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Akamai Employee Tried To Sell Secrets To Israel 172

Posted by Soulskill
from the nobody-does-it-like-nedry dept.
CWmike writes "A 43-year-old former Akamai employee has pleaded guilty to espionage charges after offering to hand over confidential information about the Web acceleration company to an agent posing as an Israeli consular official in Boston. Starting in September 2007, Elliot Doxer played an elaborate 18-month-long game of cloak-and-dagger with James Cromer, a man he thought was an Israeli intelligence officer. He handed over pages and pages of confidential data to Cromer, providing a list of Akamai's clients and contracts, information about the company's security practices, and even a list of 1,300 Akamai employees, including mobile numbers, departments and e-mail addresses. Doxer delivered the information to a dead drop box 62 times. His motivation: To help Israel and to get information on his son and estranged wife, who lived outside the U.S., prosecutors said in court filings. Doxer faces 15 years in prison on the charges."
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Akamai Employee Tried To Sell Secrets To Israel

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  • Tumbled (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    1) Find a an exploitable employee
    2) Seduce them with hopes of seeing their child again this century
    3) Collect incriminating evidence
    4) Profit!

    They'd be hard pressed to get a conviction out of me if they set this guy up. If he instigated this then I'll still be disinclined to convict as they could have smacked him down and gotten a felony.

    So this wasteful agent spent how much time and how many millions of dollars building up this whoop de do case? Maybe they could have nailed the guy with the simple felony,

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Jurramonga (1922438)
      Seems it would have been easier (and cheaper) to just help the guy get some information on his family. Less likely to get you a promotion, I suppose...
      • In addition to logic in the "when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail that you might get promoted for pounding" vein, I imagine that the FBI's counterintelligence office doesn't really want to court the potential moral hazard of providing assistance to people who might be moles in order to remove their incentive to sell out.

        There is, one presumes, a very long list of people who would really like something in their life fixed up, and you don't really want to get into the business of hav
    • Wouldn't that be the definition of entrapment?

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrapment [wikipedia.org]

      We also don't know the details of exactly how the offer was made. Of course, not that it matters now, as he's pleaded guilty.
      • Yeah, I don't understand how it couldn't be entrapment. What, do they have undercover agents sitting in places where peddlers of secrets will mistake you for a foreign intelligence operative or something? Yeah fucking right: you don't get approached by someone wanting to sell you secrets on accident.

        • by Artifakt (700173)

          It's obvious (always assuming that what the article says is substantially correct), that Mr. Doxer had what the law calls a propensity to commit the first crime from before law enforcement entered the picture. The FBI didn't have to implant any ideas in his head for that to happen. But, what about the rest of the crimes? This guy was apparently looking for a contact with the Israeli government from the start. Maybe that's so he could get info on the estranged wife and child, but it also arguably could be be

        • According to this Doxer offered, in an email to the Israeli consulate, to provide documents [boston.com].

          And the Israelis contacted the FBI. Some spy masters they turned out to be.

      • Re:Tumbled (Score:5, Informative)

        by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @09:59PM (#37261090) Journal
        Depends on the details of the start of the affair: "However, there is no entrapment where a person is ready and willing to break the law and the government agents merely provide what appears to be a favorable opportunity for the person to commit the crime."

        If the agent merely posed as the sort of consular person who the suspect was looking for, it's just a sting, not entrapment. If, on the other hand, the agent engaged in a prolonged campaign of grooming and cajoling to get otherwise upright and/or feckless people stirred up enough to do something, there would be a serious argument that entrapment was going on...

        It would be interesting to know if the feds just have undercover people swarming around likely defection loci, just hanging out and looking shady and approachable, or whether Akamai is considered cool enough to get investigations focused on its employees, or whether the fellow in question has something else that flagged him.
        • If, on the other hand, the agent engaged in a prolonged campaign of grooming and cajoling to get otherwise upright and/or feckless people stirred up enough to do something, there would be a serious argument that entrapment was going on.

          Well, pretty much anything can be going when you're engaging in wild speculation. The case is pretty well documented and there is no indication of grooming or Akamai arranging to have employees spied on.

          Anyway, let's get back to speculation. Maybe his wife was paid off by a rival of Akamai - knowing that Doxer in hus desperation would likely do something to harm is employer.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        "Apparently out of the blue, he decided to send an e-mail to Israel's Boston consulate on June 22, 2006, writing, "I am a jewish american who lives in Boston. I know you are always looking for information and i am offering the little i may have."

        Seems his mail was intercepted or somesuch

    • by Meshach (578918)

      1) Find a an exploitable employee
      2) Seduce them with hopes of seeing their child again this century
      3) Collect incriminating evidence
      4) Profit!

      FWIW he wasn't trying to profit. The article explicitly says that he was trying to contact his son and estranged wife.

      • by rthille (8526)

        Um, the "profit!" (along with all the other points) were actions the GP attributed to the FBI agent, not the "exploitable employee" (the guy trying to see his wife/son). Also, the article explicitly says he asked for $3000, and dropped the hint that he'd be happy if his estranged wife turned up dead.

        • It's clear the US government won't go to bat for it's citizens in these custody cases, especially in countries that allow dual-citizenship... A CRIME had already been committed and they were looking to take advantage.

          His plea to the government for help from a position like this is probably what got him flagged in the first place... There's some entrapment argument.. Guy should have volunteered to be a "consultant" ... Seems to work for companies sending the same tech jobs to Israel!! There's companies like

      • 'Contact' is one word for it. Using the phrase "His mother is a terrible human being and has caused me tremendous suffering. Not enough bad things can happen to her if you know what I mean." makes you sound like you do have a certain, er, mutually beneficial exchange of services, in mind...
      • Re:Tumbled (Score:5, Insightful)

        by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @10:04PM (#37261124) Homepage Journal

        FWIW he wasn't trying to profit.

        It's not about his profit.

        It's about the fact that the world would end in a fiery wreck if anyone should get faster video over the internet without paying license fees.

        We're talking profits here, man. What is the worth of a man's family in the face of lost shareholder value? Get your priorities straight!

        I'm telling you this as a friend.

        Plus, Akamai is an important part of the coming private Internet which is coming to replace the messy public internet. Don't you want a safer, more orderly Internet? And if Akamai's technology makes the new private Internet a "safer, speedier Internet" (as their marketing material says), obviously we can't have that technology falling into non-license paying hands. How can you have a "safer, speedier Internet" if a lot of people have access to technology that makes it "safer" and "speedier". That would be socialism, and you don't want socialism do you? Or do you, you filthy socialist? How would you like it if your family and employer found out that you were a filthy socialist who doesn't want a "safer, speedier Internet"? You wouldn't want that to happen. Bad things happen to filthy socialists who don't want a "safer, speedier Internet".

        • by Moraelin (679338)

          Right, right. Because OBVIOUSLY Israel couldn't figure out something like setting up a bunch of servers and redirecting to a different server. It's not like they're designing half of what goes into those servers.

          Try something more like customer data.

        • You know that Akamai's been involved in delivering most of the high traffic/demand content on the internet for over a decade, right? This isn't like a new thing. It's a thing that's been in place for about as long as most people have been using the internet.

          I don't know, at this point worrying about what it will do to the internet is like worrying about what those newfangled motorcars will do to our streets.

        • I'm sensing a tad bit of sarcasm here. Not sure. Either that or you're off your meds.
      • That list was from the State's perspective, so they (the government) would be Profit!ing.
    • by Moraelin (679338) on Wednesday August 31, 2011 @04:43AM (#37262714) Journal

      Actually, we had this story before, when they caught him. And no, there was no entrapment and whatnot. The guy is simply a flaming asshat, and he WOULD get a conviction out of me and then some.

      For a start, they didn't seduce him, he actually contacted the embassy on his own proposing to sell them some "secrets" they didn't ask for and didn't need. Those guys promptly tipped off the FBI.

      Second the whole "distraught father" and "patriotism" BS is just that: BS. I WOULD believe either of that if that were his primary motivation. It pretty obviously ain't.

      The first thing the guy asked for was money. He tried to sell his employers' customer lists and whatnot, for plain old money. And see again: there was no social engineering, no seducing him, bla, bla, bla, he actually went to what he thought would be a buyer and HE proposed to sell that stuff.

      When they told him they're not interested in paying for that, he basically asked that something bad happens to his ex. And I don't know about you, but trying to get a hit on someone isn't exactly a moral high ground any way I want to slice it.

      His son only entered his equation as an after-thought, as he just asked for some photos of him. It wasn't his first or second price, and, you know, it's not like he even wanted the son back or anything, just some photos.

      So, yeah, we have an asshat who actually goes looking to sell on his own, for money, and failing that, hey, maybe he can get them to whack his ex. Proving more than amply exactly what his morals are. Sorry, he's just scum, plain and simple, and more than deserves everything coming to him.

  • by curmudgeon99 (1040054) on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @09:23PM (#37260874)
    For several years I worked in Manhattan for one of those large privately held media Companies, one with both magazines and magazine websites galore, including ones you would know. We used to use Akamai. Sure they could cache our content and then absorb a lot of traffic from our servers, but they were expensive as hell--especially for what they did, in my opinion. I do seem to recall that our big company eventually dumped Akamai and all the money that went with it. Why they still exist I will never know.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @09:53PM (#37261056)

      Really?

      If not for Akamai, we'd need 3x the number of servers. Probably more considering certain things that don't scale linearly. That's space, cooling and power. Possibly more employees to manager the extra servers.

      Set up our own CDN? There's no way we could match the extensive network of edge servers Akamai has. And again, we'd have to employ people to make it work and manage these extra servers. Accountants too to pay all the different DC operators.

      We get some security as well. Our name servers can hide and Akamai can front any DoS attempts. Additionally, if we so choose (I believe) we could restrict access to our servers to -only- Akamai.

      Routing "strangeness" happens on the internet more often than you'd (well, I'd) think. With our local ISPs, we shrug our shoulders. Akamai it either doesn't happen, or in the rare case when it does, they "fix" it. "People from Singapore say our site is down" just doesn't happen anymore.

      No doubt, it's expensive (REALLY expensive), but it's oh-so-nice to sit behind Akamai and deal with problems that don't involve stupid amounts of traffic.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        CDNs are a nickel a dozen these days. Akamai has certain advantages - they're absolutely huge and thus have presence in the ass end of noiwhere - but companies that actually need what Akamai offers? Those are very, very, very few and far between.

        Everything else? DoS prevention? Restriction of access? You've just described every CDN provider, even the vast majority of the bargain basement, el cheapo mom-and-pops.

        Simply put, Akamai is the commercial Unix of CDNs. Good luck with that.

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          You are spot on. I deal with many CDN's and what I once admired about Akamai has now become a basic service.

          That all said Akamai holds a special place in my heart http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_M._Lewin

      • by Shinobi (19308)

        Akamai is a waste of space, especially when they appear to throttle access in certain regions, such as the nordic countries(And then they report low download speeds... go figure...), while other CDN's, like for example LimeLight Networks run full-speed here. On a good day against an Akamai server, I might get 1.5MiB/s peak on an 8GiB file.... Average day against LimeLight Networks, 10-11MB/s sustained on a 10GiB file.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      You weren't big enough to need Akamai. They have caching servers at ISPs. If a single ISP main office has multiple customers your application benefits.

    • by Alomex (148003) on Wednesday August 31, 2011 @12:45PM (#37266726) Homepage

      CNN dumped Akamai on September 10, 2001, for the exact same reasons as you list above. I kid you not.

      They signed back up on September 12, 2001.

  • by decora (1710862) on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @09:55PM (#37261070) Journal

    we have moved just about every last fucking factory to China, along with all of the computers that control them. Then we sent the manufacturing of those computers to China too. All of the corporations made massive amoputns of money off of this. Do you think the Chinese PLA just sat back and didn't study anything? They are pulling the same game they did on the high-speed rail experts they 'contracted' to build the rail system.

    And yet its all perfectly legal, because rich people are getting even richer off of it. Chinese workers arent getting rich - instead the government keeps the money and sticks it in Fannie and Freddie bonds and Treasury debt.

    oh

    but you want to possibly in theory sell a few secrets (like an email list... oh my god, how on earth did such a dangerous hacker acheive such a brilliant coup as an internal email list) to israel, which is a US ally... and youd think the world had come to a fucking end.

    the whole country has gone ape shit, back asswards insane. people are just fucking stupid anymore. no fucking sense, not a drop left. sell the entire manufacturing and industrial base to China, a communist government that killed our own 'brave men in uniform' in the Korean War, but theoretically sell a few tiny corporate "secrets" to Israel and you get 15 years in the slammer.

    how many secrets do you think are being funneled through our multinational corporations like , i dont know, chrysler? hummer? you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up? Why dont we put the CEO of hummer in fucking prison for corporate espionage... he didn't sell a few email lists, he sold the whole fucking company!

    Now don't get me wrong. I love China and it's culture, literature, people, etc. I'm just saying. Look at the fucking hypocrisy of these 'espionage' cases. Look who it benefits. the rich and the corporate elite. Look who it harms - the peons who want to give out information.

    Now, I know this particular peon wanted to sell information, for money. But that is not what precedents like this get used for in the future. He is the 8th in history. 8th. The 8th guy is prosecuted for selling info. The 9th guy is prosecuted for thinking about selling info. The 10th guy is prosecuted for giving out info for free. The 11th guy is prosecuted for journalism.

    That's the slippery slope of all this maniacal overcontrol of information, this obsession with secrecy... its not about secrecy, and it's not about protecting important information from espionage activity. It's about pure, blatant, bloody power, and who controls it, and who gets shafted. Espionage is a ruse. It's a red herring. The whole law is fucking corrupt to the point of banality.

    Bradley Manning is being charged under Computer Espionage. For what? For "leaking" a gunship video. You know how many gunship videos are on youtube right now? You know there's a website that specializes specifically in gunship footage, all gunship footage all the time?

    That's great. We now have three different kinds of Espionage - - - Plain old Espionage, Corporate Espionage, and Computer Espionage. How many more do we need? How many more can we invent? Well, just count the number of government agencies and power centers in the military industrial complex and then you will find out how many variations of thought-control law will be promulgated under 'national security'.

    Its all a lie. Everything we see here is junk. It's all junk.

    We have to save Toby.

    • by afidel (530433)
      I really shouldn't feed a troll, but you really think the 300 million people that have moved off of subsistence farms to move to the city in the last generation haven't become richer? Sure their life sucks compared to a middle class westerner but damn is it an improvement over breaking your back to barely avoid starvation with no hope of improving your situation.
      • by Kreigaffe (765218) on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @10:42PM (#37261354)

        Is it? Is it really? Do you know this?

        I sure don't. I don't know that farming in China is worse than living in "corporate cities". It could be worse.

        It could be better, but only because of social policies enacted by the Chinese government to ensure that they have a large population of workers desperate enough to take any work they can, a virtual slave class who are not allowed freedom of travel, who very well could have led a more happy and healthy and stable life as simple subsistence farmers. Of course, that wouldn't be as good for The State, so it's discouraged.

        Don't ever underestimate the evil of the Chinese government. Their population, to them, is not people but a resource. Look at their treatment of other resources and you will see how they will treat their people-resource. Its only value is to be exploited as harshly as possible for the benefit of the State.

        • by afidel (530433) on Tuesday August 30, 2011 @10:47PM (#37261378)
          Having worked on both a farm and in a factory for just above minimum wage, hell yeah factory work is a hell of a lot better, and I was on a midsized US farm with tons of machinery to help me out, not doing everything with hand tools. A week of doubles running a machine is still easier than working nearly as many hours doing manual labor.
        • by dbIII (701233)

          Is it really? Do you know this?

          Yes, and you can too if you walk down the street and talk to a former Chinese peasant. It's not as if they are hard to find no matter where you are on earth. I'm not saying China is ideal in any way and neither will they (they would have moved near you for an even better life), just that you are wrong.
          Also China is so big that anything you've every heard of it is probably true somewhere. Slavery happens as does every other crime you can think of, just as it does in the USA

          • The average city based Chinese citizens are making more money today but that is also creating rising inflation that even the Chinese government can not correct by manipulating their currency. This inflation is making their exports more expensive and damaging the only competitive advantage China has ever possessed which is cheap labor. China has went from trade surpluses to posting trade a deficient for the first time in almost 15 years. To add insult to injury they have also increased their food imports by
        • by CODiNE (27417)

          It could be better, but only because of social policies enacted by the Chinese government to ensure that they have a large population of workers desperate enough to take any work they can

          A real-life Chinese version of "The Grapes of Wrath".

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I lived for a few years in China, and returned to the US a few years ago because I still see some economic benefit to my kids in their growing up as native English speakers. Here some observations, although perhaps people living in China should reply, as I realize my view is still that of a naive outsider.

        The technical professionals in big cities in China live like US college students. Some have cars, most don't. They usually have TV's, DVD players, cell phones and sometimes older model computers. DSL i

    • by Anonymous Coward

      "you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up?"

      That's wrong. GM sold the hummer brand to a Chinese company
      http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/industrials/article6415642.ece

      What you are thinking of is the Humvee
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humvee

      which is still being made by AM General which is still an American company
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AM_General

    • by Anonymous Coward

      We may be allies with Israel but they also attract a lot of unwanted attention. Akami also does some work for the US government, giving reverse proxy destination IP's to a foreign government, ally or not, is a security risk - with the shit they are stirring up with Iran do you really think it would take long for that info to land in their hands? Besides, Akamai probably does a lot more than just reverse proxy for uncle sam.

      Your argument about hummers is juvenile and asinine. I'm hoping that was your poin

      • Since when spies (as in the one who contacted this crook) say truth about whom they really work for? It's in their benefit to be able to shove the responsibility onto someone else when caught. That "israeli" spy would really work for China or Iran... or, in this case, FBI.

      • i will admit i wrote it in the middle of the night on sleep deprivation. i did go a little alex jones / glenn beck there for a minute. i am sorry.

        but calling stuff like this 'espionage' is the true bias, and the truly misleading, hyperbolic bullshit. they put a guy in prison for fifteen fucking year for chrissake -- i get blasted as a nutcase, but these guys are perfectly rational authorities? look, this is fucking insane. we cannot keep doing this. its like saying 1+1 = 5, and everybody worried about the

    • A part of me agrees with you. A part of me is thinking "damn, I wonder if I could make his head explode...."

      In any case, the Chinese mostly just make plastic utensils and stuff, no great loss. It frees us up for innovation. And although the law does protect a lot of secrets, I'm more comfortable trusting those in the know to do the right thing than risk having it fall into the hands of terrorists. Industrial secrets such as are going to China don't matter as much because technology changes so fast anywa

    • I hate to get in the middle of your rant, but a Hummer is not a HumVee.
    • So commerce with China is bad, while selling private information to Israel is OK. Is that it? So because Israel is an "ally", means that selling people's phone numbers and addresses is just fine, and somehow trading with China is selling out to the "evil communists?"

      Why don't you just admit that you are only interested in what's good for Israel and not what's good for the US or the rest of the world?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up? Why dont we put the CEO of hummer in fucking prison for corporate espionage... he didn't sell a few email lists, he sold the whole fucking company!

      Um, wow, where to begin. Okay, how 'bout this... (1) Military HMMWVs ("hummers") are /not/ made by General Motors, who made the civilian Hummer and the laughable looks-vaguely-like-a-hummer-body-kit H2 (aka GM 2500) and H3 (aka Colorado). The military's M998 is, and always has been, made by AM General, which is still a U.S. company (Indiana).

      (2) The (civilian, cheesy) Hummer brand was to be sold to a Chinese manufacturing company, but the deal fell through. http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/02/24/us-gm-hu [reuters.com]

    • how many secrets do you think are being funneled through our multinational corporations like , i dont know, chrysler? hummer? you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up?

      Well, partly right - but also gloriously wrong. The company that manufactures the *Hummer* is indeed owned by the Chinese - but our troops don't drive *Hummers*. They drive *Humvees*/*HMMWV*- which are manufactured by a different, US

    • by Xacid (560407)

      Simple difference: intent.

    • by ScentCone (795499)
      You are wrong on basic facts, wrong on premises (which are mixed, and self-contradictory while also being wrong), and certainly wrong on the basic ethical issues related to whether a business owner does, or does not have a say in how information is sold. Basically, you're a rambling tin-foil troll. Get a grip.
    • by evilviper (135110)

      sell the entire manufacturing and industrial base to China, a communist government that killed our own 'brave men in uniform' in the Korean War

      Hmm, as opposed to our friendly relationships with Germany, Italy, and Japan (WWII was only a few years earlier). Through the 80s and early 90s it was Japan we were all afraid of, because they were taking all our manufacturing (becoming the #2 economy) and were going to buy out all the US corporations and take over.

      Even Vietnam is our valuable trading partner these

    • how many secrets do you think are being funneled through our multinational corporations like , i dont know, chrysler? hummer? you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up? Why dont we put the CEO of hummer in fucking prison for corporate espionage... he didn't sell a few email lists, he sold the whole fucking company!

      This is bogus.

      The military doesn't drive "hummer." The military uses HMMWV, which stand

    • by couchslug (175151)

      "we have moved just about every last fucking factory to China, "

      No. See CIA World Factbook.

  • The Uniform Trade Secrets Act makes trade secret "theft" a civil matter between the secret holder and the leaker. Apparently something went through in 1996 making it a Federal crime. The economy went fine for hundreds of years without the threat of jail for leakers -- why change? Especially since trade secret law can be and has been abused.

    On another subject, there's a gaping gap in the story as we've seen it. How did the FBI know about his email to the Israeli consulate? Why did it take years before they followed up?

    • That's what worries me. I mean, Israel is second only to the russians and chinese for technology theft, but...good grief. He didn't have anything of interest, so they forked him over to the feds to look like they don't Do That Sort of Thing...
      • by gl4ss (559668)

        well, didn't it turn out that they didn't want it?

        only one who wanted anything was the guy doing the leak, . and those secrets don't seem much like secrets, unless you're a recruiter.

        but 15 years? couldn't he have gotten away with manslaughter for less?15 years for imaginary totally undefined damages? and espionage wtf? it's simple enough to see if some company is using akamai and akamai is itself exporting the technology so wtf does the usa government have to do with it.. except it was the usa government w

      • so they forked him over to the feds to look like they don't Do That Sort of Thing...

        The lesson: If you have nothing to offer but yourself, maybe you should keep it to yourself.

      • by euroq (1818100)

        I mean, Israel is second only to the russians and chinese for technology theft, but...good grief.

        Uh, third?

    • by Anonymus (2267354)

      Seriously, this is scary and fucked up.

      Ruin him financially, sure, but to put him in prison for 15 years for handing over some information on the company he worked for is ridiculous. If I had to choose, I'd rather see him walk away scot-free (and be reunited with his family) than to serve any time in prison for this.

  • The article suggests that Doxer initiated contact, which is a solid strike against him and I think I agree with how the counter intelligence unit handled it because of that.

    Now if Doxer had been contacted because he had a known weakness, that would be a different story. That is especially true since his weakness was knowing the condition of his son and to dig up dirt on his estranged wife. In that case, I would be concerned about a case of entrapment and how it would be easier to resolve the situation by

    • But in these family cases you CAN'T even set foot in the country because the spouse flags you as a "stalker" and you're denied visas or turned away at customs. Unless you can get somebody in the other government to "accidentally" drive your spouse and child to the US Embasy where the FBI can detain them under the USA law that was broken you'll never see them again. You might also catch a break if the spouse leaves the country and your "friend" can get their plane grounded in a US extradition country for an

  • And once again, the Hague Treaty on abduction [wikipedia.org] is ignored. Is it because the absconding parent is the mother? Or is it to avoid ruffling the feathers of Israel? Do I fucking care which it is?

    Men, please, take the red pill [singularity2050.com].

    • by Elbereth (58257)

      That second link was hilarious. Thanks for the laugh.

      That was possibly the whiniest rant I've ever read in my life.

      • by hedwards (940851)

        It's a bit over the top, but it's completely true.

        Rape, sexual abuse, domestic violence, cancer, homelessness, those are all things for which society provides resources above and beyond what men receive. In the case of domestic violence, it's especially egregious seeing as women make up a full half of all abusers and yet are rarely targeted by public awareness campaigns.

        http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSPAT97046720080520 [reuters.com]
        http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2013743521_domesticviolence26.html [nwsource.com]

        Wha

        • by dave420 (699308)
          You sound like a lunatic. I have no idea what kind of fucked-up nonsense your schools are "indoctrinating" kids with, but that sure as fuck didn't happen when I grew up.
          • You sound like a lunatic. I have no idea what kind of fucked-up nonsense your schools are "indoctrinating" kids with, but that sure as fuck didn't happen when I grew up.

            It's typical Slashdot: weirdo loser creeps out the women around him and makes up all sorts of crazy conspiracies for why he can't get the physical and emotional fulfillment he craves. Sometimes they even go so far as to say women are inferior and use the oppression of the woman as evidence of her inferiority. It's quite crass.

            I can't identify well enough with his plight to explain because I'm charming, intelligent, and good looking, but I do know well enough to pity these nerds. Simone De Beauvoir discusses

            • by hedwards (940851)

              Care to provide an actual credible citation? The numbers that back my assertion are from precisely the same studies as the numbers that are deemed accurate enough to justify accusing men at large of committing domestic violence at a rate sufficient to call it an epidemic. If they're reliable enough when it's aimed at men, then why precisely are those same studies unreliable when women start to look bad?

          • by hedwards (940851)

            Unlikely, most folks don't realize that they're being indoctrinated. Chances are that you didn't know that the women's rights lectures were actually propaganda that were filled with half truths and outright lies.

            Those are credible sources and I have other ones. The sort of ignorance you're displaying is not uncommon, unfortunately, nor is it unexpected.

    • by euroq (1818100)

      LOL! Awesome 2nd link... :)

    • by Anonymous Coward

      it's because she's a jewess.

  • Mossad agents are walking all over the USA unchecked and unchallenged, thanks to their Jewish buddies who controls all branches of Government, Federal Reserve, Facebook, Google, Goldman Sachs etc etc.

    • Practically speaking, I'm not sure the US has much to fear from Mossad. Mossad only seems to be effective at revenge.... at least that's all we hear. Fuck with Isreal, they will go to any lengths for however long it takes to hunt you down and assassinate you with some Q-like device like an umbrella or lethal contact lens thrown like a Frisbee. Unless the US starts killing Israeli olympians, I really doubt they'll be taking any action against the US or its citizens.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        "Unless the US starts killing Israeli olympians, I really doubt they'll be taking any action against the US ..."

        Your personal doubt is not the sort of data which will convince an intelligent and impartial observer of anything relative to what Israel may or may not do to the US.

        The truth is, you don't have any idea what Israel would do, and your set of beliefs about Israel causes you to be childishly naive with respect to what you imagine Israel might do to the US.

        Israel doesn't give a damn about the US, and

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I knew there would be some paranoid anus who would make a comment like this.

    • With the above racist propagand set aside, the Israelies take their data security very, very seriously. I've met several gifted Israeli mathematicians whose publications were halted in the US for security reasons, due to the US laws on publishing encryption technologies internaitonally.

  • 18 months? 62 drops? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by hrtserpent6 (806666) on Wednesday August 31, 2011 @02:11AM (#37262222)
    A guy tries to sell inside corporate information to Israel in exchange for $3,000 and information on his ex-wife and son. The FBI gets involved, and they set up a sting operation. The guy then proceeds to provide some fairly weak-sauce information: client lists, contracts and employee information. The whole ordeal is clumsy and sad.

    How it should have happened:
    After a few transactions, the FBI realizes this guy is zero threat. They refer the case to the Massachusetts Attorney General "for further joint investigation". Based on the evidence, the AG charges the guy with larceny or embezzlement or whatever, Akamai takes their civil remedies for breach of contract, etc, and the FBI declines to prosecute. The guy loses his job, pays $150K in fines and does 6 months in minimum security + probation. His life gets pretty hard.

    How it actually happened:
    After a few transactions, the FBI realizes the information sucks. No source code, no proprietary technology, no M&A data, no insider-level financials. It's client lists, contracts and internal employee information. The information is so weak, they can't even charge him with anything under existing Federal statutes. But there's a foreign government involved, so all sense of proportion is lost. They keep asking the guy for more information. And more. 18 months and 62 transactions later, they finally get to a point where:
    • a) they get one or more specific pieces of information that qualify as 'trade secrets'
    • b) the data in aggregate can qualify as 'trade secrets'

    Now they can charge him under the Economic Espionage Act and prepare to drop him in a very deep, very dark hole. Slam dunk. Promotions all around for stopping a 'grave threat to U.S. economic security'. The guy loses his job, pays $400K in fines and goes to Federal prison for 10 years. His life is over.

    Insane.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      What do you expect? Law enforcement officials get paid and promoted based on how many lives they ruin. Of course they'll do their best to be as thorough as possible.

    • by Syberz (1170343)

      Yeah, but that evil man shared secret customer lists AND email addresses!!!1!one!

      It's not like he tanked the whole World's economy with junk investments, cost billions in bailout money and caused the unemployment of millions of people or anything...

    • by danhaas (891773)

      Sting operations are a slippery slope. It should be just a method to get good evidence against a dodgy suspect, not push him over the edge. Would he ever commit the crime if not for the sting? Certainly not

      How many gullible/desperate/morally dubious people have been unjustly tempted by such schemes?

      I don't have much simpathy for the morally dubious, but it is still a low, merciless blow.

    • by couchslug (175151)

      "The guy loses his job, pays $400K in fines and goes to Federal prison for 10 years. His life is over."

      That's called "deterrence". Once he INITIATED the process his life is reasonably forfeit as an example. It doesn't matter why he did the deed.

    • by Alomex (148003)

      62 transactions later,

      A good lawyer could make a good case entrapment.

      • LOL. Maybe if there was one or two transactions, you might argue entrapment. Sixty-two transactions suggest he was not an innocent victim.

        Not to mention, according to the Jerusalem Post, Court filings show Doxer e-mailed the Israeli consulate in Boston to offer assistance, saying that he is a Jewish American who wants "to help our homeland and our war against our enemies," therefore, it is likely that Doxer thought he was helping Israel.

        The idea didn't originate with the Feds, it originated with Doxer.

        • by Alomex (148003)

          What I'm saying is that if the first 61 transactions were legit, and the 62nd was not he could certainly argue that he was carefully led into breaking the law, thus entrapment.

  • I always thought Akamai was an Israeli company. I guess it's an "American company" co-founded by an Israeli.

    According to the Jerusalem Post, Doxer e-mailed the Israeli consulate in Boston to offer assistance, saying that he is a Jewish American who wants "to help our homeland and our war against our enemies," therefore, it is likely that Doxer thought he was helping Israel.

    The poor schmuck probably just thought he was carrying out company policy and making a quick buck on the side.

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