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EU Censorship Microsoft

Bing Implements Right To Be Forgotten 64

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the hide-your-shame dept.
mpicpp (3454017) writes with news that Bing has joined Google in removing search results upon request by EU citizens. From the article: The company has asked European residents, who want Microsoft to block search results that show on Bing in response to searches of their names, to fill out a four-part online form. Besides the name and country of residence of the person and the details of the pages to be blocked, the form also asks if the person is a public figure or has or expects a role that involves trust, leadership or safety. ... The information provided will help the company "consider the balance" between the applicant's individual privacy interest and the public interest in protecting free expression and the free availability of information, in line with European law, Microsoft said. You can always visit a non-EU version of Bing to receive uncensored results.
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Bing Implements Right To Be Forgotten

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  • Or is Microsoft just trying to say, "Hey, we have a search engine also. Pay attention to us."
    • by gstoddart (321705)

      That was my first thought ... all the cool kids are doing it.

      So far Google has gotten all the publicity.

      • That was my first thought ... all the cool kids are doing it.

        ...

        According to Bloomberg TV, Bing has a whopping 2.5% marketshare in the EU search market.

        • by dmbasso (1052166) on Thursday July 17, 2014 @04:09PM (#47477741)

          The feature is actually working! I had totally forgotten Bing existed!

        • by Ravaldy (2621787)

          2.5% of 18.4 Billions search ad market (as of 2013) is $460 000 000. Are you saying that's nothing?

          A growing number is usually a good indicator of a business growing. Question here is whether this increase is due to the defaults in IE or actually adoption of the search engine.

          I believe Bing's world search market share is currently 4.25% (as per global stats counter)

        • What ever Bing is, they should be working on solving the "ability to be known" problem. Solving "right to be forgotten" is fixing a problem they don't have.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Or is Microsoft just trying to say, "Hey, we have a search engine also. Pay attention to us."

      The ruling doesn't name Google specifically. (like, duh) Every search engine would be legally required to implement the "right to be forgotten".

      • by rezme (1677208)
        Yes, but can you honestly say that there would it would be noticeable if Bing didn't choose to implement it?
  • Irony (Score:5, Funny)

    by kruach aum (1934852) on Thursday July 17, 2014 @02:29PM (#47476967)

    Is there anyone who had not yet exercised their right to forget Bing?

    • by QilessQi (2044624)

      What's "Bing"?

      • Re:Irony (Score:5, Funny)

        by Archangel Michael (180766) on Thursday July 17, 2014 @02:48PM (#47477147) Journal

        Bing
        Is
        Not
        Google

        • Thanks, Mr. Michael. I've been wondering theses days where does the word "bing" come from. =)
          • by gstoddart (321705)

            I've always assumed it was the sound whatever hypothetical machine would make.

            "Recipes for turducken" ... Bing!

            You know, like where the computer in Star Trek made mechanical noises while it was thinking.

          • by RockDoctor (15477)
            Bing : (Scots)
            noun: bing; plural noun: bings

            a heap, especially of metallic ore or of waste from a mine.

            Origin : early 16th century: from Old Norse bingr âheapâ(TM).

            Example : here is a pile of useless waste [wikimedia.org] from the 19th century oil-shale workings just outside Edinburgh.

            No, seriously. Google it!

            Micro$loth's marketing department fucks it up. Again.

        • mpicpp (3454017)
          writes with news that Bing has joined Google in removing search results upon request

          As usual, Microsoft is late to the party, playing, "Me too!"

      • by dr_blurb (676176)

        What's "Bing"?

        It's a search engine named after a character in "Friends".

  • You can always visit a non-EU version of Bing to receive uncensored results.

    That's interesting. Is it the same with Google? I guess I never saw one way or another but I have assumed until now that gone from Google's results meant all of Google, not just TLDs in Europe...

    • by rahvin112 (446269)

      The gone is gone only from the country specific google domains, ie. Google.fr. You can still access the US indexes and get uncensored results although my bet is that at some point they make Google start filtering access by IP address.

  • by QuietLagoon (813062) on Thursday July 17, 2014 @02:32PM (#47476999)
    Microsoft asks google to take down a link, yet Microsoft does not remove that link from Bing. What's up with that?

    .
    Odd That Microsoft Demands Google Take Down Links That Remain In Bing [techdirt.com]

  • by jfdavis668 (1414919) on Thursday July 17, 2014 @02:42PM (#47477099)
    Can we force search engines to remember us? Some of us don't want to be forgotten.
    • by praxis (19962)

      Can we force search engines to remember us? Some of us don't want to be forgotten.

      Yes! Do something notable. Most notable people are still findable on the internets, even hundreds of years later.

  • "Hey, honey, when I did file that right to be forgotten form?"

    "I have no recollection of such event, dear."

    • by gstoddart (321705)

      Hmmmm ... I'm afraid I don't see how this passes the "is my wife a robot test?"

      Honey, have you seen my keys? "Where did you leave them?"

      Honey, have you see my wallet? "Why would I know where you left it?"

      Honey, what's for dinner? "What are you making?"

      None of these things help me tell if my wife is a robot or not. ;-)

  • This is a big step towards re-writing history. It begins with ignoring it, or by actively hiding it. I give it 1 year before we hear of attempts by politicians to cover embarrasing stories that are relevant information to the public, or before corporations hide unpleasant past events such as oil spills (corporations are people too, these days). True, search engines aren't the sole gateways to information, but nowadays people assume that if something isn't found on the first search results page it's probably not important.
    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      This is a big step towards re-writing history. It begins with ignoring it, or by actively hiding it. I give it 1 year before we hear of attempts by politicians to cover embarrasing stories that are relevant information to the public, or before corporations hide unpleasant past events such as oil spills (corporations are people too, these days). True, search engines aren't the sole gateways to information, but nowadays people assume that if something isn't found on the first search results page it's probably

      • The whole "right to be forgotten" is an implementation of the fact that over time, whatever happened people naturally forget about, and getting at those records is hard enough that the effort usually isn't worthwhile.

        Except this was not the original "right to be forgotten", which was discussed by the European Parliament and meant "I want Facebook to forget MY OWN data I provided it with". That was lobbied aside by Yahoo! and Co. This is related to a ruling by the Supreme European Court (different entity) and the press called it "right to be forgotten" putting a new meaning to an old concept. This nice little trick by the press hijacked all possibilities of debating the old meaning, which made much more sense, actually.

  • I don't believe that for a second. Everybody is censoring now. Of course in the US the laws mandating censorship are secret, cuz, you know, terrorists.

  • It was mentioned in another slashdot post that Google was perhaps undertaking some malicious compliance [1] in following the EU directive, essentially removing an article that referenced a person instead of just making his name not show the result.

    By mentioning that they have a responsibility to balance public interest verses the privacy needs of the individual, they're showing more maturity in their response than Google did.

    I don't say this too often but... props to Microsoft.

    [1] http://search.slashdot.org [slashdot.org]

  • "You can always visit a non-EU version of Bing to receive uncensored results."

    According to the US Government, they should be able to access data worldwide as long as the company operates in the US. What's stopping the EU from demanding all search pages be censored? I realize one is asking for data and the other is filtering, but it's that slippery slope. One government can do something "worldwide", what's stopping others from doing the same thing with companies that operate in their country?

  • Remember me, Internet. For all of the intelligent and the silly things I have done. Who am I kidding? Nobody cares about me.

"No, no, I don't mind being called the smartest man in the world. I just wish it wasn't this one." -- Adrian Veidt/Ozymandias, WATCHMEN

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