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It's funny.  Laugh. The Courts

Key EDS Witness Bought Internet Degree 258

Posted by timothy
from the maybe-the-dog-just-did-better dept.
An anonymous reader writes "EDS's key witness during the firm's court case against BSkyB was shown to have bought his degree online – but still managed to get a worse mark than a dog. Joe Galloway said he had a degree from Concordia College in the US Virgin Islands and gave detailed evidence on how he took plane journeys between the islands and attended a college there. But while questioning Galloway in court, Mark Howard QC managed to obtain exactly the same degree as Galloway from Concordia College for his dog 'Lulu' with one key difference – the dog got a higher mark."
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Key EDS Witness Bought Internet Degree

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:45AM (#30978250)

    My dog is smarter than your dog.

  • by Asadullah Ahmad (1608869) on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:48AM (#30978266)
    Its stuff like this that makes people question even reliable and accurate information on Internet.
    • by MrNaz (730548) * on Monday February 01, 2010 @04:26AM (#30978444) Homepage

      "reliable and accurate information on Internet"
      Best. Oxymoron. Ever.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Enleth (947766)

        Don't be so harsh, there surely is some reliable information out there. Of course, there still remains the problem of finding it, a process which, even with aid of a search engine, most closely resembles searching for diamonds in a septic tank with a single pair of rubber gloves and a ladle...

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          If you're looking for the definition of an eigenvector, you can probably trust what you find. Otherwise, it's like fixing a slow watch by never winding it: instead of being always wrong, it's now exactly correct twice every day.
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Bobfrankly1 (1043848)

          Don't be so harsh, there surely is some reliable information out there. Of course, there still remains the problem of finding it, a process which, even with aid of a search engine, most closely resembles searching for diamonds in a septic tank with a single pair of rubber gloves and a ladle...

          Woah...where'd you get the ladle?

  • Does it matter? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mwvdlee (775178) on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:50AM (#30978290) Homepage

    The fake-degree guy got fired from his job not for performing badly but for having a fake degree. What does this say about people who have a real degree that they didn't notice a difference in performance or at the very least that it took so long to find out?

    • Re:Does it matter? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ravenspear (756059) on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:57AM (#30978320)
      On the other hand, if the guy wasn't honest about his degree, how did they have any guarantee his work was honest?

      He could have manipulated someone else into doing the work for him or cut corners to obtain the result that was sought in perhaps undesirable or illegal ways.
      • by AK Marc (707885)
        It's easier to do the work at that point. Not to mention that most jobs are unrelated to the required degrees...
    • by jimicus (737525)

      The fake-degree guy got fired from his job not for performing badly but for having a fake degree. What does this say about people who have a real degree that they didn't notice a difference in performance or at the very least that it took so long to find out?

      Maybe they got their degree from an equally respectable institution?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by LKM (227954)
      Presumably, part of the idea is to discourage others from doing the same thing. If you have a fake diploma, chances are you know less about the topic than you say you do, so it's something that should be discouraged.
    • How do you know? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by CountBrass (590228) on Monday February 01, 2010 @04:45AM (#30978542)
      He single handedly lost the case according to the article. He knowingly gave false estimates to BSkyB the only point on which the court upheld BSB's complaints and as a result EDS lost the case. It appears the court decided this largely on the basis of his dishonest account of obtaining a degree (given in court under oath). So to say he lost his job just because he had a fake degree is misleading. He lied to his employer in order to obtain his post. He was sacked, I have no doubt, for dishonesty.
      • by Kr3m3Puff (413047) *

        Having read a good portion of the Judge's findings, lying about the degree, wasn't the only thing that the guy showed himself to be deceitful about. This wasn't just "he lied about one thing under oath, so here you go BSkyB". It was obvious that this particular individual could throw around lies with exceeding ease. Not a trait that is uncommon in IT Consulting. BSkyB just finally caught someone out.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by gad_zuki! (70830)

      So we should just be tolerating dishonesty?

      >What does this say about people who have a real degree that they didn't notice a difference in performance or at the very least that it took so long to find out?

      At every place I worked, the good people took up the slack from the bad people. Im sure the competent people there are looking forward to hiring a competent person they no longer have to babysit.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by GooberToo (74388)

      The fake-degree guy got fired from his job not for performing badly but for having a fake degree. What does this say about people who have a real degree that they didn't notice a difference in performance or at the very least that it took so long to find out?

      Far too often I run into people who have degrees, who know absolutely nothing. Far too often having a degree is simply used as a socially acceptable means to discriminate against those who do not. I've spoken with many who said I shouldn't look at it that way. Think of it as a character test to show who can follow through and who have proved they want something bad enough. When I ask, what about those who were excluded and are now actively punished because they had a broken home, a sick parent, minor legal

  • by Itninja (937614) on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:51AM (#30978294) Homepage
    Someone should warn the copious number [google.com] of other colleges with the same name to expect massive calls from nominally informed reporters and/or bloggers. I imagine there will be some college administrators getting some odd phone calls.
  • by Okian Warrior (537106) on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:54AM (#30978308) Homepage Journal

    On the internet, no one knows you're a dog.

    http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/gerv/archives/2007/images/internet_dog.jpg [mozillazine.org]

  • by mjwx (966435) on Monday February 01, 2010 @03:55AM (#30978316)
    The court case is appearing before the British high court.

    BSkyB and EDS are British firms, the collage in question is in the US Virgin Islands. This was reported by itweek.co.uk, itnews.com.au just copied the article so that doesn't qualify as an excuse.
    • by Kupfernigk (1190345) on Monday February 01, 2010 @04:40AM (#30978512)
      There is no British High Court: Scotland has a separate system of justice and it is the High Court of England and Wales. BSkyB is ultimately owned by News International, the multinational creation of Rupert Murdoch, born Australian but now a US citizen of convenience, and is British only in appearance. EDS is a subsidiary of Hewlett Packard, a US multinational. I will forgive you collage, because calling it a college would clearly be exaggeration.
      • by mjwx (966435)
        From the article. [itnews.com.au]

        In a landmark legal ruling, IT services firm EDS has lost its ongoing case with broadcaster BSkyB after the British High Court ruled that the HP-owned company had lied about its expertise.

        Google brings up the High Court of England and Wales as first result of "British High Court" so it appears we are victims of bad reporting.

        But that not withstanding, the jurisdiction is in England as that's where the contract took place.

        BTW, we Australians maintain to this day that Rupert Murdoch

      • by arethuza (737069)
        Indeed, the High Court (actually High Court of Justiciary) is the senior criminal court in Scotland, civil cases being in the Court of Session.
    • by Genda (560240)

      I just love looking at collages in the British Virgin Islands...

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Monday February 01, 2010 @04:33AM (#30978486)

    ...it really grokked Tail Recursion.

  • by Sits (117492) on Monday February 01, 2010 @05:06AM (#30978652) Homepage Journal

    In my RSS feed for this Slashdot article there was an advert saying "Online Master Degrees, learn more now". Strangely relevant and yet embarrassing at the same time...

    • by JustOK (667959)

      Why embarrassing? Was it you alma matter?

  • by HangingChad (677530) on Monday February 01, 2010 @09:43AM (#30980152) Homepage

    I always said my dog could run a better network than EDS. Talk about prophetic.

    One of the cardinal rules in IT is you never give EDS a working application.

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