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EU Government Privacy United Kingdom

UK 'Emergency' Bulk Data Slurp Permissible In Pursuit Of 'Serious Crime' (theregister.co.uk) 48

An anonymous reader writes: Bulk collection of data from phone calls and emails by carriers acting under government orders could be permissible in the pursuit of 'serious crime'. That's the preliminary ruling in a case brought by Brexit chief minister David Davis against PM Theresa May before the European Union's highest court. The ruling suggests bulk collection and retention of customer data might not be in breach of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights -- if it's done legally and with safeguards. Davis with Labour Party deputy leader Tom Watson and others brought their case to the European Court of Justice in February.
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UK 'Emergency' Bulk Data Slurp Permissible In Pursuit Of 'Serious Crime'

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  • and that's serious, too
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by jfdavis668 ( 1414919 )
      I am serious — and don’t call me Shirley.
    • And it's legal because it's legal...

      The ruling suggests bulk collection and retention of customer data might not be in breach of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights -- if it's done legally and with safeguards

      So it's not illegal, so long as it's done legally.

  • Serious crime (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 19, 2016 @03:28PM (#52542913)

    > UK 'Emergency' Bulk Data Slurp Permissible In Pursuit Of 'Serious Crime'

    Such as copyright infringement of downloading a movie or album...

    • by Anonymous Coward

      > UK 'Emergency' Bulk Data Slurp Permissible In Pursuit Of 'Serious Crime'

      Such as copyright infringement of downloading a movie or album...

      Or pointing out the bad things that the people in power are doing.

    • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

      News at 11, the big story here, everyone is missing, the UK government just killed the data cloud. How can anyone ever trust a data cloud company any more, that company could be searched and that means all the data that it holds exposed to government perusal. Basically the UK government is claiming that all letters and packages at a post office are examinable should a warrant be issued against, any employee at that post office. The only way to secure your data now is own you own servers in your safe room o

  • What safeguards? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by HBI ( 604924 ) on Tuesday July 19, 2016 @03:49PM (#52543013) Journal

    If the government does a mass data collection, the data will be used for purposes beyond that originally intended. Period. That is how governments work. Having spent the last 15 years of my life in the bowels of one of the largest governments in the world, I know whereof I speak.

    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      Ireland was the test in the 1960-90's. The UK collected every domestic phone call and all calls in and out. The data was then used to track US sympathisers, funding and support networks.
      The data was never needed to be used in UK courts as it was acted on in other direct ways by the UK gov/mil. The fun part is now this the gov can collect the any bulk data that gets sorted by site accessed, credit card, ip, user details, isp and legally go to court with its logs and findings. Just protesting or question
  • by jenningsthecat ( 1525947 ) on Tuesday July 19, 2016 @04:26PM (#52543293)

    and "serious crime" increasingly is equated with thoughtcrime. The definition of "legally" is fluid and arbitrary, and "safeguards" are totally unspecified and undefined; this renders both terms utterly meaningless in the context of TFA. "(L)aid down by proper legislative process" and "respect the essence of the right to respect for privacy and data protection" are weasel words and part of a snow job.

    Undefined, non-specific buzz-words are the perennially favourite tools of despots and would-be dictators. Unfortunately, today they are also the lingua franca of both political and legal discourse; and a befuddled populace, (with the help of news media which are largely complicit in the scam), goes along with it all as though it means something other than their eventual enslavement.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      The UK threat level had never been below "substantial" in its history. Most of the time it's at "severe".

      In other words, they can take a big slurp any time they like, because terrorism.

      • Indeed. When I went to school, we used to learn a story about a boy and a wolf. It didn't end well for him, and one of my biggest concerns about the whole terrorism paranoia thing is that our governments are making exactly the same mistake.

  • safeguards, I do not think that word means what you think it means

  • Canadian citizens have a right to privacy when in the EU, which the UK is still a part of.

    This includes data slurps.

    And it's in the Constitution.

  • Of David Davis (a Brexiteer) taking a case to the European Court of Justice about violation of his privacy rights, as defined by the European Charter of Fundamental Rights; a document his new boss Theresa May (who opposed Brexit) has publicly said she would like to tear up [theguardian.com].

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