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+ - The Internet's broken. Who's going to invent a new one?-> 1

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The Internet has evolved to support an incredibly diverse set of needs, but we may be reaching a point at which new solutions and new infrastructure are needed in particular to improve security, connect with the Internet of Things and address an increasingly mobile computing landscape. Today, NSF announced $15 million in awards to develop, deploy and test future Internet architecture in challenging real-world environments. These clean-slate designs explore novel network architectures and networking concepts and also consider the larger societal, economic and legal issues that arise from the interplay between the Internet and society.

Each project will partner with cities, non-profit organizations, academic institutions and industrial partners across the nation to test their Internet architectures. Some of the test environments include: a vehicular network deployment in Pittsburgh, a context-aware weather emergency notification system for Dallas/Fort Worth, and a partnership with Open mHealth, a patient-centric health ecosystem based in San Francisco."

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The Internet's broken. Who's going to invent a new one?

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  • Yes, all you idiots who want an Internet Of Things, go build your own internetwork and GTF off of ours. That should free up enough IPv4 addresses to keep us going a couple more decades.

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