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Cybercriminals Ramp Up Activity Ahead of 2014 World Cup 90

Posted by samzenpus
from the crime-wave dept.
wiredmikey (1824622) writes With the FIFA World Cup 2014 kicking off this week in Brazil, cybercriminals and scammers are working hard to take advantage of visitors to the World Cup in Brazil and those following the world soccer tournament online. In recent months, several security vendors have published advisories about the various scams, phishing and malware operations that target Internet users interested in the World Cup. While individuals from all over the world have been targeted, many of the malicious campaigns focus on Brazil and neighboring South American countries. While news that cybercriminals are zoning in on a large global event is no surprise, the scale and tactics being used is quite wide in scope, ranging from malware distribution and phishing scams, to fraudulent ticket sales, spam and other promising yet fraudulent schemes.For those visiting Brazil to watch the games in person, the cyber threats also include rogue wireless access points, ATMs rigged with card skimmers and Point-of-Sale malware.
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Cybercriminals Ramp Up Activity Ahead of 2014 World Cup

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  • People will exploit any opportunity to make a quick buck out of customers anywhere. This goes to show that you must be very careful when using electronic payment and ATMS anywhere. Better security will help too.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    They have stolen over 5 brazillian dollars!

  • by nimbius (983462) on Thursday June 12, 2014 @04:21AM (#47220241) Homepage

    I mean im sure its a huge problem that people like fans and ticketholders are going to be targeted, but customers have always enjoyed being the target of crime. The real issue is that we decided to bring one of the most expensive, prestigious sports competitions with an array of elaborate infrastructure requirements and expsnsive hosting obligations to a country with a 25% poverty rate and epidemic levels of child starvation and violent crime. Sure it makes Brazillian politicians and the cloistered elite feel special but when you factor the average brazillian into the equation it was a pretty god damn wreckless decision to take two billion out of their economy and piss it away on a single sports event.

  • FIFA blew it (Score:1, Flamebait)

    by erroneus (253617)

    Brazil isn't quite "first world." They may be soccer fans, but they are rabid, brutal, dismembering, beheading, soccer fans. This is something FIFA from which should stay as far away as possible.

    Would anyone think selecting any African nation as a site for the world cup is a good idea? Brazil was a bad idea for similar reasons. "Bad Neighborhood."

    What is a "bad neighborhood" or "bad area?" We seem to try to avoid a glaringly obvious issue by blaming the surroundings instead of the people. "Don't go in

    • Would anyone think selecting any African nation as a site for the world cup is a good idea? Brazil was a bad idea for similar reasons. "Bad Neighborhood."

      Did you notice where the previous World Cup was held? That's right, South Africa. Which arguably is even "worse" than Brazil. Yet the World Cup happened, few if any tourists were mugged, raped, quartered and shot. People visited the country without particular hassle.

      While I agree that World Cup and Olympics have now transcended their function and are a cesspool of waste and corruption, denying them to poorer countries is not right. These are global events, and they deserve to be hosted globally. If then the

      • by erroneus (253617)

        I would encourage you to look closer. Just because the mainstream media didn't cover the trouble doesn't mean it didn't happen. Other news sources would disagree with your assertion that horrible things didn't happen to the visitors in S.Africa. But it is certainly true that crime was reduced while the world cup was being held, so in "relative terms" it's true. But it was also extremely temporary. They almost literally declared martial law in the region where the cup was held, but surrounding areas? N

        • I would encourage you to look closer. Just because the mainstream media didn't cover the trouble doesn't mean it didn't happen. Other news sources would disagree with your assertion that horrible things didn't happen to the visitors in S.Africa. But it is certainly true that crime was reduced while the world cup was being held, so in "relative terms" it's true. But it was also extremely temporary. They almost literally declared martial law in the region where the cup was held, but surrounding areas? Not so much. Visitors who wandered outside of designated areas did so at their own peril and were informed of such.

          The word "bubble" comes to mind.

          I was there in South Africa for the World Cup. Were you? If not, you don't get to pass off rumors as facts. And if you're one of those racist Afrikaners, your opinion means nothing because a lot of you are still living in the past.

          I don't know where this "They almost literally declared martial law" stuff comes from. I stayed in the home of some South African friends, who by the way would have been classified as "colored" in the old Apartheid system, and other than having a lot more tourists, it was

          • by erroneus (253617)

            Fact: violent crime DID happen -- just less of it
            Fact: violent crime before the world cup is a huge problem in S.Africa
            Fact: violent crime after the world cup is a huge problem in S. Africa
            Fact: a virtual martial law had to be declared in order to have any form of peace and it wasn't because of some sort of "disaster" but rather to keep the NATURAL level of violent crime down to acceptable levels.

            Please feel free to dispute any of those.

      • by erroneus (253617)

        Well, I certainly called that one. See the latest news on FIFA security woes? More of those rabid fans.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      That's a thought for the day... the week.. keep at it.

      Why don't you keep it? Brazil is just another nation which has been majorly manipulated by other nations. Now you want to blame The People who made none of the decisions for the state of their country. That's because you're one of a variety of kinds of bigot.

      • by erroneus (253617)

        Actually, it's interesting you mentioned manipulations by other nations. Turns out one of the core causes of the global banking meltdown was manipulations by other nations' banks to push for reduced regulatory limits and stuff like that. Brazil actually refused any of that and didn't suffer from the collapse. Now if you are saying that "they are allowed less participation because they didn't jump on the bandwagon to hell" then okay, I concede that point. But as far as other manipulation? Not seeing it -

  • Is the Brazillian World Cup situation significantly worse than the London Olympics for the cybercrime aspects? I might expect that 'real world face to face crime' (pickpocketing, bag theft, etc. ) might be worse as you'd expect London (as part of a wealthier country) to be better policed than a poorer country with higher levels of local corruption and poverty such as Brazil, but are there big differences between the online crime situations (fake websites, email scams, etc.)? The latter would appear to be mo

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