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Piracy Sci-Fi Television Entertainment

Star Trek: Discovery Nearly Cracks Pirate Bay's Top 10 In Less Than 24 Hours (ew.com) 390

Yesterday was the season premiere of the first new Star Trek TV series in 12 years. While the first episode aired on the CBS broadcast network Sunday night, the second episode -- and all the rest to come -- was made available exclusively on the CBS All Access streaming service for $6 a month. Naturally, this upset Trekkies and led many of them to find alternative methods to watch the show. EW reports that Star Trek: Discovery "is on the verge of cracking Pirate Bay's Top 10 most illegally downloaded shows in less than 24 hours." From the report: The Discovery pilot is currently at No. 11 on the list (apparently at No. 15 just a few hours ago), the pilot is up there with the likes of HBO's Game of Thrones, Adult Swim's Rick and Morty and, for some reason, TNT's The Last Ship. The show's second episode is at No. 17, which is a tad surprising as that was the one that wasn't free. Ever since the distribution plan was first announced fans have resisted with some vehemence the idea of paying for "yet another streaming service just to watch a single show" (there's more than one show on All Access, CBS is quick to point out, and then a debate over the relative merits of NCIS and MacGyver repeats ensues).
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Star Trek: Discovery Nearly Cracks Pirate Bay's Top 10 In Less Than 24 Hours

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  • by mutantSushi ( 950662 ) on Tuesday September 26, 2017 @03:30AM (#55264427)
    Can't help but notice the dislike of the "single producer streaming source" essentially conflicts with the quite-recent desire for "ala carte" cable without enforced packages. Not clear what is horrible about sub'ing the producers of content one watches at any one moment, and switching those around when one's viewing preferences change. Personally I'm not much of a TV watcher so am not in market for this, but seems strange complaint given the population who does want paid TV content.

    re: the show, can't say it interests me, I am more the sort who wants to see time-line furthered post DS9, rather than re-hash original Trek timeline. And fuck Kirk, Sisko was King. :-)
    • Pretty sure CBS is positioning this to be one of the numerous streams you subscribe to on your Apple TV, thereby participating in the "a la carte" ecosystem.

      And you are mistaken, Kirk was the Bomb. I mean other than Picard, of course.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      A la carte would be more like The Pirate Bay. Has everything, pick what you want and pay a reasonable fee for it. Ideally a flat monthly fee but per episode might be okay too, as long as it's not silly prices (hi Amazon, I'm not paying 2.99 per episode of Dexter, maybe 0.10).

    • Can't help but notice the dislike of the "single producer streaming source" essentially conflicts with the quite-recent desire for "ala carte" cable without enforced packages.

      What is replacing cable is certainly not "ala carte" by any means.

      Example: I want to view exclusive content on Netflix. So now, I have to pay them for that right while ignoring the other 90% of content they offer that I have zero interest in. Tell me again how that is any different than being forced to pay for 200 cable channels I'll never watch in order to get access to desired content? Rinse and repeat this stupidity for the other dozen "exclusive content" providers, with more on the way.

      In the end, co

    • by nine-times ( 778537 ) <nine.times@gmail.com> on Tuesday September 26, 2017 @05:57AM (#55264869) Homepage

      Can't help but notice the dislike of the "single producer streaming source" essentially conflicts with the quite-recent desire for "ala carte" cable without enforced packages.

      I think you might be misunderstanding the complaint about wanted "a la carte" cable. The precise problem isn't that they have too many channels available to them. The problem is that the price of cable packages are high and rising, and people are saying, "If I'm paying $120 for 500 channels with thousands of shows, but I only watch 20 shows on 4 of those channels. Why can't I save some money by only getting the shows and channels I want?"

      So now the content owners are saying, "Oh, you want a la carte, do you? Ok. We'll take those 20 shows that you want, put them each on a different streaming service. We'll charge $10/month for each service, and then in order to justify that price, we'll pack the service with a bunch of other shows that you don't care about. That's what you want, right?"

      But no, having a la carte cable wasn't the goal, it was the means. The goal was to save money without losing access to the shows they want to watch. The idea was that maybe they could save money by sacrificing access to the crap they don't want. It doesn't help to give them a new distribution model that finds a different way to bundle crap we don't want, that ends up costing even more when you add it all up.

    • Can't help but notice the dislike of the "single producer streaming source" essentially conflicts with the quite-recent desire for "ala carte" cable without enforced packages.

      In cable television, a la carte reasonably refers to the practice of being able to purchase access to channels, because that's how cable television is organized; channels, and bundles of channels. In internet "television", a la carte reasonable refers to the practice of being able to purchase access to episodes; not only because this is how we're used to handling digital media, but also because this is how digital media has traditionally been sold.

      Unfortunately, DRM really ruins that. You have to trust that

  • by Maxo-Texas ( 864189 ) on Tuesday September 26, 2017 @04:05AM (#55264581)

    A show like this is going to be too hot. Anyone downloading without using a VPN client is risking a $3,000 fine and possible loss of their internet connection.

    I like star trek. But I'm simply not going to watch it.

    I have too many other forms of entertainment anyway.

    If it's good- perhaps it will be available thru less expensive or less risky delivery methods.

    • Anyone downloading without using a VPN client is risking a $3,000 fine and possible loss of their internet connection.

      Maybe in USA. Everyone else in the world can watch it via Netflix - it's streaming, not free-to-air, so it has to be downloaded to be watched.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Anyone NOT downloading it risks a $3000 "fine". Those companies are incompetent, they just send threats to random people and hope they don't contest it.

    • Anyone downloading without using a VPN client is risking a $3,000 fine and possible loss of their internet connection.

      Under the rule of which draconian dictator?

  • "The show's second episode is at No. 17, which is a tad surprising as that was the one that wasn't free".

    You're forgetting about the "Rest of the world" -- that massive populous outside of the U.S. of A (which is only about 22 times the population of the USA, so probably doesn't register for you) that don't have CBS (and probably many in the US that also don't have access to CBS), and thus have no other way to view the pilot. It makes sense to me that more people will download the pilot to watch before dow

  • Was able to watch it on Netflix, so it seems that Netflix secured the streaming for some countries.
  • Pretty useless to link articles without linking the actual top10: http://uj3wazyk5u4hnvtk.onion/... [uj3wazyk5u4hnvtk.onion]
    (alternate link may also work: https://thepiratebay.org/top/2... [thepiratebay.org] )

    It's at the 6th place at the moment.

  • by dywolf ( 2673597 ) on Tuesday September 26, 2017 @06:55AM (#55265105)

    Last Ship is a fun show.

  • What bothered me most was the ungloved fist-like introduction of the characters. And all of them, without fail, stereotypes. Hello, I'm the nonstandard captain. Hello, I'm the faithful sidekick. Hello, I'm the nonbinary genderfluid ... well, that has to suffice for a character. Hello, I'm the alien.

    That's not characters. You could get away with that in a TV show in the 1950s where the Indian was the Indian and the Cowboy was the Cowboy, but PLEASE, TV writing went a wee bit further by now. Who the heck desi

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