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Cellphones Communications Government Privacy

ACLU Sues Anaheim Police For Public Records On Cell Phone Surveillance (scpr.org) 29

New submitter Lacey Waymire writes: The ACLU of Northern California is suing for a release of public records regarding Anaheim police's use of cell phone surveillance devices. "We don't think any surveillance devices, particularly these sorts of invasive cell phone surveillance devices, should ever be acquired or used without intense public debate and the adoption of safeguards to ensure they are only used in ways that follow our Constitution and laws," attorney Matt Cagle said. (See this Boing Boing posting with a bit more on "the happiest surveillance state on earth.")
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ACLU Sues Anaheim Police For Public Records On Cell Phone Surveillance

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  • In particular the 2nd and 10th Amendments....

  • by NormHome ( 99305 ) on Saturday January 30, 2016 @08:47PM (#51406359)

    There have been plenty of instances where people have tried to pry open the "secret" door number 3" and look at whats inside. In lots of news articles each agency (state and federal) has cited a legally binding nondisclosure agreement with the manufacturer as to why they aren't allowed to disclose any information regarding the use and specifications of the so called Stingray device. Until some court invalidates the NDA good luck getting any information on those things. It seems to me since federal and state money is being spent on these things the public has a certain right to know how much. Also I believe that there are several court cases pending where stingrays were used to catch the perpetrator and the defense has tried to subpoena data about them and has never been successful.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Also I believe that there are several court cases pending where stingrays were used to catch the perpetrator and the defense has tried to subpoena data about them and has never been successful.

      Even better, the prosecutors dropped the charges. They're so afraid of having this technology evaluated in front of a judge, they're willing to drop criminal charges to keep the Stingray workings a secret.

      • by wbr1 ( 2538558 )
        That's because a smart investigator/prosecutor uses the stingray in conjunction with parallel construction. No need to even bring it up then.
    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      NDA vs discovery in an open court for a skilled legal team?
      Offer a letter that has a very good deal early on? No more lawyer asking questions in open court.
      Ensure no funds can be found or accessed to get a good private legal team and needed local experts. Offer other legal services that have less funds to legally trace a case back to its origins.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You see, the whole "NDAs that are legally binding" argument seems like complete BS. IANAL, but in my adult life having to deal with quite a few contracts, I have learned a few things. One of them being that contract law is literally the lowest form of law in existence. If a clause in a contract contradicts a law at any higher level, that clause is automatically null and void. If I sign a contract that says you are allowed to kill me, if you kill me, that clause in the contract will be found void, and yo

      • My understanding on the injury clauses is that
        A) It forces at least a formal signed acknowledgement of the potential for injury
        B) It reduces since of the not frivolous injury claims

Nature always sides with the hidden flaw.

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