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Crime The Courts United States

Russian Man Extradited To US For Heartland, Dow Jones Cyberattacks 88

itwbennett writes: A Russian man accused of high-profile cyberattacks on Nasdaq, Dow Jones, Heartland Payment Systems and 7-Eleven has been extradited to the U.S. and appeared in court in Newark, New Jersey on Tuesday. Vladimir Drinkman, 34, of Syktyykar and Moscow, Russia was charged for his alleged role in a data theft conspiracy that targeted major corporate networks and stole more than 160 million credit card numbers, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a press release. Drinkman appeared Tuesday in U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey and entered a plea of not guilty to the 11 counts he faces. His trial is scheduled to begin in April.
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Russian Man Extradited To US For Heartland, Dow Jones Cyberattacks

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  • Extradition? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DoofusOfDeath ( 636671 ) on Wednesday February 18, 2015 @01:22AM (#49078395)

    I couldn't tell from the story - was he actually extradited by Russia? If so, I'm really surprised they're welling to extradite anyone to us these days.

    • Re:Extradition? (Score:5, Informative)

      by mentil ( 1748130 ) on Wednesday February 18, 2015 @01:26AM (#49078407)

      TFA makes clear that he was arrested/detained in The Netherlands, so he was presumably extradited from there.

      • Yes, somehow I missed that when reading it.

        • It's not in the summary, and shit, remember where you are... you get extra credit for demonstrating the courage to click the article link.

          My first thought? Snowden's fucked.

          No individual on the planet benefits less from a thawing of US/Soviet relations.

      • Thanks that's indeed informative. Amazing nobody thought this information should be in TFS. Reading the summary, the obvious question was: what? a Russian citizen is extradited to the US? From Russia??
        • Thanks that's indeed informative. Amazing nobody thought this information should be in TFS. Reading the summary, the obvious question was: what? a Russian citizen is extradited to the US? From Russia??

          You don't see the beauty of it?

          You and I both clicked on the story. Devilishly clever.

    • by jtara ( 133429 )

      What part of "extradited" did you not understand? No, he wasn't "nabbed" without process.

      He was arrested in The Netherlands, and the Dutch agreed to extradite him.

      Reading. Comprehension.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        Clearly I missed that detail from the story, but your response was extremely rude. I think you owe me an apology.

      • What part of "extradited" did you not understand?

        It wasn't the "extradited" part that the GP had a problem with.

        He was arrested in The Netherlands, and the Dutch agreed to extradite him.

        The absence of this from the summary is what led the GP to ask his quite reasonable question.

        No, he wasn't "nabbed" without process.

        The GP never implied that he might have been.

        Reading. Comprehension.

        • by jtara ( 133429 )

          The absence of this from the summary is what led the GP to ask his quite reasonable question.

          You're supposed to read the actual article before opening your yap.

          And, as others have noted, ..tse would have been rude. I was relatively nice, but unforgivingly direct. I mean, not even Linus-rude. Heck, I might not even have been Matz-rude, and that's not very rude! It's /. Respect the culture.

          No, he wasn't "nabbed" without process.

          The GP never implied that he might have been

          Yes, he did. He asked if the guy

          • You're supposed to read the actual article before opening your yap.

            It's /. Respect the culture.

            Or what?

            First you say people should be reading the article, then you say /. culture should be respected. Those are mutually exclusive!

            Yes, he did. He asked if the guy was "actually" extradited.

            He said "Was he actually extradited by Russia" which doesn't imply that due process wasn't followed.

      • I'd really love to see how much people accept the "process" if a US individual is arrested in the Netherlands to be sent on trial to Russia.

        • Don't worry! As a US citizen living abroad, I can guarantee you that the US government does not give a shit about us. In fact, they regard us as little more than traitors or tax-dodgers (which is pretty much the same thing).

          When other countries' citizens get into trouble, their governments will at least make a gesture to help. I've seen it - Sweden, Britain, Italy...they actually send consular representatives out to investigate, attend trials, etc. I talked with them and it turns out this is their job

    • you must be reading some other article, it specifically states there were arrested and extradited from Netherlands. They were arrested when travelling there.

  • At least they caught him and willing to give him the justice that this crime deserves.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Yep, expect him to get a well deserved 50 years for a non violent crime

      Meanwhile, murders get 25 years.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Yep, expect him to get a well deserved 50 years for a non violent crime

        Meanwhile, murders get 25 years.

        It's a good thing he didn't have any pot, he'd be facing life.

  • by hcs_$reboot ( 1536101 ) on Wednesday February 18, 2015 @02:19AM (#49078543)
    "The hackers often gained initial entry through an SQL injection attack" (TFA) SQL injection? Shouldn't the "victims" be prosecuted also, for poor IT management?
    • Yeah guy who forgets to lock his door or even is careless to never lock hiis door should be also prosecuted when his hows id burgled.
      • by hcs_$reboot ( 1536101 ) on Wednesday February 18, 2015 @04:16AM (#49078813)

        Yeah guy who forgets to lock his door or even is careless to never lock hiis door should be also prosecuted when his hows id burgled.

        We are not talking about locking a door, we're talking about implementing basic IT security. Locking your door is not a job. Implementing security is. When a web site fails the basic SQL injection test, the first thing a hacker looks at, there is clearly a problem at all steps of the site development.

        • I know that it has to be done properly and injection test are the first to do but treating person that hacked into a system on the same level as people resposible for security is absurd. There should be ramifications for them but prosecution?
        • by dcw3 ( 649211 )

          Your basic premise is that nobody should be allowed to legally make a website w/o "implementing basic IT security", correct? Because if they get hacked, they should be punished.

          Yes, that makes perfect sense...in some small minded world.

      • Over here he is. For "facilitating a crime".

        Your point being?

    • by ljw1004 ( 764174 )

      SQL injection? Shouldn't the "victims" be prosecuted also, for poor IT management?

      No, because poor IT management isn't a crime.

      Poor software authoring isn't a crime either. Imagine if unpaid open source contributors were held liable for bugs.

    • Shouldn't the "victims" be prosecuted also, for poor IT management?

      No.

      • No.

        Maybe I should take a bit more time to answer. And, maybe, the term prosecution is stronger than necessary in this context.
        However. What happens here, and that's also true for the Sony hacking over the past years, is that those big companies neglect their IT teams. Big time. IT is not a profession anymore, IT is a disposable tool. While sitting in the middle of decision makers and sales, IT engineering and development - in these companies - is relegated to some utilities, like haulage. No much effort is pu

  • Given the state of Russia-USA relations, they probably would have given him a medal. His buddies have so far been smart enough to avoid getting arrested in a country with whom the USA has an extradition treaty.

    "Kalinin, Kotov and Rytikov remain at large."

    Neither the article, nor the linked PCworld article say much about how they identified these guys by name. I'd be curious to know.

  • Will anybody be so kind to post a proof link of any American extradited to Russia?

  • A Russian named Drinkman? Wow, that's stereotyping. Hate to be pulled over for suspected DUI, also.
    • by mistr ( 61923 )

      And the city name Syktyvkar is a conjugation of the words "Sick", "Thief" and "Guy" in norwegian. Drinkman from Sick-thief-guy. Just sayin'

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