee bus, and get dropped off on the ramp. As someone who works at an airport (actually the same one where all this happened), actual airport security is a joke. It is handled by minimum-wage contractors. I know plenty of other stores of people I've worked with that are even worse than this, but for the protection of them and myself I won't bring them up.
  • by CncRobot (2849261) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:48PM (#43099791)

    The TSA is now allowing the actual types of things used on 9/11, but still banning shampoo and bottled water?

    If there is ONE THING the TSA should ban is small knives (not that I agree with that), since they are now allowing those shouldn't they just admit they shouldn't need to exist?

    • by bananaquackmoo (1204116) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:52PM (#43099831)
      If you take a look they still ban small knives, just not super tiny toy swiss army knife style ones that people forget are on their keychains.
      • Bummer, my Letherman is still banned. I feel naked without it. I cant open most small electronics packaging without tools.

      • by tompaulco (629533)

        If you take a look they still ban small knives, just not super tiny toy swiss army knife style ones that people forget are on their keychains.

        The other day I was digging around in my coat pocket and came across a matchbook that I had gotten at Papadeaux in Dallas probably 4 years ago. That got me to wondering how many airplanes I have been on since then with that in my coat pocket. I should count myself lucky not to have a TSA agent permanently lodged in my rectum at this point.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Matches are allowed, Lighters are not.

          From my time in the Army.:
          On the charter plane my unit was taking all of us had our issued weapons. M4, M249, 240B, etc. They took our lighters away from us because it was against federal flight regulations.

          • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @09:56PM (#43100807)

            Matches are allowed, Lighters are not.

            From my time in the Army.:
            On the charter plane my unit was taking all of us had our issued weapons. M4, M249, 240B, etc. They took our lighters away from us because it was against federal flight regulations.

            This happened to me too. The TSA guy says "take off your shoes" and i replied "Dude im holding an M16". Then... took off my damn shoes 0.o

          • Lighters are not

            Incorrect.

            Lighters are permitted, just not torch-style, which makes lighting my cigars a little more tricky.

            • by cffrost (885375) on Thursday March 07, 2013 @12:59AM (#43101837) Homepage

              Lighters are not

              Incorrect.

              Lighters are permitted, just not torch-style, which makes lighting my cigars a little more tricky.

              Tricky? My dear fellow, either type of lighter is perfectly adequate for setting a hundred dollar bill alight, from which all proper gentlemen light their cigars.

              Berkshire Hathaway stock certificates also work well, though I've heard that the uncouth 99.99%er rabble find the practice "obscene." Jeeves is quite adept at tossing them off the clubhouse grounds in short order, so I couldn't say for certain.

              • Funny, but wrong. The elite know better than to use money, paper, matches, or petrol lighters to light their cigars and pipes. Anything other than a smokeless flame will taint the tobacco.

                Anyone who burns money to light their cigar is just demonstrating they still belong in the 99%.
    • Not to mention my double edged razor blades.

      I mean, come on, terrorist don't shave!

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Uh, no.

      The real threat isn't another 9/11-type event. They can no longer hijack an airplane with a box cutter, even if the plane is filled with nothing but girl scouts and smurfs. They will be dead before you reach the ground, mission unaccomplished. At worst, one or two people will be stabbed. No one is going to cooperate with these guys for fear of their own lives, because in they will be dead anyway.

      But there is still the threat of someone sneaking a bomb on board to kill all passengers and destroy the a

  • by evil_aaronm (671521) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:48PM (#43099797)
    But I play lacrosse, you insensitive clods!
  • Canada! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Mullen (14656) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:50PM (#43099817)

    Damn it, now Canadians will be hijacking our planes.

  • by lazarus (2879) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:55PM (#43099873) Journal

    Let's face it. The reason people drag all of their worldly possessions with them as carry-on is because we don't trust the baggage handlers to not destroy/steal/lose our stuff. I see this every time I fly. People don't actually want to lug a 49.9 lb wheeled bag onto the plane and then try to find/lift/get help to put it in an overhead compartment.

    The carry-on problem is being caused by the baggage problem. If you solve the baggage problem, TSA security would be checking small handbags or pocket change not hockey sticks, LAN party servers, thirty pairs of shoes, etc.

    Oh, and charging people for checked bags is making the problem worse, not better. What is it about the airline industry that has made every decision maker involved utterly stupid? The only aspect of air travel I can think of that doesn't operate in a wrong-headed way are the mechanics who keep the planes from falling out of the sky.

    {rant/}

    • by Amouth (879122) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @08:11PM (#43100037)

      The only aspect of air travel I can think of that doesn't operate in a wrong-headed way are the mechanics who keep the planes from falling out of the sky.

      {rant/}

      Do your self a favor and don't look into that one too much.

    • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @08:30PM (#43100207)

      And why are people dragging all of their worldly possessions on a 3-day trip to Ft. Lauderdale? Pack better, and you will see a lot of these problems disappear. I've worked on the ramp several years, and most of the times that I've seen bags damaged/lost (lost as in won't make your flight) is because they are so overpacked or packed lopsided that they fall off a tug, get stuck under other bags weighing 65lbs, or just burst open. It seems like in most cases the bags that are the most overpacked are also bags that are 10 years old, ripped, and have one or both handles broken off. If people didn't overpack as much as they do, things would not be as bad as they are. Also, it seems like most people like to buy these bags that have all these unnecessary buckles, straps, and knobs that get caught on literally everything. The doors and floors of the cargoholds are in most cases not smooth. There are screws sticking up, edges of panels are raised up, and the door designs of MD-88/90/DC-9s are so poorly designed that zippers and other random parts are bound to get stuck and snap off. The best suitcase to buy is one of the harder, plastic 4 wheel spinners, as they are the least likely to get caught, and I don't think I've ever seen broken handles on them. But all of these cheap, flimsy cloth bags with little to no structural support? Of course they're going to get broken, they are made as cheap as possible. And steal stuff? We're lucky if we have 40 minutes to offload 100 bags and put 100 bags back on to a plane. Ignoring the fact that most baggage handlers would never steal stuff, they wouldn't even have the time to steal stuff if they wanted to. Purchase suitcases wisely, use common sense when packing (you dont need 7 outfits and 5 pairs of shoes for a weekend trip ladies, sorry), and your bags will last longer and all your stuff will be waiting for you when you land.

      Oh, and for the love of god, if you buy a puppy from an out of state breeder, drive over there and pick your dog up yourself. Those things get terrified when they get stuck in a cargo hold for 5 hours.

      • by tompaulco (629533)
        It sounds like airplane baggage holds are a horrible place to put luggage in general. That is not a problem of the luggage. And it is quite evident that SOMEONE is stealing stuff from luggage. It's probably the TSA agents, not the ramp personnel. The ramp people are too busy. The TSA feel like they are the Gestapo and entitled to steal whatever they want from whomever they want.
      • by AK Marc (707885)

        And why are people dragging all of their worldly possessions on a 3-day trip to Ft. Lauderdale?

        Because you can't go out without having a full makeup case. And what do you do if the weather changes? Are you beaching in the day, and going out at night? Changing clothes every day? 6 sets of clothes (means 12 pair of shoes for women), full bathroom case, and whatever "extras" someone feels comfortable with.

        Oh, and for the love of god, if you buy a puppy from an out of state breeder, drive over there and pick your dog up yourself. Those things get terrified when they get stuck in a cargo hold for 5 hours.

        But they love the trunk for 16 hours?

        And steal stuff? We're lucky if we have 40 minutes to offload 100 bags and put 100 bags back on to a plane. Ignoring the fact that most baggage handlers would never steal stuff, they wouldn't even have the time to steal stuff if they wanted to.

        Funny, between dropping my bags off and the plane opening for the 100 bags in 10 minutes, they sit somewhere for 2+ hours, often coming home with a "you've been

    • by jbwolfe (241413)

      What is it about the airline industry that has made every decision maker involved utterly stupid?

      I suppose, the desire to eke out a profit in what is now a highly competitive pricing environment. But I agree the nickle and dime-ing is annoying. They never ask me what I think of their ideas when they come up with stupid shit. They tell me to shut up and fly the plane.

      The only aspect of air travel I can think of that doesn't operate in a wrong-headed way are the mechanics who keep the planes from falling out of the sky.

      From my perspective (and the view is terrific), I always thought I did a pretty good job of keeping the plane from falling out of the sky, though I must admit I've had a few hard landings.

      • by lazarus (2879)

        Totally correct, and thanks for replying. I was thinking of the airline industry exclusive of the actual flying of the plane. I have nothing but praise for the pilots and for that matter the air traffic controllers. I can remember a time when it wasn't uncommon to circle an airport for 20 minutes before landing. That just never happens now.

        Re: Hard landings. Landed in Las Vegas on Sunday and actually bounced. First time for me. No complains though, no way in hell I could do it...

    • by Thomasje (709120)
      Maybe I'm just lucky, but I never had anything stolen or destroyed from my checked luggage. Even so, I try to travel light and cram everything into my carry-on... So I won't have to wait for half an hour or an hour at the carrousel, and so I won't have to pay the $25 or more per checked bag.
    • Let's face it. The reason people drag all of their worldly possessions with them as carry-on is because we don't trust the baggage handlers to not destroy/steal/lose our stuff. I see this every time I fly.

      Nope. Until airlines starting charging for baggage a few years back, finding room in the overhead bins was generally pretty easy outside of major business travel routes or high travel volume destinations/times.

      Oh, and charging people for checked bags is making the problem worse, not better. What i

    • by Cimexus (1355033)

      I think it's just baggage fees in the US that are the problem. People carrying insane amounts of carry on baggage and the whole "get on the plane early so you can get a spot for all your stuff in the overhead lockers" rigmarole is unique to the US - I'd never seen anything like it before I travelled in the US.

      Here in Australia airlines still include at least one checked bag as part of the ticket price. It's always been that way. Not for the discount airlines admittedly (Tiger, Jetstar), but they only have a

  • This is going to be great until a bunch of canadian terrorist hi-jack an airliner.
    • And then, like maple syrup, Canada's evil would ooze all over the United States.

      Which would then lead to our children pledging allegiance to the maple leaf, pouring mayonnaise over everything, winter 11 months of the year, and having Anne Murray on the radio all day, every day.

      Won't somebody think of the children?

  • by loganljb (1424009) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @07:57PM (#43099887)
    This is a fairly typical way to permanently take away freedom. Take away a LOT of freedom during an 'emergency', then later give back a small portion of that freedom. People will be so relieved by the small concessions that they forget the larger liberties that they no longer enjoy.
  • My question is... will passengers be allowed to carry one of these [discreet-romance.com] on board.
  • by Xanthvar (1046980) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @08:06PM (#43099975) Journal
    The ban on knives was cosmetic at best, so the lifting of this ban will not result in any decrease in safety.
    Q: "But wait, didn't the terrorists on 9/11 use box cutters to hijack the plane? Couldn't they do it again?"
    A: No. The reason that they were able to hijack the plane before, is the "rulebook" basically said to go along with the hijackers, you fly off to some other destination, there is a negotiation that drags things out, and eventually everyone leaves alive, with stories to tell their grandchildren... Only, on 9/11 they changed the "rules".

    Today, it doesn't matter what kind of weapon is used to hijack the plane, the bulk of the passengers will use whatever is at hand to beat down the hijackers, because they know they are fighting for their lives now, and if you are going to die, you might as well go down swinging. Coupling this with the _1_ security measure that actually improved airline safety, putting locks on the cockpit doors (which does nothing if they don't actually lock them of course), the chance of hijacking a passenger airliner successfully is almost nil. Maybe a small puddle jumper commuter craft composed of all terrorists would be successful, but in that circumstance, they wouldn't need weapons either.

    Yes, someone can still get hurt, and even killed, but you could do that with a pen/pencil or some other pointy object stabbed into the appropriate place. Now maybe someone from the UK will have a different take on this, as they seemed to fear bladed objects, as they appear to be the primary homicide weapon of choice since the general populace doesn't have access to firearms. As an American male, with military training I am not terribly afraid of knives being used to subdue a a plane full of passengers, whoever foolhardy that may be, as I believe that sheer weight of numbers would incapacitate or kill any would be hijacker in this. For most Americans, a knife is a tool, and not a weapon, and while it can be used as such, so can just about anything else, to include bricks, shoes, rocks, sharp sticks, and harsh language.

    Just my $.02 worth.
    • by Ecuador (740021)

      You are right. Apparently there are a lot of people fooled by the post 9/11 security theater and are complaining about this change http://edition.cnn.com/2013/03/06/travel/tsa-carry-on-changes/ [cnn.com]. These people (air marshals, flight attendants) should know better, but I guess the US government has managed to drop the average citizen IQ by about 20 units in recent years.

      What is interesting is that while I have lost numerous swiss army knives and pocket screwdrivers (I always have a multi-tool with me and I ofte

    • by jbwolfe (241413) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @08:54PM (#43100367) Homepage

      Coupling this with the _1_ security measure that actually improved airline safety, putting locks on the cockpit doors (which does nothing if they don't actually lock them of course)

      While I prefer hiding behind the locked Kevlar door (it's on the pushback checklist), don't forget some of us are armed with Heckler & Koch's and instructions to shoot to kill...

    • by mutube (981006) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @09:05PM (#43100459) Homepage

      I'm not sure where the comment about the UK and knives came from, or the relevance of being an American male. Your military training might help (assuming you were trained for the situation) but it's not neccessary. In Glasgow, Scotland (UK) an attempted truck-bombing of an airport ended with a baggage handler and other members of the public confronting the terrorists and kicking the crap out of them (to be fair, they were on fire at the time).

      As you say, the game has changed. I don't think terrorists have a hope in hell anywhere in the Western world anymore. If I saw someone pull a knife, gun, bomb-vest in a crowded area I'd run right at them. And that's from a yellow-bellied, knife-fearing subject of her Hajesty.

    • by tompaulco (629533)
      You are correct sir. We would be safer on the plane if everyone were ISSUED a knife rather than forbidden to carry one.
    • by Cimexus (1355033)

      Interesting point about the way Americans mostly perceive knives as tools. Makes a lot of sense - I had to admit when I visit the US I notice a LOT of guys carry knives of some description. You would almost never see that here (Australia). Most people see them as weapons. In fact in many (if not all?) States you are simply not permitted to carry knives. For instance, in Queensland:

      Weapons Act 1990 (Qld):

      A person must not physically possess a knife in a public place or a school, unless the person has a reaso

  • Higher threat items, like explosives and guns and 4 ounce liquid containers and shoes.

  • I don't think I've ever seen a hockey stick used in a violent act. I'm surprised they banned them in the first place.

  • Every time we go through, they take wife's clippers from her. And every time she makes a big deal about it. And after the first couple of times, daughter and I sidle away from her, whistling tunelessly and staring at the ceiling...

  • That's about as much commonsense as they've used to date. Can we at least agree little old ladies and infants represent a small enough threat that we don't have to give them pat downs or full body scans? People don't realize it but the TSA haven't found a single potential terrorist, not one. So far billions spent and we get a goose egg for all the inconvenient and money.
  • Speed skate blades have never been banned for Carry-on air travel.
    [At least as far as I know - they were legal before this change.]

    And if you know anything about speed-skate blades, you know they're literally RAZOR sharp 17 inch mini-swords.
    They might not be as dangerous as a full-on machete, but pretty damn close.

    When I heard about ice blades being fine for carry-on - I was astonished. You can't bring a razor-blade or a small knife, but 17" clap blades you could shave with? Just peachy!

    The whole BS around

  • I shouldn't have to check a whole suitcase just so I can have my pocket knife or Leatherman with me when I travel. That's just silly.

    The old rule was something like 3 inches, or "diagonally across the guard's badge" (convenient measuring tool, that :-). Most ordinary pocket knives fall into that category.

    (and folding knives with locks are safer tools to use, resulting in fewer self-inflicted user injuries... *le sigh*)

  • Or any liquid in a larger than super-tiny container?

    I still remember going through airport security with a leatherman on my belt and not even setting off the metal detector.

    • by tompaulco (629533)

      Or any liquid in a larger than super-tiny container?

      No, the water ban is beneficial to all parties (except the traveler. Oh, and the environment). Due to not being able to bring in water from outside, and most people not wanting to pay $5 for a thimble of water inside, the airlines are able to keep the weight down on their flights, resulting in a fuel savings of perhaps as much as 25 cents per flight.Over an entire year and an entire flight, this probably adds up to a small amount of folding money.
      And then there are the people who do pay the $5 per thimble

      • by Jethro (14165)

        The sad thing here is I've actually been bringing an empty water bottle and filling it up past security. From the free water fountains. Sure, that's where they put the mind-control drugs, but hey.

  • and yet they STILL won't let you carry on RC cars. Fascists.
  • by Werrismys (764601) on Thursday March 07, 2013 @08:12AM (#43103397)
    What if you attach pocket knives to a hockey stick? The polearm poll yesterday lacked this option.
  • by LynnwoodRooster (966895) on Thursday March 07, 2013 @12:32PM (#43106159) Journal
    For the last several years, when I've gotten bumped up to business or first class (frequently), I've been supplied with real metal silverware. On an Asiana flight last August, I received a steak knife with a 5" serrated blade - and a matching butter knife, salad fork and dinner fork. All metal, all great weapons, all better than the 9/11 hijackers had.

    .
    No need to actually bring your own weapon with you - just book first-class and have the airlines hand them to you!

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