Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Crime Transportation Idle

Stolen Car Recovered With 11,000 More Miles -- and Lyft Stickers (sfgate.com) 119

The San Francisco Bay Area has more car thefts than any region in America, according to SFGate.com. A National Insurance Crime Bureau report found that between 2012 and 2014, there were an average of 30,000 car thefts a year just in the cities of San Francisco, Oakland and Hayward. But one theft took a strange turn. An anonymous reader quotes their report: Cierra and Josh Barton purchased a new Honda HR-V at the beginning of summer. It was stolen while parked in front of their Livermore apartment complex at the end of August. Four months later, Hayward police called the Bartons to say they had recovered the vehicle... What they found, to their surprise, was a car in relatively good shape -- a few dents, a rattling hood. But in the back and front windows were Lyft stickers, Cierra Barton said.

The odometer had spiked from 2,000 miles to more than 13,000. And in the back seat, Cierra said she found a pillow, a jacket and a stuffed animal. "It wasn't burned out, it wasn't gutted, but it appeared to be have been used as a Lyft," she said. That, Cierra added, was even worse than she imagined. "Not only did someone steal our car, they made money off it!"

Lyft says that "Given the information provided, we are unable to match this vehicle to any Lyft accounts in the area," adding they "stand ready to assist law enforcement in any investigation."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Stolen Car Recovered With 11,000 More Miles -- and Lyft Stickers

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 17, 2017 @05:05PM (#55757555)

    Lyft driving is profitable only if you steal cars.

    Just like Bitcoin mining is profitable only if you steal electricity.

    Captcha: coinage

  • by fustakrakich ( 1673220 ) on Sunday December 17, 2017 @05:06PM (#55757559) Journal

    It was a self driving car, and it got bored...

  • whaat? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 17, 2017 @05:08PM (#55757571)

    "Not only did someone steal our car, they made money off it!"

    Is it not usually understood that is why they are stealing your car? For some sort of profit. Oh sure the occasional joy ride here and there but most of the time chopped into little pieces or sold of in another country. Using it for a taxi is a new twist.

    • by Bert64 ( 520050 )

      There have been cases of long term valet parking services using the cars as rentals, taxis or joyrides too... People have received speeding or parking tickets when they were out of the country.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    It was a sophisticated PR smear by Uber. They are trying to hurt Lyft with a thousand cuts.

    captcha: keenness

    • Why not make a service that passes app based jobs to the local cab companies?

      Multinational tax dodging venture companies are ten a penny, no matter how catchy their names.
      Local companies all have CC processing, GPS location of cars, ordering on the app and all that novelty stuff that keeps the kids using Oobah.

      Plus, local companies didn't keep a hack of 57,000,000 people's accounts quiet for over a year by paying a silly sum of $100,000 and an NDA for the pleasure of false security LOLOLOLOL
      Jus' sayin
  • by Anonymous Coward

    "It wasn't burned out, it wasn't gutted, but it appeared to be have been used as a Lyft," she said. That, Cierra added, was even worse than she imagined. "Not only did someone steal our car, they made money off it!"

    What the heck did she imagine people steal cars for? And burning it out and/or gutting it would have been better than using it to transport people? Because Americans prefer vandals to the poor?

    What is wrong with you people?

    • If they burned it out she'd probably get a new car from the insurance, but with it only having been used she only gets a tiny bit, but it actually had a lot of heavy use put on it.

      Also, sometimes cars are stolen and driven around a few weeks, and then sold for parts. What doesn't have value might get burned. Or if they don't have a way to sell the parts, and just wanted to drive it around, they might burn it to destroy evidence.

    • by Bert64 ( 520050 )

      Burning it out means her insurance will supply her a replacement car or cash...
      Returning it with added mileage and damage means she gets back a lower value vehicle than she had before.

  • My theory (Score:5, Interesting)

    by 140Mandak262Jamuna ( 970587 ) on Sunday December 17, 2017 @05:35PM (#55757669) Journal
    A Lyft drive's car broken down. Despo guy stole a car, ran it for 11,000 miles and made enough money to repair his car and then abandoned it after making enough to repair his regular car.

    Under these circumstances, would the guy have to steal the same model, make and color? Then we can narrow down the suspects list.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I wouldn't be surprised if this story ends up being like Fight Club: the guy had a psychotic break, stole his own car, and started driving for Lyft at night. They should start by examining him for cuts and bruises. :)

    • by Mashiki ( 184564 )

      Could actually be worse then that. She could actually have the thief's car, one of the more interesting problems we're seeing up here in Canada is VIN swapping. Where car thieves take a VIN off a vehicle marked as totaled/non-recoverable then put it onto a car that's been stolen. It wouldn't surprise me if the dashboard VIN doesn't match the engine/sub-frame VIN's. Those are really the only ones you can trust.

  • Just wow (Score:5, Funny)

    by Krishnoid ( 984597 ) on Sunday December 17, 2017 @05:44PM (#55757695) Journal

    And in the back seat, Cierra said she found a pillow, a jacket and a stuffed animal. "It wasn't burned out, it wasn't gutted, but it appeared to be have been used as a Lyft," she said.

    Definitely the behavior and accoutrements of an irresponsible joyrider.

    That, Cierra added, was even worse than she imagined. "Not only did someone steal our car, they made money off it!"

    Those monsters! Probably some affluenza-infected trust fund kid who slept in the back of the car with their only item of comfort from their horrible parents ... ok, I'm losing the narrative here.

    Seriously, someone who has to drive for Lyft to make money and sleep in the back of their car with a stuffed animal for comfort, and it's the *making money* part that's even worse than she imagined? I'm ready to put in for this thief's gofundme to buy their own HR-V (which runs around ~20k, apparently).

    • It looks like a homeless guy was using the car as shelter and a way to get food.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Not only did someone steal our car, they made money off it!"

    What happens with stolen goods normally, for $200, Alex?

  • How much does Lyft know about the drivers' actual vehicle as opposed to what the driver tells Lyft?
    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      How much does Lyft know about the drivers' actual vehicle as opposed to what the driver tells Lyft?

      Well, that information is what Lyft tells fares - since Lyfts and Ubers are not uniformly painted and distinctive (like taxis), you need to know what car the driver drives so you can catch your ride. Maybe even a photo, if it's a lesser known vehicle.

      For a while, you had a pink thing on the front of your vehicle to help identify it, but I guess it's not used anymore.

  • Its a modern car, it spie^^stores logs.

  • A stolen and unrecovered car is easy. The insurance company totals it and pays out.

    A stolen car recovered but damaged is easy. Insurance company figures out how much it would cost to repair the damage, and pays that.

    A stolen car recovered which has only been depreciated by logging 11,000 miles? How do you calculate that? Depreciation is not fixed per mile. Depreciation from 2,000 to 13,000 miles is a lot more than depreciation from 42,000 to 53,000 miles, even though both are 11,000 miles worth o
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The insurance company probably already paid the claim after four months. In that case they'd typically allow the original owner to buy it back (unlikely since they probably bought some other car by now) and, failing that, the insurance company would now own the car with a salvage title. It'll likely go to auction and might end up at a low end used car lot or parted out. Not too different from the fate of your average stolen car after all.

  • In other news, Law enforcement were asked how it's possible for a stolen car to drive 11,000 miles around town without being spotted. Number plate recognition vendors were contacted, but none responded to our requests.

  • "Not only did someone steal our car, they made money off it!"

    Riiight. They should have stolen the car and donated it to a charity, that would have been better.

    Imagine, being so selfish as to steal a car in hopes of turning a profit on the crime! Perhaps they should instead consider themselves as job creators, not crime victims. Personally I'm impressed the thief was that industrious, opting ot use the car rather than sell it to a chop shop.

  • they both peppered their fleets with stolen cars, hidden until safe to drive, they got it down to a science and now it is going to take even better science to bust them at it
  • To be frank, for some time now, i have being using General Insurance for my car insurance. The rate is reasonable and they absolutely helped me when i need to make/choose my insurance policy. The actual best i can say is that, the company i a reliable one. Am very happy i made the choice right. You can visit the company in https://generalinsurance.com/ [generalinsurance.com] . I recommend it to every one.

The trouble with opportunity is that it always comes disguised as hard work. -- Herbert V. Prochnow

Working...