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Ask Slashdot: Getting an Uncooperative Website To Delete One's Account? 171

Posted by timothy
from the if-you-reply-to-a-phantom-comment-do-you-exist? dept.
First time accepted submitter trentfoley writes "I've been trying to clean up my digital life (insert joke about having a life) and have run into a situation I fear is too common. Many social websites, nextdoor.com in particular, do not allow a user to delete the account they created. In the case of nextdoor.com, their privacy policy makes it clear that the user owns all of their data. If this is true, I should have the right to destroy that data. These lines of thought brought to mind the recent privacy defeat in Europe. Does the defeat of the EU's Right-to-be-Forgotten legislation bring a practical end to this debate?" I've read complaints today from Nextdoor.com users who say their data was sold, too.
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Ask Slashdot: Getting an Uncooperative Website To Delete One's Account?

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  • call them (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Karmashock (2415832) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @05:59PM (#45807745)

    I've gotten a lot of sites that don't let you delete accounts to delete the account by simply calling them. Their numbers are often hard to find but get them on the phone and ask nicely.

    • Re:call them (Score:5, Informative)

      by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:03PM (#45807769) Homepage Journal

      Common advice for getting that big social networking site to respond to requests is to mail a paper letter to their HQ, possibly attn: legal affairs. Apparently the success rate is very high.

      • Re:call them (Score:5, Informative)

        by lister king of smeg (2481612) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:31PM (#45807967)

        Common advice for getting that big social networking site to respond to requests is to mail a paper letter to their HQ, possibly attn: legal affairs. Apparently the success rate is very high.

        another good way is if there is a place to put age set is as under 12 many will delete it immediately due to law concerning keeping data about children.

      • Yup. Works for most companies, since legal people tend to take (well-written and informed) documents seriously.

        • Re:call them (Score:5, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 28, 2013 @08:19PM (#45808537)

          FYI:

          Entity Name: NEXTDOOR.COM, INC.
          Entity Number: C3063398
          Date Filed: 01/24/2008
          Status: ACTIVE
          Jurisdiction: DELAWARE
          Entity Address: 101 SPEAR STREET SUITE 230
          Entity City, State, Zip: SAN FRANCISCO CA 94105
          Agent for Service of Process: WILSON CHAN
          Agent Address: 101 SPEAR ST STE 230
          Agent City, State, Zip: SAN FRANCISCO CA 94105

    • Re:call them (Score:4, Informative)

      by plover (150551) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:06PM (#45807785) Homepage Journal

      Being nice is generally the key to resolving these things quickly and in your favor. Come in threatening lawsuits, and they'll ignore you until you actually engage a lawyer (at your own expense. )

    • Re:call them (Score:5, Interesting)

      by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:06PM (#45807787)

      And if that doesn't work then change as much as you can. Your email address should be the easiest. Then any other personal information that you can alter. If they won't delete it then make it worthless to them.

      And this is another reason to fight against the current trend of requiring real names for accounts.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        And change the photos, and put nasty notes (they lie, you don't really have control of your account, etc.) in watermarks on the photos, and add new such photos. Do it slowly, a little each day for a couple months. Then just let it sit without warning them. Then don't delete it even if they want you to and re-create it each time they delete it. Create new accounts wilh nothing but bogus information using burner email accounts. Make them wish they had treated you right, even once they start treating you

      • Re:call them (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 28, 2013 @08:06PM (#45808479)

        I've never given correct information to any website to start. It was completely obvious that they would use that information to their advantage as that is what capitalist corporations *do*.

        Was there ever an advantage to me having the information with them? Is the information needed for them to perform a service for me? If the answer to those questions is no, then they get BS info, and a lower level password I keep in a protected space with all the rest.

        If a company truly needs correct information from me, then I'm considerably more careful. However, that is actually quite rare. In most cases I can obfuscate and lie about my identity, even with paid services. Although they are working to plug those "meta" holes by heavily restricting just what you can purchase with prepaid credit cards, money orders, etc.

        Social Networking is just plain dangerous when the information is centralized, and I never fell for it. It didn't matter what they were offering. I'm only interested in a completely decentralized, encrypted, p2p model similar to OneSocialMedia and Diaspora. Basically, if the infrastructure is inherently resistant towards surveillance and monetization by hostile parties (I consider advertising and marketing to be extremely hostile to my life) then I'm interested.

        This post is a question about how to mitigate or outright reverse the damage to the person's privacy. I'm not sure that is really possible at all. More than likely, it's Pandora's box.

        The answer is to have never danced with devil in the pale moonlight in the first place.

        Here, just like other places, I purposefully choose identities that have conflicting data sets when you search for it. I know that I'm not 100% protected, but if they want to violate my privacy, they will have to work pretty damn hard to do it.

        • by TrollstonButterbeans (2914995) on Sunday December 29, 2013 @01:11AM (#45809655)
          "The answer is to have never danced with devil in the pale moonlight in the first place."

          Ugh. Extra Cheese post of the year finalist.
        • > I've never given correct information to any website to start.

          My electric power bill, my garbage, other services are all website paperless situations. So I give websites correct info in some situations.

          I also buy things online all the time from places like Amazon, you have to give them your address and name or the stuff won't come to you.

          The thing that bugs me is when they mail catalogs to me ENDLESSLY. Paper catalogs. I mean, I browsed their website and bought their product, so I know the
      • by RockDoctor (15477)

        Then any other personal information that you can alter. If they won't delete it then make it worthless to them.

        I'm almost tempted to find out Bill Gate's appropriate personal information.

        Or the CEO of [insert offending social website's controlling corporation].

    • Re:call them (Score:5, Interesting)

      by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Saturday December 28, 2013 @10:17PM (#45809007) Homepage

      Be prepared to spend a long time on the phone though, and even then they often won't really delete your account. I tried this with Apple recently as I had an ancient account from back when I had an early iPod a decade ago. It took half an hour on the phone, I had to listen to endless dire warnings about losing all the data on "my" iCloud account that they made for me without my knowledge or ever agreeing to the terms and conditions. Endless stuff about how all my iTunes purchases with DRM would commit suicide (I never made any) and how all my devices would stop working (battery died years ago, can't be bothered to pry the thing open to replace it, if you can even buy 3rd gen iPod batteries any more).

      After all that they finally agreed to delete the account, but added that I would never be able to sign up with the same email address again... So they were not really deleting it. My personal details are still on file somewhere. In the new year I'm going to write to them to demand they expunge everything.

      Long story short, we need that EU right to be forgotten and some strong enforcement.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        It's possible they might be legally obligated to retain some of that data.
        • I don't know why you were modded down. I believe most banking is legally required to retain every customer transaction for 7 years. What does it exactly mean to "delete your Wells Fargo Online Account" when they are legally required to maintain your records?

          If at any point your relationship involves a financial transaction, that company might have a valid interest in holding onto the receipts through at least the next year's taxes, and may have a responsibility to hold the records for longer.
    • by Joce640k (829181)

      Learn your lesson: Never type real information into a website. Name, rank, number. That's it.

      • by wirefarm (18470)

        One funny side effect of feeding Facebook red herrings is that for a while, I was getting ads targeted at dating for Latvian seniors

  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdot AT hackish DOT org> on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:03PM (#45807773)

    Discussion lists traditionally don't give you a right to delete previous postings: Usenet and mailing list archives are forever. One rationale is simply technical inability (archives aren't controlled by a central authority), but there's also a sense that deleting miscellaneous posts from archives fragments the record of past conversations.

    So, Nextdoor has forums and discussions. It seems fair to me that they don't retroactively delete posts from those. Therefore they need to maintain some kind of attribution to the now-deleted account. So they can't fully delete the account, in the sense of wiping any traces, but they could just make it a non-operable "deactivated" account that still has the posts attributed, but can't be used anymore. They might agree to hide the profile in this case, as well. Turns out, that is precisely what they do support [nextdoor.com].

    • So, Nextdoor has forums and discussions. It seems fair to me that they don't retroactively delete posts from those. Therefore they need to maintain some kind of attribution to the now-deleted account. So they can't fully delete the account, in the sense of wiping any traces, but they could just make it a non-operable "deactivated" account that still has the posts attributed, but can't be used anymore.

      Understood.

      But if the policy explicitly tells you that your additions are your property, than this argument doesn't work.

      • by calzones (890942)

        Many discussion forums I've been a part of allow deleting your own posts. Some even allow editing. That they don't give you a mechanism to blindly mass-delete posts wouldn't change your ownership rights over them.

        For that matter, "ownership" rights may simply mean that you retain copyright over the posts. This doesn't mean you get to somehow magically make them all vanish on a whim -- no more than an author can go out and change or magically vanish copies of books already in other people's possession.

      • by lgw (121541) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:27PM (#45807939) Journal

        George Lucas was (at least until recently) the owner of the Star Wars Christmas Special. That doesn't give him the right to destroy all tapes made of it in the world. (Much as he wanted to - rumor has it he bought up and destroyed a great many copies before the digital age made it pointless)

        Ownership isn't the right to "unpublish".

        • Websites "publish" when they broadcast html. Ownership of copyright means you should be able to stop publishing new html, which is what this guy asks.

          • The contract probably grants the site a license to display the user's posts publicly in perpetuity. Ownership of copyright doesn't mean you have to be able to revoke licenses already granted. For example, once I click Submit, I grant a license to Rob^W Ando^W VA^W Sour^W Geekn^W Dice that I can't revoke.
          • by ckedge (192996)

            > Ownership of copyright means you should be able to stop publishing new html

            Just because you own the copyright doesn't mean you get to demand that everyone in the world burn the books you sold them.

      • by w_dragon (1802458)
        Saying they're your property most likely just means that you retain copyright. In order to store, backup, and display the messages you must have granted some license to the site. Otherwise you could just issue dmca takedown requests for all your posts.
      • I haven't read the agreement but it probably gives them the right to use the information that remains your property forever.

        If you've given someone the right to use a piece of your information forever, why would they let you delete it?

    • by khasim (1285)

      Not exactly. From that link:

      If you later decide that you would like to reactivate your account, you can do so at any time by signing in to Nextdoor using the same email address and password as before, and then clicking Reactivate.

      So everything is still there.

      Why not kill the account completely except for the past posts? And put the username and email address into a do-not-allow list so that a future user won't be able to take it over.

      The reason is that they want to be able to sell your information.

      • by chill (34294)

        Data Modification/Deletion. You can delete your account by contacting us. Alternatively, you can delete most types of individual Content items. Deleting your account will delete all Content you provided, except that we may choose to retain Content incorporated into the neighborhood's conversations (and, as applicable, nearby neighborhoods); and we may attribute that Content to your name even after you depart. If we allow you to change neighborhoods on our site, we may retain your conversation contributions in your old neighborhood and nearby neighborhoods (and keep the attribution to your name) but allow you to move your profile to your new neighborhood. If you are the subject of an unauthorized profile, please contact us.

        I can see where discussion sites don't allow for deletion as it is a royal PITA to maintain site integrity, threads, etc. if a user disappears.

        Take Slashdot for example...

        • by khasim (1285)

          I can see where discussion sites don't allow for deletion as it is a royal PITA to maintain site integrity, threads, etc. if a user disappears.

          It should be easy. Since all the posts should be in a database, just replace the content with something like --self-deleted-- and keep everything else the same.

          For anyone quoting it from before it was deleted I'd say "fair use" if they're in the USofA.

          Take your account:
          chill (34294)
          Leave the user number the same (34294) and just --self-deleted-- the user name (chill)

          • by chill (34294)

            Yes.

            An interesting post is here [tutsplus.com] on how to create a forum from scratch. The use of foreign keys to control this sort of referential deletion is part of the article. A pretty good primer, actually.

    • Usenet and mailing list archives are forever

      This isn't necessarily true. I worked at a place where the CEO came across some archived mailing-list posts that contained sensitive company information (apparently the previous sysadmin didn't have much regard for keeping sensitive company information secret when he had questions). An email or two asking them nicely to remove the content and it was gone. Granted, if it had been propagated to many other archive sites, this could have been a major pain in the ass.

  • by turkeydance (1266624) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:07PM (#45807795)
    could be classified a delusional state.
  • by PktLoss (647983) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:09PM (#45807811) Homepage Journal

    I'm often interested in deleting accounts I don't use to avoid handing over my data to attackers when their systems are breached. The more sites I've given my data to, the more likely some random attack that grabs a DB dump is to have a copy of my Name, Email, (hashed)? password, etc. Depending on the type of site it may even get some bonus data in the form of answers to security questions.

    This sounds lame, but the amount of spam currently directed at the accounts I used on: the motley fool, eharmony, Adobe, is quite high. Just putting my name at the top makes it that much more likely I'll be scammed by some phishing email.

  • Do what you can (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nospam007 (722110) * on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:10PM (#45807821)

    Change all your details in the account settings, name, address, email etc.

    Then, deactivate the account like they tell you in their help on their site.

    http://help.nextdoor.com/customer/portal/articles/805273-deactivating-your-account [nextdoor.com]

    That's about it. Not even Slashdot will erase your old posts when you decide to quit here, nobody does that, it would ruin all the past conversations.

    • by nospam007 (722110) *

      Sorry forgot to post another line:

      "If you'd like to deactivate your account altogether, you can do so through Account Settings. (Note: If you do not see the link to deactivate on this page, contact Support.)"

      • If you'd like to deactivate your account altogether ...

        And there's the point:
        The policy says he owns the data.

        Deactivation is different than deletion. If you own the data, you should be able to do what you want with it, right?

        Otherwise a site should not imply of they that the user "owns" the data.

        • It doesn't imply anything. It's very clear.

          From Nextdoor Member Agreement [nextdoor.com]:

          Content. You retain all ownership rights to the text, photos, video and other content you submit to Nextdoor.com (collectively, your “Content”). We can publish your Content in your neighborhood website or to nearby neighborhoods as described in our privacy policy [nextdoor.com].

          From Nextdoor Privacy Policy [nextdoor.com]:

          In some cases, we may limit your ability to edit or remove Content from Nextdoor.com.

        • by djmurdoch (306849)

          If you own the data, you should be able to do what you want with it, right?

          Sure, you can sell copies to other people, too. You've already sold a copy to them.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

      If they are anything like Facebook then deactivation is meaningless. Facebook keeps all your personal data and history on file. Changing your details doesn't help, they keep a full history of every name you ever used, every date of birth, every status update. When the site finally goes under and they sell off your data that info will be in there.

      Apple needed an engineer to go in and manually delete most of my account. I imagine the situation here will be the same; someone has to remove all the historical da

  • This is not at all uncommon, unfortunately. Even sites that let you delete your account, complete with a warning about not being able to recover it later, rarely actually delete it (and often have no issue reactivating it later). The problem is that it's basically up to each site to determine how they store user data, through ToS and EULA's that haven't exactly been found to be legally binding or enforceable. There's also no basic expectation for consumers as a result of the lack of such regulations.

    You'

  • Violate the TOS (Score:5, Informative)

    by crmanriq (63162) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:18PM (#45807873)

    Well. As a last resort.
    1) Change all of your user data that you can. Edit your profile so that all of the data is either blank, or not yours at all.
    2) Edit your age down to below 13 years old. This may kick in automatic account privacy settings.
    3) If none of this works, then look at the TOS and find things that they don't want you to do. (ie, Wikipedia freaks out if you mention suing them on any forum. A TOS might make it a violation to badmouth the parent company, or to solicit other users. You might think of creating a couple of throwaway accounts, and getting into a royal flamewar with your invisible clones. Call them really bad names. Threaten to sue them.)
    4) Do not let number three go into the realm of anything illegal. Don't post porn in public fora. You simply want to make yourself unwelcome at this location.

    • by jklovanc (1603149)

      2) Edit your age down to below 13 years old. This may kick in automatic account privacy settings.

      Some sites won't allow you to do that.

      3) If none of this works, then look at the TOS and find things that they don't want you to do. (ie, Wikipedia freaks out if you mention suing them on any forum. A TOS might make it a violation to badmouth the parent company, or to solicit other users. You might think of creating a couple of throwaway accounts, and getting into a royal flamewar with your invisible clones. Call them really bad names. Threaten to sue them.)

      All the site will do is disable the account, delete the bad posts through the normal moderation process and keep the good posts. You will be no further ahead.

  • by Dr_Barnowl (709838) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:25PM (#45807925)

    In the UK, the Data Protection Act requires that they delete your data on request.

    • by Chrisq (894406)

      In the UK, the Data Protection Act requires that they delete your data on request.

      But nextdoor.com is a US company that has no divisions or operations in the EU - so it does not apply

    • by jklovanc (1603149)

      There are eight tets [ico.org.uk] to pass to Since the name is the only thing displayed after an account is deactivated the posts it fails the first test

  • Ownership (Score:5, Informative)

    by jklovanc (1603149) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @06:52PM (#45808071)

    There are many comments about the ownership of the posts and how if the poster owned the posts he should be able to delete them. I have a different view.

    From the Nextdoor Member Agreement [nextdoor.com]:

    Content. You retain all ownership rights to the text, photos, video and other content you submit to Nextdoor.com (collectively, your “Content”). We can publish your Content in your neighborhood website or to nearby neighborhoods as described in our privacy policy.

    Notice they say rights. The poster owns the posts in that the poster is responsible for the content and the site can not sell or copy the posts to other sites. Those are the general copyright laws. The issue comes in that by posting on the site the owner has given a copy to someone else, much like giving someone a book. The poster still owns the right to the post but not ownership of that specific copy.

    This is from the Privacy Policy [nextdoor.com]:

    Data Modification/Deletion. You can delete your account by contacting us. Alternatively, you can delete most types of individual Content items. Deleting your account will delete all Content you provided, except that we may choose to retain Content incorporated into the neighborhood's conversations (and, as applicable, nearby neighborhoods); and we may attribute that Content to your name even after you depart. If we allow you to change neighborhoods on our site, we may retain your conversation contributions in your old neighborhood and nearby neighborhoods (and keep the attribution to your name) but allow you to move your profile to your new neighborhood. If you are the subject of an unauthorized profile, please contact us.

    It looks pretty explicit that they will retain conversations.

  • And a pony (Score:2, Insightful)

    by radarskiy (2874255)

    "their privacy policy makes it clear that the user owns all of their data. If this is true, I should have the right to destroy that data. "

    What is the basis for such a logical leap?

    If you're going to make an overreaching claim, you might as well ask for a pony too.

  • Here's a thought (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ArcadeMan (2766669) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @07:25PM (#45808263)

    If you don't want your life on the net, stop registering with your real information.

  • Easiest fix (Score:4, Insightful)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @07:51PM (#45808415) Homepage Journal

    The only way to win this game is not to play.

    Don't feel you have to participate in every social media site. You really won't miss anything if you don't. People will tell you, "You have to have a social media presence to get a job" but that's just BS.

    In fact, a very good skill to develop is the ability to ignore cultural phenomenon occasionally. It's almost like a superpower and it can really impact your happiness quotient. For example, I've made it to the last act of a semi-celebrity drama without knowing what a "Duck Dynasty" is, and the feeling is awesome. It takes a bit of preparation and planning, but it is possible to filter out nonsense. And make no mistake, social media is nonsense, and it's dangerous. You think you're getting something when in fact you're having something taken from you.

    • by PopeRatzo (965947)

      Note: You might ask, "If you don't know what a "Duck Dynasty" is, then how do you know the three-act arc of it's drama has come to an end?"

      The answer is that I know someone who obsessively follows all that shit. I asked her about a week back if there was anything about a "Duck Dynasty" that I need to know. She said, "Nah". Today, I got an email from her telling me the story has come to some denouement and said that my willful ignorance of the entire topic turned out to have been a wise choice. (I ask t

      • by PopeRatzo (965947)

        Please Note: You might ask, "If you don't know what a "Duck Dynasty" is, then how do you know the three-act arc of it's drama has come to an end?"

        The answer is that I know someone who obsessively follows all that shit. I asked her about a week back if there was anything about a "Duck Dynasty" that I need to know. She said, "Nah". Today, I got an email from her telling me the story has come to some denouement and said that my willful ignorance of the entire topic turned out to have been a wise choice. (

        • by eyenot (102141)

          * The End *

           

           

          ... ?

              ^--- !!!

          • by PopeRatzo (965947)

            I dunno how that happened. I swear I only hit Submit once. And don't that Slashdot code throw an error when you accidentally duplicate?

            Oh well, live and learn, right? But not about Duck Dynasty. Nossir.

    • The only way to win this game is not to play.

      Good point. If I may expound on that a little, once you post anything to any site, you essentially lose control of it. With social media like Slashdot which allow you to be a Pseudonymous Coward, there's little downside to that. But for sites like Facebook which require you to provide your real name and other real information, you lose something. Whether you gain more than you lose is up to you. For example, making contact with long-lost friends by using your real name on Facebook might be worth the lo

  • by Burz (138833) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @08:06PM (#45808481) Journal

    Its called 'DeleteMe' [abine.com] and you can check with them to see if they can help you with particular sites.

    This is the same group that makes the anti-tracking browser addon 'DoNotTrackMe'.

  • "

    Just always be ready with damage-control on the stuff you have sprinkled around online. Always be up front with yourself and your employers / whomever else whose opinion of your past internet activities could possibly ever matter enough to make you care that much about it / your employers.

    They would mostly be concerned about the image that you reflect onto their company. I've thought of this some times. To me, the best idea is to form a website that is your "professional image" site, and do damage-control from there. Maybe package it very simply with a link off of the front page to "My Web Footprint, Q & A".

    Start with a nice lead-in that captures the empathy of the audience.

    Go into detail about things that you find cringe-worthy, and shrug them off as not being a very big deal and not being reflective of who you are, today. Explain the misconceptions in your mind that led to those past statements or behaviors, and let the audience know how glad you are that you aren't like that any more. If there's evidence of that, link to the evidence.

    There, now you're not a potential liability, you're a success story that the corporation can be happy to link to and parade around as proof that they are in touch with real people, not just any people, upward-mobile people.

    You have the opportunity to get out of it in ways that older folks who did things they're ashamed of in the 60's and 70's didn't have:

    (1.) The opportunity to face it head-on by knowing fully well that it's easily discoverable information and by becoming your own blackmailer ahead of anyone else.

    (2.) The opportunity to spin it however you want and make it into whatever sort of rags-to-riches, turned-over-a-leaf, now-I-know-what-the-salt-of-the-Earth-is-really-like sort of story you really think people want to see.

    (3.) The opportunity to surround it with gay frog images and links to buy your published-on-demand memoirs of those weird times.

    • You suck -- I mean the advice you gave. Create a few alter-egos with the same name as you and register accounts.

      Then --- presto! --- it wasn't you but those other guys.

      No explanations required. Simple dismissal. Plausible deniability. Easy as 1-2-3.
  • by craigminah (1885846) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @09:27PM (#45808801)
    Slashdot won't delete your account either
  • The quote is "Nuke it from orbit, it's the only way to be sure." A carefully placed iron rod, dropped from high Earth orbit, would be quite effective as well.
  • by retech (1228598) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @10:57PM (#45809159)
    I had some asshole that I had emailed once dump their entire gmail contact list into nextdoor and now I get a twice weekly email update also asking me to join. I emailed the woman asking her to remove me, but she did not. So...

    I filtered their email with the following rules:
    1. forward email to originator
    2. forward to person who did this to me
    3. forward to the investment team who owns the site: shastaventures.com
    4. mark as junk
    5. delete


    I figure if they won't remove me, they might as well get the email too. You may want to use their email addresses and change the one you have on file with them.
  • by Fnord666 (889225) on Saturday December 28, 2013 @11:16PM (#45809233) Journal
    Timothy, Timothy, Timothy. When will you ever learn? "Ask Slashdot" posts belong in the "Ask Slashdot" section so that those of us who choose to filter out those stories can do so. It doesn't work though if you keep posting "Ask Slashdot" stories in other sections.
  • in a change of years' old policy, plentyoffish.com now requires users purchase a PAID ACCOUNT upgrade in order to delete their account. that's a really shitty way to do business, guys.

  • Yes, their user agreement might say you own your data, and it probably says a lot of other things. But honestly, what did you expect? Did you really think you could give them your data and expect them not to use it? Do you really trust social websites to look out for you? Such sites basically have two ways to make money, by showing you paid ads and selling/renting/"sharing" your data. Sorry, but if you're paying attention you must know that you can't trust any of them with anything you don't want to be publ

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