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Crime Government Software Your Rights Online

German Police Allowed To Use Its Own "Federal Trojan" (helpnetsecurity.com) 50

An anonymous reader writes: The German Interior Ministry has approved for investigative use a spying Trojan developed by the German Federal Criminal Police (a so-called "federal Trojan"). In fact, it could end up being used as early as this week. The police will have to get a court order to use the spyware, and prove that the suspect is involved in a crime threatening citizens' "life, limb or liberty". The malware has been developed in-house, and has been available since autumn 2015. It is supposed to be used only for so-called telecommunication surveillance at the source, i.e. to read emails, chats and wiretap phone calls made by the target via his or her computer or smartphone, and not to access files, steal passwords, or set up video or audio surveillance via the device.
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German Police Allowed To Use Its Own "Federal Trojan"

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  • Isn't that what our Secret Service uses when they're partying and hiring hookers?
    • Trojan Man!
    • A Scottish military officer strolls into an apothecary shop. From
      the pouch hanging from his kilt he extracts a used condom and
      places it upon the counter.

      The apothecary says, "Hoot man, Wat be this yur'er thrustin'
      befor me".

      "T'is a used condom, sir, and I've come t' ask ye; hey much to
      replace it and hey much to repair it?"

      "Aye," replies the apothecary, as he examines the condom.
      "T'would be six pence to replace it and thra' pence, heypenny to
      repair it."

      "Thank ye" says the Scottish military officer as he picks

  • It can help prevent infection and pregnancy.
    • It can help prevent infection and pregnancy.

      I'd be ok with an infection now and again. But the pregnancy, I'll pass on that. What about the STD's though, if your offering the clap...where can I sign up?

  • Seriously, now what am I going to do with my lolicon collection...Anyone looking for a new source material?
  • *updates antivirus*

  • Well... [theguardian.com] we learned it from watching you.

    B^)

    Watching Us.

  • And given the fact that lots of governments are spying on you already, your liberty is threatened anyway.
    • by theprophetof sarcasm ( 4443937 ) on Tuesday February 23, 2016 @09:53AM (#51566333)

      And given the fact that lots of governments are spying on you already, your liberty is threatened anyway.

      Can most people really complain about liberties? I just recently turned 30, I can see the liberties and right my parents had. I can see things were much better for them at my age. Now I look at what we currently have, and fear that they are infringing just a little to close. However at the same time I feel that we as a culture are starting to accept some of these abuses of power due to fear of "terrorism". So my real fear is for the future generations, what little rights will they have in 30 years from now? Will they even have any, will they just be completely desensitized to the situation and not even care about civil liberties anymore?

  • "It is supposed to be used only for so-called telecommunication surveillance at the source, i.e. to read emails, chats and wiretap phone calls made by the target via his or her computer or smartphone, and not to access files, steal passwords, or set up video or audio surveillance via the device."

    Phew, for a second there I thought we'd need to call on the powers of Tim Cook to save us.

    This is fine, since they are just spying on mass communications at the flick of a switch instead of trying to access a specif

  • Europe (Score:5, Insightful)

    by 110010001000 ( 697113 ) on Tuesday February 23, 2016 @10:18AM (#51566523) Homepage Journal
    The enlightened European citizens would never allow this to happen in the EU, unlike the silly Americans. Oh wait, you mean it is already in place and no one asked the citizens their opinion? Carry on then.
  • by fisted ( 2295862 ) on Tuesday February 23, 2016 @10:39AM (#51566667)

    As a German I feel discriminated against, for the new Federal Trojan will not run on my BSD machines. As if it wasn't bad enough that commercial software tends to be Windows-only, now also government-written stuff that I paid for with my tax euros.

    Does somebody by any chance know a hack to still get it working?

    • by voss ( 52565 )

      You people with your bsd machines are all alike, cheap socialist people with affordable healthcare and free education running bsd on their worn out 10 year old boxes feeling entitled to all the latest trojans and spyware. I pay for my operating system to be slowed down by spyware and viruses and I pay for antivirus to slow my system down some more. Why should you be entitled to this when you didnt even pay for it??? CLOSE THE BORDERS! Make Murica Great again!

      (Before you flame me...this was meant humorously)

    • How about a compromise? You downgrade to one of the two OpenBSD releases with a remote security hole in the default install, and then they port it to BSD?
  • " It is supposed to be used only for..."

    The cry of scumbag dictators everywhere...

  • They never had a problem with the government spying on its citizens.

    I mean, the US, UK, Canada, etc. all did it. But there weren't any problems that arose from the government spying. In contrast to Russia, China, North Korea and Germany.

  • ... the trojan ends up in the hands of black hats, gets "improved", sold and ends up on the computers of the German government?

  • Will this "Bundestrojaner" be on the anti-virus companies secret whitelist (i.e. will not be flagged)?

Heard that the next Space Shuttle is supposed to carry several Guernsey cows? It's gonna be the herd shot 'round the world.

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