Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Government Earth United States Technology Your Rights Online

EPA Crowdsources Massive Photo Project 48

Posted by timothy
from the become-the-mayor-of-a-superfund-site dept.
coondoggie writes "Challenges from U.S. government agencies are all the rage these days and the Environmental Protection Agency today became the latest group to issue one: Take cool pictures of your surrounding environment to become part of historical record. The EPA's Locations Challenge looks to update a 40-year old agency project known as 'Documerica' which included more than 15,000 photographs of images of American environmental problems and everyday life. In the 1970s the EPA hired freelance photographers to capture images relating to environmental problems for the project."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

EPA Crowdsources Massive Photo Project

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 07, 2012 @04:57PM (#38625104)

    all the chemical plants and nuclear facilities, and behind government buildings where they leave the garbage. Then there's airports and other public places, they can be environmental hazards too. It could get cold being outdoors so much so I'll grow a beard. And while I'm down town maybe I'll pick up some fertiliser for my garden, or take my copy of the Quran back to the library. What could possibly go wrong?

  • by WoodstockJeff (568111) on Saturday January 07, 2012 @05:34PM (#38625306) Homepage

    The worse the pictures, the better. EPA wants reasons to increase its funding and enforcement efforts, but no excess budget to hire people to do it for them.

    • Which is fine, isn't it? Pardon me for sounding like redneck American (I am not even American), but considering that trillions of dollars have been spent on destruction, it would be could if some of that funding could be diverted to useful like monitoring and preventing environmental abuse.

      • Another use of this could be to take photos of the currently pristine areas that are proposed to be disturbed by oil and gas pipelines coming down from Canada. Give everyone a nice "before" record.

      • by byronivs (1626319)
        More like, "Cooter, let's git them fridgeraters to the bottom of the crick fore sheriff Lobo comes round!" Throws beer bottle into brush. Peels off in lifted Chevy belching hydrocarbons.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Well, vote for Ron Paul and the EPA will have even less of a budget then it currently has.

      Ron Paul: Idealist. Take that as you will, but I have my own opinions on him.

  • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Saturday January 07, 2012 @05:36PM (#38625310)

    . . . I call it my "front yard" . . .

  • by Anonymous Coward

    They arrive at between 9-11am, and leave between 2-3pm. At least a third of the offices are vacant or being used for "storage" throughout the day, but at least a third of the offices leave the lights on most of the night. Want to know how to cut the federal budget and improve the economy at the same time? Cut several thousand EPA jobs. Leeching hypocrits.

    • by Anonymous Coward
      Mod the parent down if you want, but he has a point. The average civilian GS is notoriously lazy and wasteful. If I ever assume power in the US, one of my first decrees would be to prohibit anyone from being a civilian employee of the government for more than 10 years of their lives and no more than 2 years at a time. That way they only lose so much of their work ethic. I'd also shut the revolving door between government and contracting.
  • San Joaquin Valley (Score:5, Informative)

    by Curunir_wolf (588405) on Saturday January 07, 2012 @06:36PM (#38625674) Homepage Journal
    How about I take pictures of the once-fertile farmland that the EPA turned into a desolated desert and drove 70,000 people out of work and out of the area? Think they would highlight that one?
    • How about I take pictures of the once-fertile farmland that the EPA turned into a desolated desert and drove 70,000 people out of work and out of the area? Think they would highlight that one?

      Um.... I'm no expert, but what did that farmland look like before humans irrigated it? And, what were the environmental costs associated with the irrigation project?

      • by Curunir_wolf (588405) on Saturday January 07, 2012 @08:02PM (#38626186) Homepage Journal

        Um.... I'm no expert, but what did that farmland look like before humans irrigated it? And, what were the environmental costs associated with the irrigation project?

        Well it's been irrigated since the beginning of the 20th century, with most of the infrastructure in place since the 1920's. So I assume any pictures of the area beforehand are rare or non-existent. The only negative environmental cost was in the early 1980's when attempts to deal with the raised water table by subsurface drains resulted in increased selenium levels which was too high to be tolerated by migratory bird populations. That issue was quickly dealt with and is no longer an issue.

        The EPA's concern was decreased populations of Delta Smelts in the San Joaquin river, which they attributed to the pumps. This connection was never satisfactorily made, but they made the decision to cut off the pumps anyway. There was no study into the impact of the Delta Smelt population, thorough investigation of the reasons for it, any effects that the reduction of Delta Smelts would have, or what the trade-offs were.

        The real issue is that when the alarm was raised to "do something" about the Delta Smelt, the usual suspects (Monsanto and DuPont) made sure that it was not their products, used extensively throughout the watershed areas for the San Francisco bay, and so another scapegoat was found. So their shills in the Federal bureaucracy made sure that the finger was pointed to the irrigation pumps instead. They irrigate land mostly used for orchards, where it's mostly small farmers that us a lot of migratory labor and significantly less Monsanto and DuPont products than the farmers in the bay watershed area that till, RoundUp, plant seed, RoundUp, spray pesticide, and clear-cut harvest every year.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    the smartest, most righteous, safest, most patriotic thing we can all do is not cooperate at any turn. our government has become a police state already. each new stage of this descent into totalitarianism is couched in the innocuous sounding requests for voluntary compliance -- only this time compliance goes further into actively helping them. let's not forget the two stunningly ineffective failed websites from the last couple years -- flag@whitehouse.gov and attackwatch@whitehouse.gov -- both of which urge

    • by GaryOlson (737642)
      I'm afraid I have to agree -- when interacting with government, no good deed goes unpunished. Any act of cooperation is eventually interpreted as voluntary subjugation.
  • Any time you have an agency that both discovers its own problems to solve and then solves the problems it finds will always find more problems that need solving. Just like the TSA, after the TSA was ramped up all of a sudden so many new places that were never subject to TSA searches all of a sudden became "weak points" discovered by the TSA.

    This is exactly like a crappy anti-malware program (which I consider malware in and of itself) that tells you about the "critical security threat found: cookie from
    • by Microlith (54737)

      the EPA is the greatest threat to our economy in our lifetime

      I know, if we don't let Job Creators and their Corporations pollute like they did in the prior two centuries, well we're just fucked.

      The EPA has dictated that they can only have 2 of their 5 stacks operational at any time.

      Can you cite anything related to this, or is this just a dubious anecdote? That said, it is near Los Angeles which has nasty smog problems as it is.

      There are at least two other examples in my life of the EPA causing massive probl

      • Can you cite anything related to this, or is this just a dubious anecdote? That said, it is near Los Angeles which has nasty smog problems as it is.

        No, as I said, a friend is a operator at the steam plant, I heard this via word of mouth not a news article. Is my friend lying to me? I doubt it. Running two stacks instead of whatever is most efficient causes more harm to the environment than if the EPA had not been involved, so the EPA is making the smog problem worse. And no, I have no citation. You c

  • RTFA (Score:4, Informative)

    by Phaedrus420 (860578) <phaedrus@nOspaM.gmx.com> on Saturday January 07, 2012 @09:17PM (#38626518) Journal
    Submission fails to note that they want pictures of the same locations as the original project. That does take a lot of fun out of the comments already posted, though, so, please, carry on.
    • Re:RTFA (Score:4, Informative)

      by _xeno_ (155264) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @12:54AM (#38627394) Homepage Journal

      Submission fails to note that they want pictures of the same locations as the original project.

      Plus, if you follow through to the collection of original photos you're supposed to recreate [flickr.com] you'll discover that they've helpfully sorted them by photographer, and not, say, location.

      Because who wouldn't want to sift through 15,000 photos organized by photographer to see if they can find one near them that they can recreate?

      • On the left side of the page in your link, there is another link to where they are sorted by location.
        • by _xeno_ (155264)

          Did you try using it? It goes to the National Archives website. Click on one of the states. Let's try Alabama.

          First result is "White House Central Files Subject File, compiled 1977 - 1981." What does that have to do with the Documerica project, done 1971-1977? Well, I guess they overlap a year. Apparently that's close enough.

          The next result is "EPA GULF COAST WATER SUPPLY RESEARCH LABORATORY, DAUPHIN ISLAND. STAFF MEETING, 05/1972" (yes, in all caps).

          Click through that, you get a very verbose description of

  • How about (Score:1, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    We send them pictures of the many ways the EPA fucks our every day life. 5 million pics of high gas prices on the way. I know those EPA terrorists think that the gas prices are too low for their plans. But why the hell should we make it easy on those bastards to wreck our lives?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I thought it was now established that the only ones taking pictures in public were; perverts, hippies obstructing police business and terrorists plotting attacks ?

  • You take the photos of environmental hazards and tell them where they are. Then they'll bring huge glass domes to contain those environmental problems.
  • The government has come through again and found a new way to piss away tax dollars.
  • Why would I want to help them rolling out their globalist affilated agenda 21, destroying my life, at the local city level.

    Fukushima hot particles in the USA vs No Burn Day (One is proudly on TV the other is silence) those aren't journalists! they won't tell you your home's air filter probably is a hot object, they won't tell you the daily readings, just the agenda 21 crap SMOG, Polin, Spare the Air Day, No Burn Day. What difference does it make if you have no job, no money, but you have firewood, and no

  • More and more of them want people to work for them for free. Fire the crew, and open it to the public to fill the void. Got pictures? Send them in! CNN did this. Although they wont admit to it. They fired/laid off and it looks like their ireporters are doing their jobs for nothing. Collecting environmental pictures is fine but I wonder how insurance companies will deal with the risk takers going after pictures in hazard areas? Who exactly will reimburse the ones getting the risky pictures if somethin

CCI Power 6/40: one board, a megabyte of cache, and an attitude...

Working...