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Edward Snowden To Keynote This Weekend's Free State Project Liberty Forum (reason.com) 73

cold fjord writes: Nick Gillespie at Reason is heading to The Free State Project's annual Liberty Forum being held this weekend in Manchester, New Hampshire. One of the highlights and a big draw this year is the keynote address by Edward Snowden via the Internet. Nick Gillespie will be interviewing Edward Snowden. Snowden is also scheduled to answer questions from participants submitted ahead of time. There are already reported to be 2,000 Free State Project members in the state, and reports from Brian Doherty indicate they are already effecting change: "Over 1,900 Free Staters already are there and we've reported here at Reason on some of what they're already accomplished, from getting 15 of their brethren in the state House, challenging anti-ridehail laws, fighting in court for outre religious liberty, winning legal battles over taping cops, being mocked by Colbert for heroically paying off people's parking meters, hosting cool anything goes festivals for libertarians, nullifying pot juries, and inducing occasional pants-wetting absurd paranoia in local statists."
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Edward Snowden To Keynote This Weekend's Free State Project Liberty Forum

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  • by AbRASiON ( 589899 ) * on Friday February 19, 2016 @07:32PM (#51545339) Journal

    Can I ask,

    How is Edward Snowden (and Julian Assange, in a similar situation) kept alive financially? I mean where is the money coming from, rent, food, etc? Are these guys doomed long term?
    It's something I don't see discussed much, people talk about their freedom, but regardless of that, what lives do they have now and will they have in 5 or 15 years time?

    Can either of them buy stuff on the internet even? If Snowden tried to use his Paypal (US) account would it be shut down? monitored? funds drained? I'm curious about these finer details about these 2 guys.
    Sorry, mostly off topic.

    • by Sowelu ( 713889 ) on Friday February 19, 2016 @07:39PM (#51545395)

      I'm pretty sure that keynote speakers get paid--if not directly, then by proxy to someone who rents them a place for free. Arrangements get made.

    • Edward Snowden has a job. I assume his funds were all seized when they cancelled his passport.

      • by JBMcB ( 73720 )

        The feds can seize funds if they can prove a suspect is using them for ongoing criminal activity. Not sure if they can do that with Snowden.

        Besides that, how exactly do you "cancel" a passport? I mean, when you are being put on trial, they make you give up your passport, right? There isn't some central clearinghouse of passport information - each country has it's own system. So if the state department does revoke someone's passport somehow, how does Hungary know not to let someone in?

    • Russia has its own equivalents for services like PayPal.

  • We start out fairly professional...

    "Over 1,900 Free Staters already are there and we've reported here at Reason on some of what they're already accomplished, from getting 15 of their brethren in the state House, challenging anti-ridehail laws, fighting in court for outre religious liberty...

    Wait, is that a typo? Is it French [wiktionary.org] for "to go to excess"? I'm not sure religious liberty counts a being particularly "unconventional" in this country

    ...winning legal battles over taping cops, being mocked by Colbert for heroically...

    Well, that's rather subjective.

    paying off people's parking meters, hosting cool anything goes festivals for libertarians, nullifying pot juries, and inducing occasional pants-wetting absurd paranoia in local statists."

    Ah, yes, well... I'm sure when their pants dry, they'll be quite happy to accept your views as the well-reasoned path toward an ideal civilization.

    • You misread it... it's not the freestaters who are peeing in their pants. It's the existing statists who are losing power .

      The statists want no change from status quo. They are in power now.

      the free staters can have a high impact in low population states. As few as 281,000 free staters could gain control of 2 senators and a representative. Then at the very least their senators could gum up the works, or even enhance their power as the 2 deciding swing votes in many cases.

      It's a flaw in our system that

      • by Anonymous Coward

        That's what the House is for - the Representatives are proportional to the population while the Senators are proportional to the States. The idea is the Senate represents the State interests while the House represents the people. It used to be that senators were selected by state legislatures instead of popular vote. If you live in the US please learn how and why your government is structured before sounding like a clueless dolt.

        • Dude, well aware-- the only difference is that you haven't started thinking about what it means that roughly 3 million adult voting citizens out of 250 million adult voting citizens (roughly 1%!) control 10% of the Senate. You know.. the Senate that decides who the supreme court is going to be.

          The government was structured the way it was because the founding fathers had no clue that we would allow states like california with roughly 10% of all citizens in it while other states would be mostly unpopulated l

      • by fnj ( 64210 )

        It's a flaw in our system that a state with 586,000 citizens gets to control two senators while a state with 38,000,000 citizens also only gets to control two citizens.

        Sigh. [rolls eyes] No, it's not a flaw. Do you have any concept of dictatorship of the majority? Our "system" was carefully crafted with balances. The House of Representatives is for, er, REPRESENTATION. The Senate is not just by name, but conceptually, based on the Roman Senate. "Senatus" means "council of elders". To be sure, the U.S. Senat

        • In fairness the 17th amendment was enacted because the senate had already become ridiculously corrupted. One would think that state legislatures would be wise to corruption and keep their senators in line, but apparently they were more interested in rewarding their favorites with a cushy position with lots of high-profit corruption potential.

    • Ah, yes, well... I'm sure when their pants dry, they'll be quite happy to accept your views as the well-reasoned path toward an ideal civilization.

      That would be the worst thing that could happen to this project. Maintaining ideological purity is hard work, and one of the few ways to make people reject the temptations of compromise, moderation or adjusting one's views as new information arrives is having an enemy. That's why they invented the whole concept of "statist", ironic as it might be to apply to som

  • Edward Snowdon (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Reading the comments b- it's all talk,talk, blabber. Why is it apprently so difficult for some to acknowledge the absolute selfless integrity, not to mention personal bravery and well-founded sense of moral outrage that led Edward Snowdon to do what he did? We are all benefitting from it - and will continue to do so.To those who sneeringly ask why he didn't go to the relevant US authorities - I suggestr you ask Thomas Drake, Walter Binney et al that question! He did not "choose" to live in Russia -he w

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