Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Censorship

Law Repressing Social Media, Bloggers Now In Effect In Russia 167

Posted by timothy
from the it-takes-a-village-but-not-yours dept.
An anonymous reader writes On Friday, Russia implemented a new law that significantly limits its citizens' online free speech. Under this new law, social media sites must "retain user data for at least six months...within the country's boundaries so it can be available for government inspection." Also, "bloggers with at least 3,000 daily readers must register with Roskomnadzor, the regulator that also oversees Russia's main media outlets." This, of course, means that popular bloggers will no longer be able to remain anonymous.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Law Repressing Social Media, Bloggers Now In Effect In Russia

Comments Filter:
  • next... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by guygo (894298) on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:21PM (#47586517)
    the Berlin Wall goes back up.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      The Republicans are too stupid to comprehend what that was. They have no memory which is why they worship the Russians now. They want the same style of oppressive government here in the US. That is why their kind is working so hard to destroy the US. We are already far past the point of no return. The only thing we can do is hide from their death squads while they try to kill all of our children. That is the way of their kind. They attack and murder us constantly. My roommate was recently mugged by

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by epyT-R (613989)

        Uh what? No, the left wants to increase the size of state. The neocons want to use that state to enforce laws that benefit their corporate benefactors. Of course, there is cross over, too, as democrats have many corporate backers and repubs certainly have ideological tenets they want pushed on the population.

        Too bad neither of them remember what individual liberty is.

    • Re:next... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:43PM (#47586643)

      You mean the Iron Curtain

      And yes.

      • Realistically, no. Russia is a capitalist country dependent on global capital and trade. It cannot afford to cut itself off like it thought it could when it was USSR and had a lot of satellite countries to buy its crappy goods.

        • Re:next... (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Karmashock (2415832) on Saturday August 02, 2014 @01:13AM (#47587397)

          Russia's economy is dominated by its energy exports. It can and is largely subsisting on that income.

          If you want to break Russia's economy then you need to give europe an alternative energy source.

          Controversial as it may be, we should probably be advocating hydrologic fracturing in Eastern Europe. If Ukraine and Poland can ween themselves off Russian energy imports and possibly become net exporters to Germany then Russia's economic position will collapse indifferent to whether or not they censor bloggers.

          • by sribe (304414)

            Controversial as it may be, we should probably be advocating hydrologic fracturing in Eastern Europe. If Ukraine and Poland can ween themselves off Russian energy imports and possibly become net exporters to Germany then Russia's economic position will collapse indifferent to whether or not they censor bloggers.

            Or, Russia will retaliate in a way that will kick off WWII...

            • The Russians won't go to nuclear war unless directly invaded by a nuclear power.

              We should be able to slowly choke them to death just like we did to the soviets.

              What you're effectively saying is that Putin is more dangerous then Stalin. I don't find that credible.

              • by Talderas (1212466)

                Khrushchev was the dangerous one. It's hard to tell just how dangerous Stalin may have been. There were signs he was warming towards open relations with the west out of necessity and was looking towards consolidating Soviet rule rather than expanding. Khrushchev on the other hand was the one that stepped the world most closely to nuclear war. I think there's a legitimate argument that Putin is more dangerous than Stalin was during his last years.

                • Stalin was not warming to anything. The man did everything in his power to spit in our faces. The cold war only happened in the first place because of stalin. And that asshole was throwing how many poor people into labor camps?

                  Fuck you for even trying to rehabilitate that piece of shit.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by rtb61 (674572)

          You live in the world of WTO illusion. Primary resources rich country can pretty much chug along on their own as long as they are patient with catching up. This attitude always leads to outside intervention either through disrupting and fomenting revolution or through direct invasion. The idea being to drive them to borrow illusory capital to buy in mass consumerism products and drive debt in order to strip mine the countries primary resources. Russia is quite simply to powerful to do this hence some const

        • by Anonymous Coward

          For your info, USSR did not cut it self. It was the western countries imposed the embargoes and what not. Actually, USSR was supplying the gas to Europe for the past 40 years. Is CIA report good enough for you? Maybe you should learn to read before spreading the lies, you prick.

          http://www.foia.cia.gov/sites/default/files/document_conversions/89801/DOC_0000500594.pdf

          "Western Europe views the USSR as a more reliable supplier than many alternative sources [...] Moscow is less likely than Algiers to use gas le

        • So how many Georgia's and Ukraine's are required for independence? The real question is where do you draw the line in order to maximize the benefits for the rich and powerful in Russia.
        • Russia is not threatening to cut itself off the entire world, though, but only the West (in lieu of China, and other BRICS countries in general).

    • by cytg.net (912690)
      Putin is gearing up for war.. a real war, and has been for the past 10 years+
  • by Anonymous Coward

    USA retains it forever, no matter what laws are in place.

  • Unlike the US/NSA.

    • by BradMajors (995624) on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:37PM (#47586611)

      And.... this information collection is legal in Russia, while what the NSA is doing is illegal.

      • ...while what the NSA is doing is illegal.

        Son of a bitch. All this time I though Lucas was a washed up, "has been" when I saw Ep. 1. It turns out he may have managed to channel the future presidents of the US [youtube.com]

        For now, it may be illegal. But how many illegal things have been ignored or reversed-pardoned-executive ordered by the current president and his predecessor? When do we get a Bush-Obama Sith lightning death match?

        Of course Lucas seems to have been pretty optimistic by the end of Ep. 3 thinking there were even two good guys left. I'm no

      • Illegal means the government can't do it without consequences. Clearly warrant-less wiretapping and spying are legal in the USA.
    • by Savage-Rabbit (308260) on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:56PM (#47586703)

      Unlike the US/NSA.

      No, the NSA is monitoring social media and bloggers, in Russia they have progressed from just monitoring to repressing them. I'm in no way in favor of what the NSA is doing but there is a difference between watcing bloggers and telling bloggers they have to register if they get a hitcount over 3000 or suffer the consequences, whatever they may be.

      • by qpqp (1969898) on Friday August 01, 2014 @10:59PM (#47587001)

        they get a hitcount over 3000

        It's 3000 unique visitors.

        "The draft introduced the definition of a popular blogger as someone whose internet page attracts at least 3,000 readers every day (earlier this week the authorities announced that these should be unique visitors, not just page hits) [...]"

        And

        Individuals who violate the law can be fined between 10,000 and 30,000 rubles (US$285-$855) and in cases when popular blogs are maintained by legal entities fines can reach 500,000 rubles ($14,285)."

        Source: http://rt.com/politics/177248-... [rt.com]
        I'm not saying that I agree with their line, but what was the last ruling on slander or defamation in the US? I think it was more than USD 855.
        Also, after what happened with the US backed NGOs trying to influence public opinion around the former USSR resulting in color revolutions (and, arguably, what's happening in the Ukraine now,) I'd have probably done the same to protect my national interests.

        • by theshowmecanuck (703852) on Saturday August 02, 2014 @12:48AM (#47587337) Journal
          The Russian law is to expose anonymous bloggers so Putin and his cronies know where to send the assassins when they see someone criticizing them or exposing their corruption. Same as when they had all the dissenting mainstream Russian journalists assassinated. Now Chairman Putin and his friends control the mainstream media, so on to phase 2: online journalists and bloggers. Of course they are thinking that announcing the law might save some money too, by intimidating people into not exposing the Chairman's lies (like the bullshit about Ukrainians needing any outside impetus to oust a corrupt Russian-backed president who syphoned off billions of dollars into his own pocket while sliding deeper into Chairman Putin's pocket).
          • Russian intelligence already knows who the bloggers are, they control the network. The goal here is intimidation.
        • This is way more than just defamation. For example, among many laws passed in the last 6 years or so, one criminalizes "public incitement to perform actions that violate the territorial integrity of Russia". In a twist of irony, given the recent events, a person was convicted under that law back in 2010 for distributing leaflets in his community which asked people whether they would be interested in holding a referendum on the independence of Karelia from Russia, and on its incorporation into Finland. For t

      • ...if they get a hitcount over 3000...

        Hey, what the hell, if you can get the government to provide your hitcounts for you, make the best of it. I would hope they could bump up their ad rates a bit.

    • by tarellel (863902)
      There's no need to register in the USA, seeing as how the NSA already knows who you are and what you're doing.
      • by sumdumass (711423)

        There has never been anonminity on the internet even without the NSA. There has only been hassles impeading the ability to find true identities leading to the appearance of it unless you hack a third party system and leave the blame with them.

        This law and the NSA only remove some of the hassles for power hungry governments.

      • Because all those bloggers critical of President Obama are being rounded up as we speak...

        Russia has a reputation for jailing or even killing critics of Putin or his allies. The last president of the United States accused of that sort of activity against opponents ended up resigning before his inevitable impeachment and conviction. Even in the latest IRS scandal, which may or may not represent targeting of critics by someone in the executive branch, the end result has been quite the opposite to what one wou

    • by poity (465672)

      At least conservatives are upfront about censorship, too. PRAISE CONSERVATISM

  • Mr Obama; (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:35PM (#47586603)

    The 80's called and they want to know if you need a foreign policy.

  • by Joe_Dragon (2206452) on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:44PM (#47586655)

    the USSR is back

    • by gymbrown (778195) on Friday August 01, 2014 @10:14PM (#47586819)
      I remember as a kid reading the Soviet Union’s constitution giving Soviet citizens more rights than the US. They had a very good constitution and Canada had none. I thought that in Canada, there was no protection similar to our first amendment but Canadians could say, type and publish their thoughts freely. The Soviet union required typewriters to be registered with a typing sample so unauthorized speech wouldn’t contaminate the citizens. Russia is going down the same hole as the Soviet Union and we are following close behind.
      • Re:the USSR is back (Score:5, Interesting)

        by sumdumass (711423) on Saturday August 02, 2014 @06:49AM (#47588033) Journal

        If the Soviet's constitution gave the people just one right, it gave more than the US constitution does. That is because the US constiitution does not give or grant rights. It bars government from taking away some of the rights peolle already posess.

        This is a pretty important difference.

      • I remember as a kid reading the Soviet Union’s constitution giving Soviet citizens more rights than the US. They had a very good constitution and Canada had none. I thought that in Canada, there was no protection similar to our first amendment but Canadians could say, type and publish their thoughts freely. The Soviet union required typewriters to be registered with a typing sample so unauthorized speech wouldn’t contaminate the citizens. Russia is going down the same hole as the Soviet Union and we are following close behind.

        Russia wants to be the Soviet Union again. They were a world power, whereas post-Soviet Russia was weak.

        Better than Americans giving up their rights out of a blown out of proportion fear of terrorism.

    • It's actually worse than that. It's devolving to the state of affairs of USSR on politics in general, and economics will likely tank to similar levels and below due to sanctions, but at the same time the things that were actually helpful to the citizens (and there were some, esp. given the other limitations... e.g. right to a job) are not coming back.

  • by Irate Engineer (2814313) on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:55PM (#47586693)
    Hmm,

    Edward Snowden's professed mission in life is to enable secure, anonymous internet communications.

    Edward Snowden's visa in Russia has expired.

    Now this.

    Snowden is on thin ice, I think. Where could he possibly go from Russia, except for a dark hole in GitMo?
    • by JeffAtl (1737988)

      It's terribly naive to believe that Snowden ever cared about anonymous internet communications. His only goal was to damage the United States.

      Note that internal spying that China, Russia and North Korea engage in are almost never brought to light by Snowden and if they are, it is always something very minor. The NSA would have lots of knowledge of these programs and probably even tapped into them, so why isn't Snowden doing all he can to bring those to light?

      To be clear, the internal that the NSA engaged

  • Easy fix (Score:4, Interesting)

    by penguinoid (724646) <spambait001@yahoo.com> on Friday August 01, 2014 @09:57PM (#47586725) Homepage Journal

    If all the Russian bloggers are just government controlled parrots, just switch to reading foreign blogs.

    Also, you could have a setup where your Russian blogger has only a single reader, a foreigner who re-blogs everything they write (unless Russia doesn't take kindly to being clever like this).

    • If all the Russian bloggers are just government controlled parrots, just switch to reading foreign blogs.

      Also, you could have a setup where your Russian blogger has only a single reader, a foreigner who re-blogs everything they write (unless Russia doesn't take kindly to being clever like this).

      As likely Russian bloggers who want to stay anonymous will VPN out of the country and post somewhere out of Russia's control.

      Control of social media is a bigger problem. A lot of Russians already believe whatever Putin tells them and now they'll have even less visibility of what's actually happening than they already do.

  • by turkeydance (1266624) on Friday August 01, 2014 @10:21PM (#47586837)
    freedom AFTER speech? not so much.
  • blog is writing on wall for YOU!

  • More details (Score:4, Informative)

    by Arker (91948) on Friday August 01, 2014 @10:51PM (#47586975) Homepage
    This link [rt.com] puts a little meat on the bones, though the story is still sketchy. Seems the law was aimed at 5 or 6 specific bloggers, though probably upwards of 500 could wind up being covered. ISPs not happy with it. Law purports to regulate Russian-language blogging, not limited by geography or physical placement. So a foreigner could theoretically run afoul of it if they publish in Russian (and become popular doing so) while a Russian could write anything they want without worry as long as they do it in another language?
    • by malvcr (2932649)
      Let's see.

      That "particular" law (I don't know others by now), indicates that if one person can influence a big quantity (> 3000) of the population writing something publicly in a blog, this person must be able to be monitored by the State. Also, that it is oriented to Russian speakers, and if the foreign Russian sites don't apply this law they will be blocked in Russian territory.

      It seems, as somebody said in the discussion, that they are giving blog writers the same treatment as journalists. And
  • Let all this crap be an incentive to develop better method of circumvention. The mightiest will always rule the universe.

  • Context (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Livius (318358) on Friday August 01, 2014 @11:23PM (#47587113)

    Not that it makes this kind of policy, but Russia has had authoritarian governments for 500 years. What's the US's excuse?

    • by Livius (318358)

      That should be:

      Not that it makes this kind of policy okay, but Russia has had authoritarian governments for 500 years. What's the US's excuse?

      • Russia has had authoritarian governments for 500 years. What's the US's excuse?

        Well, we haven't existed for 500 years, but give us some time -- we'll match that record!

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Post anything remotely anti-US, nomatter how off topic or wrong and get +4 insightful by default. Bigotry at work.

  • Russia has always been a very authoritarian state, even from well before Soviet times. But its a shame to see them going backwards like this. This ought to be the time for their freedoms to bloom, but alas.

  • Russia; cultivate your masculinity and say bad things about America and you too can install yourself for life.

  • From RT:
    http://rt.com/politics/177248-... [rt.com]

    Such authors will now have to register with the state watchdog Roskomnadzor, disclose their real identity and follow the same rules as journalists working in conventional state-registered mass media.

    The restrictions include the demand to verify information before publishing it and abstain from releasing reports containing slander, hate speech, extremist calls or other banned information such as, for example, advice on suicide. Also, the law bans popular blog

    • by ultranova (717540)

      I didn't know cold_fjord has kin in Russia. Small world, eh?

      • I doubt GP is Russian. It's far more likely that he's far right or far left American. These guys have been fapping on foreign oppressive regimes for a long time now, though Russia is the first one where both are fapping on it at the same time (left, because it's anti-US; right, because it's strongly conservative).

    • by q4Fry (1322209)
      Having a law against "lying**" when "truth" means "statements the government makes" is markedly different from when "truth" means objectively factual statements.

      ** I presume you are riffing here on the "slander" part of the RT snippet.
  • The government registers you.
  • by Tom (822) on Saturday August 02, 2014 @04:20AM (#47587781) Homepage Journal

    "bloggers with at least 3,000 daily readers must register with Roskomnadzor, the regulator that also oversees Russia's main media outlets."

    Ironically, it also means that bloggers are now treated the same as journalists - isn't that what they've wanted for years? ;-)

  • and it seems people care more about russia
  • Anonymous bloggers "must" register if they get over 5,000 readers? Yeah, I'm sure all the bloggers hosted on foreign sites will get right on that... Russia has not yet set up anything like the Great Firewall of China, so this requirement is utterly impossible to enforce.

    • Russia has not yet set up anything like the Great Firewall of China, so this requirement is utterly impossible to enforce.

      Actually yes, it did just that. The law requires all Russian ISPs to block sites based on the centralized blacklist maintained by the government. It is already in heavy use, though the blacklist is not nearly as pervasive as the Chinese one.

[Crash programs] fail because they are based on the theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby a month. -- Wernher von Braun

Working...