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US Fed Gov. Says All Music Downloads Are Theft 451

Posted by timothy
from the bit-of-a-broad-brush-there dept.
BenEnglishAtHome writes "Nearly all US government employees and contractors are subject to mandatory annual information security briefings. This year the official briefing flatly states that all downloaded music is stolen. The occasionally breathless tone of the briefing and the various minor errors contained therein are funny but the real eye-opener is a 'secure the building' exercise where employees stumble across security problems and resolve them. According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!' No mention is made of more-free licenses, public domain works, or any other legitimate download. If this were a single agency or department that had made a mistake in their training material it might not be so shocking. But this is a government-wide training package that's being absorbed by hundreds of thousands of federal employees, both civilian and military. If you see a co-worker downloading music, they're stealing. Period. Who woulda thunk it? Somebody should mirror this. Who wants to bet that copies will become hard to find if clued-in technogeeks take notice and start making noise?" Warning: this site gives a whole new meaning to "Flash heavy."
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US Fed Gov. Says All Music Downloads Are Theft

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  • Non-Flash Equivalent (Score:5, Informative)

    by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn&gmail,com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:31PM (#29207593) Journal

    Warning: this site gives a whole new meaning to "Flash heavy."

    They have a non-flash site [disa.mil] if you need to complete this training and receive your certificate and you can't have flash. Not sure how they are running the audio but that's available as well.

    I gotta admit it's not as entertaining as the zoom down into the city flash animation when instead of that you get:

    Screen 1 of 48. Screen title, Intro. A block in any city, U S A. The camera zooms into a bank A T M. The A T M screen reads, no funds available. The camera zooms into another A T M, and again, no funds are available. Cut to an office in a building. Camera zooms into computer screen on desk. C N N website is on screen, displaying news headlines that support audio. Camera zooms to P D A on desk. P D A displays news headlines that support audio. Camera zooms to fax machine. Document on machine displays news headlines that support audio.

    Also, you might encounter some problems with words and acronyms that are pronounced like IA (Information Assurance)

    Screen 4 of 48. Screen title, What is I Ay? Image of worker at desk with computer. The computer monitor displays a warning ...

    • by reginaldo (1412879) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:37PM (#29207713)
      Thanks for the link, but I like the flash site. The website has audio, so while you are instructed not to download music (hey, spoken word is a type of art/music), you are in fact downloading music.

      THAT'S STEALING!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by amicusNYCL (1538833)

      Just to point out, this isn't a "Flash-heavy" site, this is an online training course (CBT = computer-based training). The vast majority of CBT courses are done in Flash, for a variety of reasons (animation and audio are two). The company I work for creates CBT courses, including for the military. The LMS they run on disa.mil is the Meridian LMS I believe, we have several of our own courses sitting on their LMS. None of them are publicly-available though, I'm not sure why this course is.

      It's nice that t

    • by Simulant (528590)

      "I Ay"? Why "I Ay"? (IA = Information Assurance, a government acronym for "network security", more or less) Did they use audio > text software? Wouldn't surprise me.

      If you really want to see what kind of bureaucracy we're dealing with, check out the glossary.

  • by Ozric (30691) <ozric&tampabay,rr,com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:33PM (#29207619)

    When is the last time they were right about anything? .. .. ..
    Can't think of one? Yea Me either.

    Nuff said

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Jeng (926980)

      My question is what are they being accused of stealing?

      The music?
      Or the bandwidth?

      I assume they are talking about downloading music at work.

  • by Ralph Spoilsport (673134) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:33PM (#29207625) Journal
    given that the only way you can get music from it is by downloading.

    RS

  • by KingSkippus (799657) * on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:33PM (#29207627) Homepage Journal

    If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing...

    ...of company time. And given that my taxes are paying these people's salaries (that is, you and I are "the company"), I'd really rather them not. Granted, I do wish that they would convey correct information, and I don't expect government workers to go zombie-like through the day without taking a break now and then, but still, I am glad that rampant goofing off in this particular manner is discouraged.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Darkness404 (1287218)
      To be perfectly honest, the fact that most of them are employed is stealing my tax dollars. It seems that government offices are quite fond of creating messes to create more jobs which just sap productivity and money. But such is the way if you don't ever need to make a profit and just keep leaching off of the masses....
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by gnud (934243)
        If _any_ government employee makes a mistake, all opposition politicians and media outlets might bitch about it for months (depending on who got fucked). So it's natural that a bureucracy evolves and more workers are needed because 60% of time is spent on asscovering.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by turbidostato (878842)

          "If _any_ government employee makes a mistake, all opposition politicians and media outlets might bitch about it for months"

          In order to avoid such mischieving government employees have develop the strategy... of doing nothing!!! This way nobody can make a mistake. Brrrrilliant!!!

      • by dangitman (862676) on Thursday August 27, 2009 @12:49AM (#29212441)

        But such is the way if you don't ever need to make a profit...

        Riiiight... because governance should be about turning a profit. The argument that that would be stealing from the people is a stronger argument than that tax is theft.

    • by squidfood (149212) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:48PM (#29207875)

      If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing...of company time.

      Many government offices have sane guidelines that include that the allowance of a strictly limited amount of personal use is permissible: e.g. occasional personal internet use. A (legal) song or two would easily fit under these guidelines. (whether you're allowed to have the software to play it on a work machine is another matter). It strikes me that this is a sane policy for any company.

      • by squidfood (149212)
        Here's a policy example I found by googling "[Agency] personal internet use":

        [Agency] personnel may use the Internet for non-official use (Internet searches, e-mail, etc.) provided:

        -Use does not adversely affect the employee's performance or accomplishment of the [Agency] mission;

        -Use is during non-working hours; and

        -Use does not reflect adversely on [Agency], e.g., does not result in any appearance of impropriety or unnecessary costs to the Federal Government.

    • by langelgjm (860756) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:52PM (#29207931) Journal

      If the summary is accurate, whoever wrote this needs an encounter with a clue-by-four. Let's not even bother with stuff like Creative Commons licenses or public domain recordings - just take the briefing at face value for a minute. All music is copyrighted; downloading copyrighted material is stealing; therefore, downloading music is stealing.

      Do they also not realize that in every Berne signatory country, all "creative" written text (i.e. anything other than raw facts), drawings, and photographs are also automatically copyrighted? So, using that logic, downloading any text or images is stealing. Congratulations, you've just made the entire Internet illegal!

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by 0racle (667029)
        I think you'd find half the internet IS illegal.
    • by phantomfive (622387) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:56PM (#29207987) Journal
      I read an opinion once that the reason the US government is so incompetent and inefficient is because we as Americans expect it to be. Since then I've decided it's kind of true, can you imagine working at a job where people are always blaming you for being inefficient, bad workers and lazy? Who would want to work there? Some people might, but then you get things like this. I am ok with not pirating music, but.........

      imagine if your workplace had a policy where if you saw someone downloading music, you had to approach them, then shout, "That is stealing!" Wow. Talk about demoralizing policy. I would feel like an utter tool. I mean, do I have to shout? Can't I at least say it in a soft voice?

      When managers start implementing policies like that, it's time to quit. What competent person would want to work for the government if they can work someplace nice? Some, I'm sure, but they are pushing a lot of good people out.
      • by Asclepius99 (1527727) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @05:42PM (#29208699)
        I think you're missing a far larger point. Have you dealt with non-government employees at a large corporation? When is the last time that you got them on the phone right away? And then did it take that one phone call to get stuff sorted out? Or did you have to make other calls? Possibly talk to a supervisor?

        The government is inefficient because it's made up of people working at a large institution that can easily pass responsibility to off to someone else. Why bother to make sure that something gets taken care of when no one above you is actually going to check or say, let alone do, anything if you don't get it done. When someone that's supposed to install your new cable line doesn't end up showing up after you wait for several hours and you call and complain, do you think the guy actually gets fired or reprimanded?
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by kindbud (90044)

        What competent person would want to work for the government if they can work someplace nice?

        They get an excellent health care plan and a pension for retirement. The private sector cannot^will not compete with this.

      • by DragonWriter (970822) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @05:49PM (#29208785)

        imagine if your workplace had a policy where if you saw someone downloading music, you had to approach them, then shout, "That is stealing!" Wow. Talk about demoralizing policy.

        If it was a policy of a nongovernment workplace, it would seem to present a cause of action as defamation per se (either because it imputes criminal action to the target or because it impugns the professional character of the target.)

      • by smellsofbikes (890263) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @06:12PM (#29209113) Journal

        I read an opinion once that the reason the US government is so incompetent and inefficient is because we as Americans expect it to be. Since then I've decided it's kind of true, can you imagine working at a job where people are always blaming you for being inefficient, bad workers and lazy? Who would want to work there?

        My sis-in-law works in the Federal court system as a paralegal, basically. Their enormous office building has exactly the minimum legal number of required bathrooms, and one drinking fountain, on the ground floor. When she asked why, she was told that if they put in comfy bathrooms and drinking fountains within a short walking distance of desks, there would be a huge public outcry about how gummint workers had cushy jobs and were too lazy to walk to get a drink -- which is exactly what happened when they DID try and modernize the building. So now she and her coworkers pay out of their pockets to get a Deep Rock water jug once a week. It has to sit on someone's desk, too, because they're not allowed to use floor space for non-governmental property. I'm glad the job pays her reasonably well because it sounds fairly hellish. I have a sink 8 meters from my desk, and our company pays for refrigerators stocked with free drinks, but that's okay because I'm in industry.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          This story is bullshit. Federal court buildings are fucking palaces - Congress can't interfere with the judicial branch by limiting necessary funding.

          Who has the final say on what is 'necessary'? THE FEDERAL COURTS DO.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Falconhell (1289630)

        Long in the past when telecommunicatios was a govt monoploy here, many people complained about Telecom workers sitting arounf at times doing nothing. At that stage 90% of repairs in the counrty areas took less than 24 hours.

        So we privatised. No one sits around now, and the waiting time is now more than 5 days for repairs.

        Every time I hear someone bitching about govt workers this comes to mind.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by forkazoo (138186)

      If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing... ...of company time. And given that my taxes are paying these people's salaries (that is, you and I are "the company"), I'd really rather them not. Granted, I do wish that they would convey correct information, and I don't expect government workers to go zombie-like through the day without taking a break now and then, but still, I am glad that rampant goofing off in this particular manner is discouraged.

      What if you are a government employee who

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Lord Ender (156273)

      How is listening to music while you work "goofing off"? I want my government employees to be honest and productive. If they are more productive while listening to music, then by Bob allmighty, I want them to listen to some damn music.

    • by ajs (35943) <ajs@@@ajs...com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @06:18PM (#29209213) Homepage Journal

      If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing...

      ...of company time. And given that my taxes are paying these people's salaries (that is, you and I are "the company"), I'd really rather them not.

      Yes, I agree. No one should be allowed to listen to music at work. For that matter, windows should be painted black and I can't see a reason for anyone below a GS7 to go without blinders in the office.

      Seriously, what kind of nonsense is this? If I do my job, I should be allowed to select whatever kind of silly thing I want to put on top of my monitor; adjust my chair however I want; and select whatever sort of music I'd like to listen to. Having a "pointy haired bosses must stay out of my way" attitude for "us" and then this kind of oppressive attitude toward anyone who happens to be employed by the U.S. Federal Government is absurd.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by gruhnj (195230)

      In a DoD environment I Tunes, Amazon Downloader, and other legal forms of downloading music are prohibited from being on the systems as being outside the baseline. I can only speak for the Army but the regulation does not consider music in general stealing. Quoting from AR 25-2 page 27 [army.mil]...

      (7) Certain activities are never authorized on Army networks. AUPs will include the following minimums as
      prohibited. These activities include any personal use of Government resources involving: pornography or obscene
      material (adult or child); copyright infringement (such as the sharing of copyright material by means of peer-to-peer
      software)
      ; gambling; the transmission of chain letters; unofficial advertising, soliciting, or selling except on authorized
      bulletin boards established for such use; or the violation of any statute or regulation.

      In short DISA wrote bad flash training on this one scenario. DoD 8500 series and agency specific regulations DO NOT refer to it as stealing.

  • Lol (Score:5, Funny)

    by jayhawk88 (160512) <jayhawk88@gmail.com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:34PM (#29207643)

    According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!'

    WTF is this, Dora the Explorer? Swiper, no swipey! Nice job, lame ass contract media company who probably got paid $10 million to create the worst instructional videos ever.

    • by Simulant (528590)

      Nice job, lame ass contract media company

      I willing to bet it was produced by a DOD employee. Be afraid.

  • I remember when I recorded my band in the living room and copied the cd to my computer. When iTunes told me I didn't have the required rights to make a cd copy I quit using iTunes.

    Is there an easy way to quit using the government?

    • by argent (18001) <peter AT slashdo ... taronga DOT com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:38PM (#29207733) Homepage Journal

      I remember when I recorded my band in the living room and copied the cd to my computer. When iTunes told me I didn't have the required rights to make a cd copy I quit using iTunes.

      I've been using iTunes for at least six years and I've never had it tell me I didn't have permissions to burn music no matter WHERE it came from.

    • You see, this is the fundamental flaw of a government that does more than protect against fraud and force. Theres no way to opt out. Theres no way to protest in a meaningful way, sure, march up to Congress with posters but in the end they still throw you in jail if you choose not to support them by paying taxes.

      With a private company, they screw you and you can screw them in the bottom line. If the government screws you either have to bend down for more or risk going to jail where they screw you more.
    • by djrogers (153854) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:45PM (#29207829)
      Troll - you lose. iTunes has never been capable of making DRM encumbered copies of CDs. Windows Media Player on the other hand has been capable of it, and in fact that was the default setting for several versions.

      All music ripped via iTunes goes into non-DRM'd MP3, AAC, or ALC (Apple Lossless Codec). Any or all of the above formats can also be burned back to CD by iTunes. in fact, even the old DRM'd FairlPlay AAC files from the iTunes Music Store could be burned to CD.

      • Yeah. That has happened to me with Windows Media Player. Itunes just aggravates me in small ways that aren't worth mentioning. Its not bad, but not the revolutionary piece of software that it was hyped as by my Apple loving friends prior to the windows version.
    • >Is there an easy way to quit using the government?
      Sigh. No easy way. After all, all ecologies develop symbiotic parasites, including social ecologies. So, you can move, but unless the local social ecology is sparse, you can't avoid an infection of government. The trick is finding one that's minimally pathological.

    • by hansamurai (907719) <hansamurai@gmail.com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:53PM (#29207945) Homepage Journal

      Is there an easy way to quit using the government?

      Shrug.

    • by Mr2001 (90979) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:54PM (#29207949) Homepage Journal

      Is there an easy way to quit using the government?

      Move to Somalia. It's a government-free paradise!

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Hurricane78 (562437)

        I think we should have multiple competing governments in the same country! In a way, one government alone, is an unacceptable monopoly.

        Yes, I'm serious!

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Orion Blastar (457579)

      Oh yes it is called immigrating to a different country. You basically vote with your feet.

      I told liberals that when Bush was president and I tell it to conservatives now when Obama is president, if they don't like it they can vote with their feet and move to a different country.

      Just that Canada, the EU, etc all have requirements for immigration like how much of a value you would be to their nation based on what degrees you have, what skills you have, how much you earn, etc.

      You cannot give up your US citizen

  • They ARE stealing (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Nickodeimus (1263214)
    The government's bandwidth, paid for by we the people. Quit wastin gour tax dollars you thief.
  • Would be all music, or all music except that music which is public domain, freely donated, given away as samples, distributed under a creative commons or similar licence, or prepaid for by some other means?
  • by pegr (46683) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:36PM (#29207691) Homepage Journal

    Well, in at least the whole music/copyright discussion. Here's how. The position is obviously childishly absurd, even to the most brain-dead government worker. It negates itself quite effectively.

    Unfortunately, it also negates the rest of itself as well, and I'd like to believe that there is something useful about it.

    Oh, and don't be in a hurry to connect to a .mil site... (just sayin'...)

  • Where I an employee under this program and a fellow employee found me downloading music I myself had created from my own server the correct response would be for them to yell "That's Stealing!" and publicly embarrass me?

    Would it then be correct for me to say "lawsuit"?

  • Slashdot editors, please put this story in "Your Rights Online", or maybe "Politics". Anything other than "Technology". I can find no interesting technology of note in this story.
    • What are you talking about? There is perfect examples of technology here! The lack of a real title in TFA, (unless master_iaa is somehow a real title), the total lack of HTML other than to embed in an ugly-looking flash plugin, the off center-ness of the flash object, everything just screams state of the art!
  • by dspkable (773450) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:38PM (#29207743) Homepage
    So what if the name of the song is "THAT'S STEALING!". Sales will skyrocket for that band.
  • This is what mindless bureaucracies produce and why I no longer work for the DOD.

    If it makes you feel any better, many (most, I hope) government employees don't this stuff too seriously.

  • Downloaded music should count as free promo. Record labels themselves follow downloads to gauge popularity. Someone should clue the gov't in on this.
  • by serutan (259622) <snoopdougNO@SPAMgeekazon.com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:49PM (#29207899) Homepage

    "Occasionally breathless tone" is an understatement. Take a look at some of the other training material. The whole site has a Reefer Madness tone, as if it was produced by the same person who directed anti-commie films in the 1950s. I wonder if government training material in general has been given the "War On [fill in the blank]" treatment.

  • It's basic sensationalistic everything is the worst possible case stupidity combined with Dora the explorer guidelines, RIAA false information, and a quantity of Shatneresce voice acting.

    For the most part, it's the standard dry government garbage that is used to give insomniacs some sleep time while racking up at-work hours.
  • I had to take the test, and I laughed as I got that question wrong, but no one cares. They hire a contractor to create a test, it's only reviewed by pointed haired managers, accuracy is optional. Just because it's there doesn't mean it's official belief, just that the agency creating the test put opinions down.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @04:58PM (#29208027)

    I've worked in the defense industry, with a security clearance, for going on twenty years now, and you have to understand, this kind of stupidity is not at all unusual. On the military side, the security officers are usually MPs (or SPs, for the Air Force) who've been dragooned into doing information security. They aren't stupid (well, most of them aren't), but they also aren't trained for that kind of work--they're supposed to be cops. But "one size fits nobody," so they get assigned by their branch to information protection slots, receive a couple of weeks of Power Point slide training, and then they're placed over engineers and techs whose knowledge of the IT systems runs rings around them. As a result, their response to anything new is hard-wired: "no."

    It's even worse on the civilian/contractor side. Security jobs don't pay well, and because you get what you pay for, the dregs of the organization tend to filter down to those positions. What's worse, once there, your average security guy/gal has power over smarter/more competent people for the first time in their careers, and a small but very present minority of them proceed to abuse that power and act arbitrarily, usually out of ignorance, but occasionally out of pure spite. This kind of mindless "training" presentation is what most of them do all day. As you can see, the results are less than impressive.

  • Whoever they hired to do the voice over for this obviously was having trouble keeping a straight face. The tone is incredibly facetious. Like "I'm saying it, but I really really really think this is utter bullshit."

  • I am totally going to go check them out by downloading their songs. If the government thinks they are that good to tell people to shout the band name I will give them a listen!
  • A coworker went off on me, for no particular reason, about not downloading any music because he would (somehow) get in trouble for it, in case the BSA raided our offices for (again) no particular reason.

    I downloaded a pile of public domain/CC music just on principle. Then I decompiled one of his "utilities" in order to remove a gratuitous pause he had added, just for job security. I felt bad about the latter thing, afterwards, but not the former.

    Some people are natural parasites, and can't grasp that other

  • by symbolset (646467) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @05:09PM (#29208191) Journal

    Copyright as envisioned by the authors of the US Constitution was written to law as the Copyright Act of 1790 [wikipedia.org].

    Under that act protection was 14 years with a 14 year extension available if the copyright holder was still alive and it was renewed.

    So... that's what they meant by "for limited times". They wrote it down for us. Under that law all works prior to 1980 would be in the public domain as would many prior to 1994. Every time copyright has been extended those works that would be public domain have been stolen from each of us. THAT'S stealing.

  • Strange (Score:3, Informative)

    by future assassin (639396) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @05:34PM (#29208577) Homepage
    When I got to http://www.bong-ra.com/ [bong-ra.com] I can download music for free from the artist. How would this be stealing? Unless they mean they might not get as many donation from music lobby groups unless they make the employees think downloading any music is stealing.
  • by Eil (82413) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @05:37PM (#29208631) Homepage Journal

    According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!' No mention is made of more-free licenses, public domain works, or any other legitimate download.

    When I was in the USAF, everyone in our squadron had to complete annual COMPUSEC training in order to retain their network account. Along with all of the other popular security myths, the training included a section where it instructed users to never, EVER install software from a file or disc that hadn't been approved by the network administrator. Now, this would make sense from a security point of view. We don't need bored airmen installing the Trojan Edition of Bejewelled on government computers. What killed me was that the ENTIRE justification for this rule was not to avoid a possible security issue, but rather that doing so might infringe on the software's copyright if a license to use it had not been properly purchased.

    In other words, the U.S. military was more concerned about accidental piracy than actual computer security.

    It should go without saying that there was never any mention of open source software, but I can sorta forgive them for that since this was a bit before open source became a common idea in I.T.

  • by HikingStick (878216) <z01riemer@nOsPAM.hotmail.com> on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @05:50PM (#29208821)
    The flame of the article is based on the phrasing of the general question. If you click the "Learn More" link, it is clear that the warning is about downloading via P2P file sharing networks. The use of P2P networks is a violation of the DOD Information Systems network use. That's the thrust of the training.

    It may not be clear from the phrasing in the question, but in the context (i.e., when administered to people who are constantly exposed to DOD Information Systems training and reminders), it will likely be understood by the reader. Chances are, there is likely a prohibition against personal software (including *legal* music downloads) too.
  • SlashFUD (Score:5, Insightful)

    by chrisG23 (812077) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @06:19PM (#29209233)
    Taken completely out of context and brought to a heightened level of irrational literal interpretation, the summary is accurate. However...........

    "According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!' The actual question in the slideshow/training abomination is along the lines of your fellow co-worker calls you over and says "look bra, I found a site with free music, lol im leet". There are 4 answers to choose from:

    1. I'd rather download the music from home - -email me the link. (I would choose this, and tell my coworker that he could get in trouble doing this at work, anywhere from wasting company time, committing criminal acts at work (if it is actually some sort of pirate site, and lets be honest freely available music is mostly (but not entirely) not worth my time) or at worst inviting security problems into the workplace computer.

    2. "Is it safe to download?" Umm, if you have to ask then you don't know already (or have a hunch at least) and are trusting some random Jim Bom on this.

    3. "Since we're on our lunch hour, I see no harm. HEre's my thumb drie!" Obviously the wrong answer with the thumb drive part added in for extra obviousness

    4. "That's stealing." Ok, so they simplified the answer from "that is probably stealing, who owns the distribution rights to these songs you are getting from this website? If the owners of the publishing rights do not consent to giving away these materials freely then a crime is being committed, otherwise it is ok to access this site but not from work, because of the above reasons".

    I took this.....I dont know what you'd call it, class, course, button masher until I get to the print certificate screen, because it was required of me where I work. Most of the info for securing information systems in this presentation is solid and correct for the USER side of things, i.e. things the everday user of a computer on a network can and should do to minimize (not eliminate as that is not possible) security breaches at their particular Department of Defense associated workplace. Now excuse me, I need to go participate in the lynching of my co-worker that downloaded the newest whatever is popular pop song at work.
    • Re:SlashFUD (Score:4, Insightful)

      by RoboRay (735839) on Wednesday August 26, 2009 @06:45PM (#29209631)

      I've also completed this requirement (I'm in the Navy) and remember the "downloading music" security scenario. I was just mindlessly clicking through as fast as I could to get to the "Print Certificate" button, but had to pause for that one because there was no correct option to choose. It's actually the only thing I remember from the entire course.

  • by paulsnx2 (453081) on Thursday August 27, 2009 @12:08AM (#29212213)

    I read through the comments, but can't claim I read every one. But of those I read, I didn't see anyone who pointed out that the guy in the training is showing you a WEB SITE...

    BUT all the answers are about the risks of P2P applications ?!?!?

    If you are going to a WEB SITE to download music, isn't the P2P application your browser!?!?!

  • Nobody cares (Score:3, Informative)

    by npsimons (32752) on Thursday August 27, 2009 @12:30AM (#29212349) Homepage Journal

    I work for DoD. I remember thinking about posting about this the first time I saw it, years ago. The truth is, nobody cares. Everyone where I work has headphones on and is listening to MP3s, either on their portable music players (not all are iPod . . . ) or on their computers. About the last damn thing we need our government security tax dollars being wasted on is a quixotic quest to rid all government assets of "stolen" music.

    It does sicken me a bit to see such propaganda bandied about as official government policy, but I figure if you aren't smart enough to know the difference between downloading data you have rights to (by fair use or otherwise) and an honest to goodness security breach, you shouldn't hold a clearance.

It is surely a great calamity for a human being to have no obsessions. - Robert Bly

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