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Censorship China Networking Open Source Software

Knocking Down the Great Firewall of China 167

Posted by Soulskill
from the crumbling-from-a-million-tiny-cracks dept.
New submitter Nocturrne writes: The FOSS project Lantern is having great success in unblocking the internet for many users in oppressive regimes, like China and Iran. Much like Tor and BitTorrent, Lantern is using peer-to-peer networking to overcome firewalls, but with the additional security of a trusted network of friends. "If you download Lantern in an uncensored region, you can connect with someone in a censored region, who can then access whatever content they want through you. What makes the system so unique is that it operates on the basis of trust. ... Through a process called consistent routing, the amount of information any single Lantern user can learn about other users is limited to a small subset, making infiltration significantly more difficult." The network of peers is growing, but we need more friends in uncensored countries to join us.
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Knocking Down the Great Firewall of China

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 16, 2014 @09:22AM (#47684331)

    The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

    Why don't they mind their own business and stop trying to push their ideology worldwide? China isn't a democracy - neither are 99.9% of those that claim to be but that's beside the point. They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere.. You have no right to decide what's right or wrong or to push your means to them, the same way as they don't or shouldn't push their ideology to your countries.

    Yes. The article is all about people forcing their viewpoints on others. Unfortunately you did not grasp which group was doing the forcing and which group was giving people options to prevent it.

  • by CaptainDork (3678879) on Saturday August 16, 2014 @09:23AM (#47684339)

    ... this? Just no.

    Peer-to-peer based on trust.

    What could possibly go wrong?

  • by stephanruby (542433) on Saturday August 16, 2014 @09:36AM (#47684387)

    The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

    Open Source isn't a person. It's neither political, nor apolitical. Open Source is a tool that makes sharing software much easier. That is all.

    They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere..

    Why should I? If a friend of mine in China wants me to give him access to github because its government blocked it for some reason (as it has done in the past), then I will certainly give it to him. Not that I was ever asked, everyone I know in China already pays (or has their own company pay) for a private proxy to ssh through.

    You have no right to decide what's right or wrong or to push your means to them,

    I have the right to say whatever I want, and they have the right to ignore me. Just like you have the right to say whatever you want, and I have the right to ignore you. The same goes for my government, please feel free to try to influence it. Most people running my government are self-serving idiots anyway.

  • by znrt (2424692) on Saturday August 16, 2014 @10:39AM (#47684575)

    The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

    "they" who?

    Why don't they mind their own business and stop trying to push their ideology worldwide? China isn't a democracy - neither are 99.9% of those that claim to be but that's beside the point. They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere.

    what kind of being could possibly put "99.9% of democracies aren't democracies" and "we should respcet rules and regulations" in the same sentence. a mushroom?

  • by redeIm (3779401) on Saturday August 16, 2014 @12:25PM (#47684933) Homepage

    I don't recall anyone forcing anyone to use this. If there are people who don't like the fundamental right to free speech and love censorship, then they're welcome to simply not use this.

    How would you feel if another country did it to you?

    Did what? There are no invasions here. What's with you idiots? Do you have some problem with giving people the option to get around censorship if they want to or something?

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