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Amazon Blasts FAA On Drone Approvals, Regulations 60

itwbennett writes Late last week, Amazon was issued permission by the FAA to fly an experimental drone as part of its tests for a planned automatic delivery service but it came too late, Paul Misener, vice president of global public policy at Amazon, told lawmakers on Tuesday. 'The UAS [unmanned aircraft system] approved last week by the FAA has already become obsolete,' he said. As a result, Amazon has filed for permission to fly a more advanced drone—one that is already being flown in several countries including the U.K., said Misener, who was speaking at a hearing of the Senate Committee on commerce, science and transportation.
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Amazon Blasts FAA On Drone Approvals, Regulations

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  • by NoNonAlphaCharsHere ( 2201864 ) on Thursday March 26, 2015 @06:15AM (#49343257)
    We're a corporation, damn it. We should be allowed to do whatever we want, whenever we want it. Your petty concerns about the public airspace are needlessly impeding our relentless drive for profit profit profit. Maybe some generous campaign contributions will help you see things our way.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      We're a corporation, damn it. We should be allowed to do whatever we want, whenever we want it. Your petty concerns about the public airspace are needlessly impeding our relentless drive for profit profit profit. Maybe some generous campaign contributions will help you see things our way.

      It would make far more sense to just set guidelines like keep it below x feet and x distance from airports rather than doing what the FAA did and require:

      1. No flights at all without permission.
      2. Keep it under x feet.
      3. Keep it in a specific remote area.
      4. Get permission in advance for each new model of drone you want to fly (with the FAA apparently taking so long to approve them that they're already obsolete).
      5. Have a pilot operate the drone.

      That is just way more than necessary. If they just said "

      • by Trepidity ( 597 )

        If it's on their own property sure, but if someone is flying an aircraft over my property, I think it's fair to ask for a bit more specific licensing to ensure they're flying only safe, well-maintained, properly operated devices.

    • by AlecC ( 512609 )

      Except that this is the FAA, which is not part of Congress, and Congress is trying to kick the FAA into moving faster.

      • ... Congress is trying to kick the FAA into moving faster.

        You mean the Congress that has been purchased by corporate and other special interests?

        • Did you have another one in mind?

          Of course the congress full of people on the payroll of everybody except the voting public.

          That's what it's for.

    • profit profit profit.

      This is amazon we're talking about so THAT's not the motivating factor...

    • Insightful? More like hippy liberal corporation bashing.
      Now this isn't some conservative rant. The FAA should be taking such things carefully, so not to cause problems. However, some of the rules are not focused on more agile aircraft development, where drones are involved there is less needs to verify personal safety, and changes to the drone technology shouldn't need as much screwenty. So unlike a Jet where they decided to change a component, as the safety of the pilot is a major concern, and such chan

    • This is all great satire. Except Amazon doesn't make profits.
  • ....from flying over my house, that is all I want.

  • So what does the more advanced drone look like?

  • ... SCOTUS says Amazon is a people.

    If Amazon gets concessions, the We The People will get them, too, or file discrimination suits.

  • Instead of blindly approving every proposal put forth by profit-hungry companies, I'd much prefer the FAA takes its time to assure the safety of the drones.
    • I'd rather the FAA take a proactive, and active, role in creating rules which allow operations and enforce existing damage and nuisance laws. Letting the FAA "take it's time" is like telling ID that there's no rush on getting Duke Nukem Forever out as long as they do it right.

      • And if they make an error, they can just amend the rules, just like I did in that topic line.

        • Lets say the FAA makes an error (IE no means for coordination between UAV and Manned aircraft). The consequences of the drone taking out the EMT helicopter are quite big. Maybe the EMT helicopter only kills everyone on board, and not all the rescuers on the ground, then I guess it isn't so bad.

          No, let them go through the process and get it right. Your local EMT will thank you someday.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        I'd rather the FAA take a proactive, and active, role in creating rules which allow operations and enforce existing damage and nuisance laws. Letting the FAA "take it's time" is like telling ID that there's no rush on getting Duke Nukem Forever out as long as they do it right.

        Drones are tricky.

        The FAA has no choice BUT to take it slow because there are a lot of stakeholders to consider - including regular airspace users, air traffic control, etc.

        I mean, there's a hobby advisory circular that's just that, ad

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Hey Bezos,

    I don't know if you realize this but this SOP for the FAA. You should be told to shut-up and get inline like anyone else involved in aviation. Also, Drone deliver is stupid. You can't possible hope to avoid all the powerlines, etc. I have seen the paper work needed to approve flying stunt jets. It was huge and this wasn't even close to the first place to offer training in those exact stunt jets.

    If you think that FAA shouldn't take their time why don't you get aboard my home built experimental hel

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