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Sci-Fi Television United Kingdom Your Rights Online Entertainment

BBC and FACT Shut Down Doctor Who Fansite 186

Posted by timothy
from the you're-gonna-need-a-bigger-tardis dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this report from Torrentfreak, excerpting: In just a few hours time the brand new season of Doctor Who will premiere, kicking off with the first episode 'Deep Breath'. There's been a huge build up in the media, but for fans who prefer to socialize and obtain news via a dedicated community, today brings bad news. Doctor Who Media (DWM) was a site created in 2010 and during the ensuing four and a half years it amassed around 25,000 dedicated members. A source close to the site told TF that since nothing like it existed officially, DWM's core focus was to provide a central location and community for everything in the 'Whoniverse,' from reconstructions of missing episodes to the latest episodes, and whatever lay between. But yesterday, following a visit by representatives from the BBC and Federation Against Copyright Theft, the site's operator took the decision to shut down the site for good.
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BBC and FACT Shut Down Doctor Who Fansite

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  • by malacandrian (2145016) on Saturday August 23, 2014 @11:32AM (#47736831)

    The fact that he yielded on this suggests to me that he was aware that a search warrant would find something on his computer(s) that shouldn't have been there in the first place. It's unfortunate the site is gone, but we're not actually seeing the whole story here. Sadly, because of how things have already went, we probably never will.

    We are seeing the whole story here, /. is just choosing not to cover it adequately. The site was hosting full episodes, which was the main reason anyone visited it. This isn't the BBC using overreaching copyright laws to leverage control over its brand, it's the BBC using the reasonable end of copyright law to protect its right to control the distribution of content.

  • by Teun (17872) on Saturday August 23, 2014 @12:56PM (#47737311) Homepage
    Often, that's why comparable countries have done away with the licensing scheme and pay public broadcasters from general taxation.

    But for their own reasons the UK parliament has resisted such moves as they see the overriding importance of keeping the BBC free from political influence.

    Yet, as a Brit you can't avoid being a taxpayer but you can most certainly avoid being a licence payer.

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