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AT&T Bitcoin Crime Government

AT&T Hacker 'weev' Demands One Bitcoin For Each Hour He Spent In Jail 449

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the re-arrested-on-terror-charges-in-3-2-... dept.
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "The notorious troll and hacker known as Andrew 'weev' Auernheimer spent 13 months in jail for exposing an AT&T security flaw. He was recently released when a federal court overturned the conviction on grounds of improper venue. Now, Auernheimer has penned an open letter to the Department of Justice in which he demands reparations for acts of 'fraud' and 'violence' carried out against him over the past three years. Those reparations must be paid in Bitcoin, he says — 28,296, to be exact. At current market value, that comes out to $13.7 million. The bombastic letter is titled 'Open letter to federal scum,' and was allegedly bcc'd to 'a few hundred journalists.' In it, 28-year-old Auernheimer writes that he calculated the sum owed to him based on his market value:" A gem: "Know that all this wealth will be directed towards a good and charitable cause. I am building a series of memorial groves for the greatest patriots of our generation: Timothy McVeigh, Andrew Stack, and Marvin Heemeyer. You see, In the 'Special Housing Unit,' which is Bureau of Prisons codespeak for 'solitary confinement' and 'torture,' I had enough time to think about the current state of federal government. "
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AT&T Hacker 'weev' Demands One Bitcoin For Each Hour He Spent In Jail

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  • A fifth horseman (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Qzukk (229616) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:07PM (#47057013) Journal

    Now we can watch our rights be taken away in order to punish assholes, on top of drug users, pedos, terrorists, and hackers.

    Remember folks, what the government does to weev, it can do to everyone else.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:13PM (#47057085)

      No shit? You mean the same country's government who passed the Alien and Sedition Acts, put the Japanese into concentration camps, got people fired and blacklisted for their political beliefs, etc. is more than willingly to abuse its powers? Say it aint so!!!

    • by randomErr (172078)
      The government has created a martyr. If they prosecute him again it will rally his troops. If they ignore him it will rally his troops. If they pay him off he will go away for a while.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:46PM (#47057435)

        His "troops" that is, people who think the likes of McVeigh, Stack, and Heemeyer as heroes probably doesn't need any more reason to rally. Most normal law-abiding citizens aren't going to rally behind the banner of McVeigh. He should have played the game and named a couple random founding fathers. Now he's allied himself with only those who find murdering innocent people a valid way to change the federal government (worked well didn't it?). I don't see him gaining much support.

        And why does he include Heemeyer in when speaking of federal government? Heemeyer's problem was with the local town council not the feds. He agreed to sell his property to a cement manufacturer for $250K then reneged and demanded $375K then a million. Obviously, the cement folks said fuck you and petitioned the town council to rezone an adjacent piece of land for their plant. The whole reason for Heemeyer's rampage was his own stupidity and greed. We're supposed to rally around that guy? You really want the law to allow you to go on a rampage if you, by your own greed, refuse a deal then get cut out of the final deal?

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward
          This post is far too informative and fact-based to be useful around here.
        • by slack_justyb (862874) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:41PM (#47057959)

          Yeap, this guy had a golden chance to make a cause and blew it by standing by people who kill other innocent people. Having a cause is one part knowing what to do and three parts getting the general public to like your cause. Using people who kill that general public tends to make them not like you all that much.

          • Re:A fifth horseman (Score:5, Interesting)

            by NoKaOi (1415755) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @03:10PM (#47058927)

            You see, In the 'Special Housing Unit,' which is Bureau of Prisons codespeak for 'solitary confinement' and 'torture,' I had enough time to think about the current state of federal government. "

            The guy is clearly messed up in the head from his experience (or maybe he was to some degree before, I don't know). They successfully broke him. Most likely with all that time in solitary confinement, in his mind he rallied behind the names of people who are famous for hating the government, regardless of their cause. I wonder if he can find a good psychotherapist willing to accept bitcoins.

      • by ShanghaiBill (739463) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:57PM (#47057529)

        The government has created a martyr.

        No, they have created a kook. Anyone that considers mass murders to be "patriots", and thinks that the likes of McVeigh, Stack and Heemeyer are admirable, has lost all credibility. Rather than making the government more accountable, people like this give everyone that opposes authoritarianism a bad name.

        • by bhcompy (1877290) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:06PM (#47057629)
          Honestly, it just sounds like he's picking at random, like in Die Hard.

          Karl: "Asian Dawn?"
          Hans: "I read about them in Time Magazine"
        • Re:A fifth horseman (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Penguinisto (415985) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:44PM (#47058015) Journal

          Agreed.

          Now if he named folks like Snowden, Manning, and similar (where folks could actually go "yeah - they uncovered government badness and were whistleblowers", he could have gotten at least some support.

          I mean, c'mon: he could have even stopped short and not even named anybody. At first I figured okay, he probably got a bad shake and deserves the compensation for his maltreatment. But nooo... he goes on to let his freak flag fly, and name those dumbasses as his heroes. My thoughts immediately became: "fuck that."

          Mind you, the government is still way the hell in the wrong for locking him up if all he did was uncover a security flaw (and didn't sell or exploit it for personal gain), but holy shit...

        • No, they have created a kook. Anyone that considers mass murders to be "patriots", and thinks that the likes of McVeigh, Stack and Heemeyer are admirable, has lost all credibility.

          actually, mcveigh is a terrorist mass murderer, but stack and heemeyer are fellow kooks and crazies. neither of them killed anybody. stack stole a tank from a military base in san diego and led police on a low-speed chase and crunched several parked cars (no ammunition in the tank). heermeyer had a crazy grudge with the city where he lived, so he bought a bulldozer, "armored it" by reinforcing all sides with concrete and steel, then demolished several city buildings. In both cases, these dudes died (stack k

          • Re:A fifth horseman (Score:4, Informative)

            by ShanghaiBill (739463) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:49PM (#47058663)

            neither of them killed anybody.

            Stack killed one other person besides himself. He seriously injured many more, and intended to kill them.

            stack stole a tank from a military base in san diego ...

            No he didn't. [wikipedia.org] He crashed a plane into an IRS building in Austin, Texas.

            You have him confused with Shawn Nelson [wikipedia.org].

        • by Bob9113 (14996) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:16PM (#47058329) Homepage

          >> The government has created a martyr.

          > No, they have created a kook.

          No, they have created a radical [wikipedia.org].

          Using the term "martyr" or "kook" is a judgment of merit. I agree with the latter, he's batshit looney, but it's not objective. Casting aspersions is all well and good in the popular media, but aren't we here to try to scratch a little deeper? Fine, he's a shitbag who's trying to get his ten minutes of fame and maybe ought to be back behind bars. But is he really the interesting part of the story in any sense other than lurid sensationalism?

          What we sane and self-aware citizens should be asking ourselves is not whether a lowlife deserves to be treated like scum -- of course he does, like terrorists deserve to be assassinated and child abusers deserve to be beaten. The question for us is whether we should do what we did -- not because he deserves better, but because we may have done something that is beneath us.

    • by spire3661 (1038968) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:07PM (#47057647) Journal
      Larry Flynt was an asshole i can respect, but not weev.
    • ...in order to punish assholes, on top of drug users, pedos, terrorists, and hackers.

      really??? drug users are in the same class as terrorists and pedophiles?

      jesus...with attitudes like this no wonder its so impossible for me to find any work whatsoever.

    • by UnknownSoldier (67820) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:18PM (#47058355)

      So you are saying we need to chose the lesser of the two weevils ? :-)

  • by Assmasher (456699) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:07PM (#47057015) Journal

    ..he's now Weev 2.0 - now with added 'crazy'!

    • by rahvin112 (446269) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:24PM (#47057223)

      Prison does that. Americans are so interested in retribution and punishment that they forget what can happen to someone you treat like an animal, particularly given that said person will be released some day. The ironic part is that death row inmates are treated far better.

      • We need to stop letting sociopaths run our prisons. We should be giving all candidates psychological tests to make sure they're all compassionate people interested in keeping their prisoners safe and rehabilitating them so they can turn their lives around. Of course if you push for this, there are a ton of right-wing lunatics that will embarrass themselves by calling you "a bleeding-heart liberal." It's hard to reform society when many terrible people vote.
        • by Sperbels (1008585)
          Well, if the rumored prisoner/guard experiments are true, even compassionate guards turn into animals when given the opportunity.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          There's plenty of things wrong with our prison systems. There should be less effort spent on "punishment" and more time spent on education and reform. I'm not talking about Clockwork Orange type of reform; I'm talking about getting these criminals into a class room and teaching them something. Not just the basics like reading, math, and history, but also a trade.

          This is critically important. Imagine some guy who had a hard time making a living. He held up a as station at gunpoint to grab a few hundred bucks

        • by Curunir_wolf (588405) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:50PM (#47058669) Homepage Journal

          We need to stop letting sociopaths run our prisons. We should be giving all candidates psychological tests to make sure they're all compassionate people interested in keeping their prisoners safe and rehabilitating them so they can turn their lives around. Of course if you push for this, there are a ton of right-wing lunatics that will embarrass themselves by calling you "a bleeding-heart liberal." It's hard to reform society when many terrible people vote.

          Not gonna help. We know now from sociological experiments [wikipedia.org] that the environment turns nearly all the guards into sociopaths. It's a structural problem, not a people problem.

          But the most pressing issue with our prison industrial complex is the sheer volume of citizens that are subjected to it. The US has the largest prison population by far in the entire world, both by numbers and proportion of the population. And that is directly attributable to the police-state infrastructure created and perpetuated by the Federal government, just like Weev has stated.

          • The US has the largest prison population by far in the entire world, both by numbers and proportion of the population. And that is directly attributable to the police-state infrastructure created and perpetuated by the Federal government

            Now and again the geek needs to be reminded of how federalism really works in the US.

            The prison population of the US varies enormously by state. But the states of the desert Southwest and the old Southern Confederacy are right up there --- and it is damn hard to see them following the federal lead on anything.

            Here is a small sampling:

            Prisoners per 100,000 population

            1 Louisiana 867
            5 Texas 648
            7 Florida 556
            14 Virginia 468
            20 California 448
            39 New York 288
            41 Washington 269
            48 Massachusetts 200
            50 Maine 148

            List of U.S. states by incarceration rate [wikipedia.org]

      • by Ichijo (607641) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:51PM (#47058093) Homepage Journal

        Governments should assess the societal cost of each inmate who continues to commit crimes and offer half of that to the prison if the inmate emerges properly rehabilitated, perhaps in lieu of the normal per-inmate payments. This would make the profit motive work for us rather than against us as crime is lowered and our streets become safer.

        Of course it might result in prisons wanting to release some murderers early because they've been rehabilitated, and some prisons may even refuse some shoplifters if they think the cost of rehabilitating them outweighs the societal cost of them stealing a pack of gum every once in a while, but would either of these results really be so bad?

    • by timeOday (582209) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:34PM (#47057325)
      Yeah, nobody sane is going to sympathize with Timothy McVeigh.

      His reference to solitary confinement caught my attention. There was a recent Frontline on solitary confinement [pbs.org]. It is scary. It is a modern-day dungeon. These guys are so messed up there is nothing to do but lock them up and throw away the key, which messes them up even further. The convicts certainly aren't blameless to begin with, but we are over-doing it. I non-violent hacker (if that's what "weev" is/was) should not be there.

      • by Assmasher (456699)

        I totally agree.

        I can't imagine a scenario where sensory deprivation does anything other than make things worse. I can understand separating them from the population and taking away privileges, but there should be some basic privileges that you simply don't take away - otherwise you get 'crazy' more often than not (it would seem.)

        • by FlyHelicopters (1540845) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:43PM (#47057401)

          We all know this, but no one cares enough to actually do anything about it...

          A government powerful enough to give you everything you need is powerful enough to take everything you have...

          That isn't something taught in public schools of course, but it should be...

          • by Assmasher (456699)

            I always wondered that with the recidivism rate so high and the cost of housing inmates so high, solving the post-release job/hiring issues by offering employers who employ ex-convicts an annual/monthly tax break for employing them.

            At rates of over 70% nationally for many crimes, offering 70% of half of that cost to employers annually would be interesting. Offering them nearly a thousand dollars a month in tax breaks for each convict employed at some specified pay rate...?

            Surely, less difficulty in securin

  • Bitcoin ? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by psergiu (67614) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:09PM (#47057033)

    Why Bitcoin and not Dogecoin (or any other e-currency) ?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      1) 28,296 Dogecoin is only worth about $13.

      2) He doesn't want government-issued currency because he feels this would be paying into the system that oppressed him, and Bitcoin is the most popular private currency.

      3) Dogecoin changed their money supply from fixed to infinite this year, so it's probably not safe enough to store millions of dollars. It's more of a joke/tip currency.

    • by Bob9113 (14996)

      Why Bitcoin and not Dogecoin (or any other e-currency) ?

      My guess would be he wanted to use the one with the most penetration, because his real objective (or at least a simultaneous objective) is to do a little crowdbusking.

      As a side note; he may be little more than an irritating troll, but it will be interesting to see where this goes. Think of him as a walking, flaming, honeypot.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Hognoxious (631665)

        My guess would be he wanted to use the one with the most penetration

        Probably not his favourite word these days.

    • You can't buy drugs with Dogecoin. At least I don't think you can. Can someone with better knowledge of black-market sites chime in?
    • by PRMan (959735)
      Because you can actually USE bitcoin? You know...to BUY things? Doge is a joke.
  • Timothy McVeigh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by berj (754323) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:10PM (#47057049)

    Wow.. good role model there.. Timothy McVeigh. I repeat.. Wow.

    • by Zantac69 (1331461)
      No kidding...

      weev can get bent.
    • Re:Timothy McVeigh (Score:4, Insightful)

      by drakaan (688386) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:15PM (#47057111) Homepage Journal
      Yeah...I was borderline sympathetic up until that point. What a douche.
      • All it means is he has the balls to troll both online and offline.
      • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:07PM (#47057645)

        Just because his conviction wasn't proper, doesn't mean he's not an asshat, or even that he didn't break the law. Note that his conviction was overturned because of the venue (meaning it was tried in the wrong court) not because of a problem with the charge or evidence. Now that's a good thing, the state needs to do everything properly in a trial, and if they fail to do so, the defendant gets to walk. That is a cornerstone of the American justice system.

        This is just him showing more asshattery, and a pretty good indication that his time free is likely to be only temporary. Anyone with that level of delusion and self grandeur is likely to do something illegal again, and sooner rather than later, and the state will probably make sure to do everything right the second time around.

        Like a friend of mine used to work in the PD's office. He got a client who had been arrested for tagging (graffiti) since a cop stopped him and found sharpie markers in his pockets. The kid had sure as shit been tagging and had used said markers to do it, but the cop hadn't seen that, and had no reason to search him, so my friend got it tossed out. So what happened? Same kid went and tagged again, but this time the cops watched him do it and caught him in the act. The kid was miffed my friend couldn't do anything the second time.

    • Yeah, unbeweevable.

    • by meerling (1487879)
      Yeah, and demand letters like that, especially when sent to bloody everybody including a whole packload of journalists are not a good sign regarding his mental health. I read the letter, and it's not as bad as some of the 'letters', rants, and 'manifestos' dangerous nutbags have used, but it's close enough to the earlier ones to be worrying.

      To abuse an old quote, "Get thee to a nuttery!". No, seriously, get this guy some mental healthcare before he does something totally psycho and irrevocable.
    • McVey was just stupid enough to be unbelievably lucky, or he was a patsy.

      • It doesn't take a lot of brain-power to make a bomb, kill a bunch of innocent people, and get caught.

        We'd be a lot safer if only smart people could cause us harm, but stupid people are just as dangerous.
    • by jxander (2605655)

      In case the point was missed, Weev is a well renowned troll.

      We have every reason to believe that the whole tirade was a setup to get people on that emotional roller coaster of "YEAH, he's right, the government is totally... wait, what?? Who?"

      For the lulz

  • by PvtVoid (1252388) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:13PM (#47057093)
    That's going to work.
    • It kind of works for AT&T, Verizon, et. al. They are perhaps slightly more polite "Pay me my money, or else I'll throttle your bandwidth", but the implication that we're subhuman garbage is clear.

  • Weev is ruining it for everyone with his egotistical douch-nozzle approach to this whole thing.

    I support *everything* Weev is doing, from a conceptual standpoint.

    That's where it ends...this stupid letter shows what happens to a good mind when all other voices are shut out internally.

    WE MUST CONNECT WITH OTHER PEOPLE NOT BROWBEAT THEM WITH OUR SUPERIORITY

    I mean...if we ever want to win this fight...

  • by Stumbles (602007) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:17PM (#47057125)
    Really? Those three deserve hommage by Stuckey? Stack intentionally [wikipedia.org] flies his plane into a building kill several. Heemeyer has fun with a bulldozer [wikipedia.org]. And worst of all in some respects, McVeigh detonates a bomb [wikipedia.org] killing a hundred plus people. If those are the types you admire as worthy of a memorial then you have one warped sense of admiration. None of those even come close to fitting the description of a patriot.
    • > None of those even come close to fitting the description of a patriot.

      Most of the people claiming to be patriots these days are anything but. It's always selfish, clueless people who are engaging in fantasy role-playing to pretend that they're better than quality people.
    • by Sarten-X (1102295)

      Let's not forget the "patriots" who destroyed others' legal property [wikipedia.org] in protest against their rightful government. What's the difference, anyway?

      ...the difference is that the patriots of the American Revolution spent a few decades lobbying and writing essays before any violence, pursuing a diplomatic resolution even after the fighting broke out.

      In my opinion, patriots don't just promote some message. They stand for and live by the ideals of their country, even if their government doesn't. For an American, t

      • Let's not forget the "patriots" who destroyed others' legal property [wikipedia.org] in protest against their rightful government. What's the difference, anyway?

        ...the difference is that the patriots of the American Revolution spent a few decades lobbying and writing essays before any violence, pursuing a diplomatic resolution even after the fighting broke out.

        No, the difference is that nobody got killed by the Boston Tea Party. Also American society mostly backed the Boston Tea Party and its goals. You can't really make that claim that the majority of Americans were sympathetic to the other 3 cited cases. When society says "You're wrong and crazy" that is a difference.

    • by Megane (129182)

      Stack intentionally flies his plane into a building kill several.

      Not several. He hit a break room. He killed himself and one guy who was just getting a cup of coffee.

    • Weeve is not a brave kind of guy, he's a griefer and a fool; smart, but makes bad decisions. A lot of hackers do. [cyberpunk.ru] By choosing that list of people, he's trying to scare government agents from doing it again to him. He doesn't understand the world well enough to understand how to get what he wants. Threatening violence against the government is not going to help, but he thinks it will because it's helped against other people in the past.
  • That the court overturned the conviction on grounds of improper venue does not prevent the Gub'ment from going after him again in the "proper" venue. If he makes himself enough of a pain, it could be sooner rather than later. Certainly they are watching him closely now.

  • by paiute (550198) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:22PM (#47057195)
    The prison library called to say there was an overdue book on his account:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H... [wikipedia.org]
  • by Morpeth (577066) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:23PM (#47057199)

    I absolutely detest the state of things right now, the NSA/Snowden revelations, corporations/lobbyists running the gov't, rights being ignored, etc. BUT that said, TImothy McVeigh was a murderer... including 18 children:

    Peachlyn Bradley, 3, Oklahoma City
    Gabreon D.L. Bruce, 3 months, Oklahoma City
    Ashley Megan Eckles, 4, Guthrie
    Baylee Almon, 1, Oklahoma City
    Danielle Nicole Bell, 15 months, Oklahoma City
    Zachary Taylor Chavez, 3, Oklahoma City
    Anthony Christopher Cooper II, 2, Moore
    Antonio Ansara Cooper Jr., 6 months, Midwest City
    Aaron M. Coverdale, 5 1/2, Oklahoma City
    Elijah S. Coverdale, 2 1/2, Oklahoma City
    Jaci Rae Coyne, 14 months, Moore
    Taylor Santoi Eaves, 8 months, Midwest City
    Tevin D'Aundrae Garrett, 16 months, Midwest City
    Kevin "Lee" Gottshall II, 6 months, Norman
    Blake Ryan Kennedy, 1 1/2, Amber
    Dominique Ravae (Johnson)-London, 2, Oklahoma City
    Chase Dalton Smith, 3, Oklahoma City
    Colton Wade Smith, 2, Oklahoma City

    Many people are angry and frustrated, but please read those names and ages and tell me again about his 'heroism'?

    • While I agree with the sentiment that thinking of somebody like McVeigh as an absolute hero, I don't think the reason for that should be hinging on the fact that children died in the attack. It's a bomb. It's about as non-discriminatory as weapons go.

      Assume no children died, would that somehow qualify him as being a hero after all?
      What about teenager Cartney McRaven, age 19?

      What about Kathy Cregan, Rheta Long, Laura Garrison, LutherTreanor, Olen Bloomer, Calvin Battle, Norma Johnson, Donald Burns Sr., Don

    • He attacked a federal building. Or as Obama and Bush say "Collateral Damage".

      But I get you, it is only "murder" when it is a foreign terrorist organization, not an American one.

    • by spire3661 (1038968) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:13PM (#47057693) Journal
      Dont use 'children' to prop up your argument. The adults lives in the building were just as valuable. Using 'children' language is News-Speak.
      • by Morpeth (577066) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:49PM (#47058075)

        I didn't say the adults lives weren't valuable, so don't put words into my mouth. There is NO way an infant or toddler could make ANY choice or cause ANY action that could in any way be a threat to McVeigh. Hence my pointing them out. It's not a prop or news-speak, sorry you're so cynical.

        While I don't in any sense condone ANYTHING he did, he could try to argue adults can make choices or actions that in some whacky way he could attempt to rationalize as a threat -- my point of bringing up the kids, is that they had ZERO, absolutely ZERO to do with whatever beef he had in his twisted mind.

      • Is that there is no way they were complicit in anything.

        So the crazy nutball shithead argument for the OKC bombing is something along the lines of the government being evil, the workers in that building being part of some government conspiracy, etc, etc. You can see that kind of bullshit logic in one of the other replies to the grandparent, who talks about "McVeigh's actual targets" and gets all conspiracy nut as though it was the government's fault.

        Ok fine, but even if you accept that BS, there's the issue

  • He was convicted of a crime (assuming his guilt was established correctly) and the case was overturned on a 'venue' law, so, why the fck does anyone care about this exactly? That a douche tries to one-up his haters? If I wanted that, I'd read more Rob Ford. That's a guy with actual train-wreck entertainment value.

  • by MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:26PM (#47057235)

    I would agree to pay him, but while negotiating the payment, I would make sure the IRS got word.

    Can anyone say "audit".

  • He was recently released when a federal court overturned the conviction on grounds of improper venue.

    Which means his case can retried elsewhere. He cannot claim "double jeopardy."

    if the government fails to produce adequate evidence to prove an element of the crime, then the defendant is acquitted and the government doesn't get another bite at the apple. But this has nothing to do with a conviction being vacated because of a procedural error.

    Does Double Jeopardy Forestall Auernheimer's Retrial? [lawtheories.com]

  • by The Raven (30575) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:28PM (#47057251) Homepage
    But still pointless, useless, and self-destructive. The letter is bad enough that if he denied writing it, I would believe that it was a character assassination attempt. The guy didn't deserve prison, but he's still an idiot.
  • Im no psychologist (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nimbius (983462) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:40PM (#47057375) Homepage
    But Mister Weev seems a touch frustrated by the machinations of the american legal system as they pertain to billion dollar monopolies. The US Government has granted retroactive immunity to AT&T for a cornucopia of offenses with such timeliness as to be indistinguishable from an NTP stratum. Given the historical context in which AT&T has consistently operated, it would be no surprise if the government not only categorically refused payment, but retroactively enacted legislation ensuring Weev was guilty.
    • by sconeu (64226)

      it would be no surprise if the government not only categorically refused payment, but retroactively enacted legislation ensuring Weev was guilty

      Google "Ex Post Facto" and "Bill of Attainder". Now granted, the US.gov has been using the Constitution (or at least the Bill of Rights), as toilet paper; but even the Roberts court would choke on declaring such legislation Constitutional.

  • I am building a series of memorial groves for the greatest patriots of our generation: Timothy McVeigh, Andrew Stack, and Marvin Heemeyer. You see, In the 'Special Housing Unit,' which is Bureau of Prisons codespeak for 'solitary confinement' and 'torture,' I had enough time to think about the current state of federal government. "

    And tell me, as an innocent person who got harmed, did you have any time to think about people being harmed when McVeigh murdered them, in spite of them being innocent third parti

  • Timothy McVeigh (Score:4, Insightful)

    by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland@ya ... m minus math_god> on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:19PM (#47057735) Homepage Journal

    was a coward.

    • Sorry friend, McVeigh was no coward. If he was so cowardly, he wouldn't have taken the risks he did in the first place and he wouldn't have been as easily caught. He was so anti gov he didn't have plates on the car and if he had any sense or fear he'd have not let such things make him stand out so easily. Besides, given his motives, he was trying to inspire a revolution which if at all successful would have given him an outlet to do more "cowardly" insurgent tactics. He didn't cry like a baby when they ex

  • by John Pfeiffer (454131) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:30PM (#47057857) Homepage

    Man, having never heard of this guy before, I was rather sympathetic and thinking "Man, finally a use for all those FBI-confiscated Bitcoins" until that last part about Tim McVeigh... Then all I could think was "Uh...wow, screw this asshat."

  • by Karl Cocknozzle (514413) <kcocknozzle@hotmail . c om> on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:06PM (#47058211) Homepage

    I was with him right up until he revealed his love of deranged, hillbilly trash like McVeigh. Weev did get a raw deal, but it is worth mentioning that the people in the justice system (that run it) are in fact people, and people (flawed as they are) love seeing assholes (like Weev) get their comeuppance. And given what an asshole he is, I'd say that comeuppance was a long time coming.

    But hey, good news for him: He now has a legitimate cause to fight for the rest of his life. If this keeps him from discrediting other causes through his support (this manifesto essentially makes Weev completely toxic to any political activism on any topic, forever, period) then we should consider it a net win.

  • by GameboyRMH (1153867) <gameboyrmhNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:25PM (#47058419) Journal

    So I assume he shits out gold bars for a living?

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