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Crime United States

Kansas 'Swat' Perpetrator Had Already Been To Prison For Fake Bomb Threats (go.com) 315

More details are emerging about an online gamer whose fake call to Kansas police led to a fatal shooting:
  • "After phoning in a false bomb threat to a Glendale, California TV station in 2015, Tyler Barriss threatened to kill his grandmother if she reported him, according to local reports and court documents." -- The Wichita Eagle
  • "The Glendale Police Department confirmed to ABC News that Tyler Barriss made about 20 calls to universities and media outlets throughout the country around the time he was arrested for a bomb threat to Los Angeles ABC station KABC in 2015... He was sentenced to two years and eight months in jail, court records show." -- ABC News
  • "Within months of his release in August, he had already become the target of a Los Angeles Police Department investigation into similar hoax calls... LAPD detectives were planning to meet with federal prosecutors to discuss their investigation..." -- The Los Angeles Times
  • The Wichita Eagle reports that even after the police had fatally shot the person SWauTistic was pretending to be, he continued his phone call with the 911 operator for another 16 minutes -- on a call which lasted over half an hour.
  • Brian Krebs reports that police may have been aided in their investigation by another reformed SWAT perpetrator -- adding that SWauTistic privately claimed to have already called in fake emergencies at approximately 100 schools and 10 homes.

Just last month SWauTistic's Twitter account showed him bragging about a bomb threat which caused the evacuation of a Dallas convention center, according to the Daily Beast -- after which SWauTistic encouraged his Twitter followers to also follow him on a second account, "just in case twitter suspends me for being a god." Later the 25-year-old tweeted that "if you can't pull off a swat without getting busted you're not a leet hacking God its that simple."

Barriss remains in jail in Los Angeles with no bond, though within three weeks he's expected to be extradited to Kansas for his next trial.


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Kansas 'Swat' Perpetrator Had Already Been To Prison For Fake Bomb Threats

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  • Police didn't care (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jandrese ( 485 ) <kensama@vt.edu> on Saturday January 06, 2018 @05:16PM (#55876773) Homepage Journal
    This guy thought he was a l33t hacker because the police hadn't caught him, but it seems like the first time they tried they were able to roll him up in a few hours. He's an idiot with a vastly inflated sense of self worth, and it got an innocent person killed.
    • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

      The law enforcers went to the wrong address, the hoax call killed no one, incompetent law enforcers murdered an innocent person. The individual is of course guilty of a hoax call and should face consequences for those actions. Repeated offence, pattern of behaviour, all indicative of someone suffering from a mental condition and the sound consequences should be compulsory medical treatment, if necessary, for the rest of their lives. The law enforcers who went to the wrong address and murdered someone should

      • by Koby77 ( 992785 )
        Under felony murder laws, you can be charged with murder if you engage felony activity that is inherently dangerous, such as phoning in a hoax hostage situation, even if you're not the one who directly caused the death. Simply causing a dangerous situation is enough to make you responsible.

        https://www.justia.com/crimina... [justia.com]

        And it is my understanding that in Kansas, phoning in a hostage hoax is considered a felony. The police officer(s) involved in the fatality will legally be able to pin the blame on th
      • Since everything else that transpired in Topeka hinges on the prank call, the party making that call is the responsible party.

        "SWauTistic" should be found guilty of murder by cop.

        End of story.

        • Since everything else that transpired in Topeka hinges on the prank call, the party making that call is the responsible party.

          Absolutely not. The point of no return was the pulling of the trigger.

          That doesn't absolve them of any responsibility. It seems equivalent to being an accessory to murder, to me. But the phone call is not the murder itself.

  • by Chris Mattern ( 191822 ) on Saturday January 06, 2018 @05:23PM (#55876793)

    In 2015. So why isn't he still behind bars?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 06, 2018 @05:36PM (#55876861)

    This is all fine and good but maybe lets discuss the innocent civilians literally killed by police for no reason? Over-response much? "To protect?" LOL, you mean "target pratice?" Just look at the facts, being a police officer is one of the SAFEST jobs in America but because they have been brainwashed and have triggers on guns they are the MOST dangerous people in the world.

    These paranoid lunatics kill who knows how many regular innocent people and while some of it makes news, most of it is covered up.

    It's time to discuss whether a military response is necessary for common household domestic matters.

    • I truly hope taking hostages isn't and never becomes a "common household domestic matter".

    • > LOL, you mean "target pratice?" Just look at the facts, being a police officer is one of the SAFEST jobs in America

      No. It was N10 on the list in 2010

      https://www.thebalance.com/how... [thebalance.com]

      • No. It was N10 on the list in 2010

        Saying it is among the safest professions in the country is dumb, but it's usually not even on the top ten list and that it made it there in 2010 wasn't because of a spike in killings of officers, either. It's behind traditionally tragically under-appreciated and underpaid (same thing in capitalism) jobs like maintenance man, for example. Cops get 1.5-2 times what those guys get paid, but they're at a far lower risk of death on the job. Besides the usual risks of things like falling or electrocution, mainte

  • by mi ( 197448 ) <slashdot-2017q4@virtual-estates.net> on Saturday January 06, 2018 @07:02PM (#55877197) Homepage Journal

    Ok, so this punk will get the punishment he richly deserved long before an innocent man was killed.

    Now, can we go back to punishing the actual killer — the cop, who pulled the trigger? Unlike certain Michael Brown [washingtonpost.com], this victim really was raising his hands. Why was he shot at? Why will not you and me be shot at in the same situation?

    It sure seems like police are trying to throw all of the responsibility on the prankster, the better to protect one of their own... We should not allow that to happen.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 06, 2018 @07:58PM (#55877437)

      It sure seems like police are trying to throw all of the responsibility on the prankster, the better to protect one of their own

      Yeah. It's hard not to think that the actual police office on the actual scene with the actual gun in his hand has to bear some responsibility for actually saying does any of what I actually see merit deadly force?

      From what I've seen, than answer would have to be no. I fail to see how this is a clean shoot, but maybe some of the details are eluding me.

  • This douchebag just needs to go to prison for a long time....or perhaps just forever. It's clear the first experience did not have the desired effect.

  • by gweihir ( 88907 ) on Saturday January 06, 2018 @09:08PM (#55877685)

    There, they will get released after a while, unless they manage to do something really large. People like this one need to go under permanent supervision. At the same time, it can rightfully be said that this person is insane and hence prison is again not the right place, as punishment will accomplish exactly nothing. (Yes, I do understand that prison in the US is about revenge and economic incentives, not punishment. But unless the US stops using the mind-set of a stone-age primitive here, problems like this will not get solves and will continue to cause significant damage to society.)

    • So the alternative, I suppose, would be involuntary commitment to a mental health hospital?

      The problem with this is, once a person begins treatment in such a facility, and no longer shows symptoms of insanity (once medicine starts to have an effect), the patient is released. Once released, such patients often stop taking their medicine, and relapse, and return to their insane and/or violent behavior.

      So unless the laws are changed to require involuntary commitment for a term equivalent to what a prison sente

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